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Visas Simply

Visa categories offered by Australian Immigration Department - 0 views

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    The Australian immigration department has introduced many visa categories to cater to the needs of applicants in the best possible way. In this article, we...
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Jean Potter

http://betch.edublogs.org/2009/01/06/the-myth-of-the-digital-native/ - 36 views

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    Are all young people digital natives? Many older folks may well be digital immigrants but is there a marked difference in their abilities from digital natives?
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    This was a link from Joe's suggestion "ASH's 23 Things..." which I really liked. I would like to set up something similar on "my campus".
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    This article raised some great points about the labels we place on people of a certain age group, but obviously things are more complicated than the convenient labels our society uses to clasify people. The problem I see in the examples cited are the problems of a generation where you ask and it is done. Digital "immigrants" adapt and embrace new technology because of motivation. Their Job!! I agree that we need to utilize the exprience and perspective of my generation (49 yrs, 25 teaching) with the fearless exploration of my students. They show me what they've located and I can help them understand the relative value of what they've found. Help them develope the tools of analysis and I can learn how to get to information I didn't know existed. We don't need labels, we need to inspire students to want to know what's the value of what they've discovered.
Nigel Coutts

Revisiting Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants - 17 views

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    In 2001 Marc Prensky divided the world into two broad groups, Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants. His idea struck a chord with popular culture and has become a dominant paradigm in education. Given the core concept remains a feature of educational dialogues it is worth re-visiting and seeing how the idea might evolve to better serve our needs and understandings of how people born after the internet, learn with and think about, technology.
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Dennis OConnor

The Fischbowl: Is It Okay To Be A Technologically Illiterate Teacher? - 1 views

  • Here is my list:1. All educators must achieve a basic level of technological capability.2. People who do not meet the criterion of #1 should be embarrassed, not proud, to say so in public.3. We should finally drop the myth of digital natives and digital immigrants. Back in July 2006 I said in my blog, in the context of issuing guidance to parents about e-safety:"I'm sorry, but I don't go for all this digital natives and immigrants stuff when it comes to this: I don't know anything about the internal combustion engine, but I know it's pretty dangerous to wander about on the road, so I've learnt to handle myself safely when I need to get from one side of the road to the other."
  • 4. Headteachers and Principals who have staff who are technologically-illiterate should be held to account.5. School inspectors who are technologically illiterate should be encouraged to find alternative employment.6. Schools, Universities and Teacher training courses who turn out students who are technologically illiterate should have their right to a licence and/or funding questioned.7. We should stop being so nice. After all, we've got our qualifications and jobs, and we don't have the moral right to sit placidly on the sidelines whilst some educators are potentially jeopardising the chances of our youngsters.
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write. Extreme? Maybe. Your thoughts?
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • Keep in mind that was written after a particularly frustrating day. I’ve gone back and forth on this issue myself. At times completely agreeing with Terry (and myself above), and at other times stepping back and saying that there’s so much on teacher’s plates that it’s unrealistic to expect them to take this on as quickly as I’d like them to. But then I think of our students, and the fact that they don't much care how much is on our plates. As I've said before, this is the only four years these students will have at our high school - they can't wait for us to figure it out.
  • In order to teach it, we have to do it. How can we teach this to kids, how can we model it, if we aren’t literate ourselves? You need to experience this, you need to explore right along with your students. You need to experience the tools they’ll be using in the 21st century, developing your own networks in parallel with your students. You need to demonstrate continual learning, lifelong learning – for your students, or you will continue to teach your students how to be successful in an age that no longer exists
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write.
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    I read this post several years ago and it got my blood moving. The author, Karl Fisch lays it on the line. This post was voted the most influential ed-blog post of 2007. It's 2009 already and still a very relevant piece of work. A must read! (Let me add, that if you're reading this bookmark... you're at the front of the line and obviously working to understand and live in the 21st Century!)
Carlos Quintero

WebCite query result - 0 views

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    Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (NCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001) © 2001 Marc Prensky
Nik Peachey

12 Tips for training older teachers to use technology - Resources for English Language Learners and Teachers | Pearson English - 0 views

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    There is an assumption that persists in the educational community that more mature teachers are much more difficult and reluctant to be trained on the effective use of educational technology. To some degree, I think this assumption has been built on by the digital native vs digital immigrant myth. But as someone who has trained teachers of all ages all over the world I would say that, from my own experience, this hasn't been the case.
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David Peter

MIT Press Journals - International Journal of Learning and Media - Full Text - 0 views

  • Now, with study becoming a lifelong enterprise, and with the advent of a galaxy of new media, “learning” seems once again poised to become all things to all people, be they lay or scholarly.
    • David Peter
       
      So, since we are all lifelong learners with access to transparent, pervasive and ubiquitous technology ... not sure NEW media is all that NEW.
  • learning that do not occur automatically, readily, naturally, or by dint of simply living in a certain place at a certain time
    • David Peter
       
      Almost seems to be speaking of PROGRAMMED learning, and not the new learning environment/commons. Isn't all learning contextual?
  • we may well have reached a set of tipping points: Going forward, learning may be far more individualized, far more in the hands (and the minds) of the learner, and far more interactive than ever before
    • David Peter
       
      Barr and Tagg mentioned this SHIFT earlier.
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  • advent of a galaxy of new media
    • David Peter
       
      What NEW media are they speaking of? The NEW media is always changing and may be difficult to specifically link to lifelong learners. Prensky speaks of digital natives and digital immigrants. Does all media work for all readers/users?
  • we may well have reached a set of tipping points
    • David Peter
       
      We are BEYOND the tipping point. More likely to be a GROUNDSWELL and it's up to us to ride the wave or not.
  • learning may be at once more individual
    • David Peter
       
      Thanks to technology, or inspite of technology?
  • Both the demands of the workplace and the demands of education have changed profoundly and promise to do so for the foreseeable future.
    • David Peter
       
      And, in addition, the focus has shifted to global learning, and not localized learning. The advent of 21st century skills, the reemergence of liberal education ... all are continuing to change and demand change.
  • technology is often cited as a primary driver of cultural change
    • David Peter
       
      Interesting thought. Is this an anthropological conclusion? A social conclusion? Who has cited this?
  • One could argue that a strictly formal learning experience is characterized by classroom-based instruction featuring an explicit curriculum and traditional pedagogical goals, and scaffolding implemented by a single educator; a pure informal learning experience lacks all of these characteristics
    • David Peter
       
      This would imply that informal learnnig, without structure, is somehow inferior. Isn't the tone of learning set by the classroom, the teacher and other variables?
  • A successful informal learning practice depends upon an independent, constructivistically oriented learner who can identify, locate, process, and synthesize the information he or she is lacking
    • David Peter
       
      Hard to imagine that this can ONLY occur with a constructivist paradigm?
Tero Toivanen

Digital Citizenship | the human network - 0 views

  • The change is already well underway, but this change is not being led by teachers, administrators, parents or politicians. Coming from the ground up, the true agents of change are the students within the educational system.
  • While some may be content to sit on the sidelines and wait until this cultural reorganization plays itself out, as educators you have no such luxury. Everything hits you first, and with full force. You are embedded within this change, as much so as this generation of students.
  • We make much of the difference between “digital immigrants”, such as ourselves, and “digital natives”, such as these children. These kids are entirely comfortable within the digital world, having never known anything else. We casually assume that this difference is merely a quantitative facility. In fact, the difference is almost entirely qualitative. The schema upon which their world-views are based, the literal ‘rules of their world’, are completely different.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • The Earth becomes a chalkboard, a spreadsheet, a presentation medium, where the thorny problems of global civilization and its discontents can be explored out in exquisite detail. In this sense, no problem, no matter how vast, no matter how global, will be seen as being beyond the reach of these children. They’ll learn this – not because of what teacher says, or what homework assignments they complete – through interaction with the technology itself.
  • We and our technological-materialist culture have fostered an environment of such tremendous novelty and variety that we have changed the equations of childhood.
  • As it turns out (and there are numerous examples to support this) a mobile handset is probably the most important tool someone can employ to improve their economic well-being. A farmer can call ahead to markets to find out which is paying the best price for his crop; the same goes for fishermen. Tradesmen can close deals without the hassle and lost time involved in travel; craftswomen can coordinate their creative resources with a few text messages. Each of these examples can be found in any Bangladeshi city or Africa village.
  • The sharing of information is an innate human behavior: since we learned to speak we’ve been talking to each other, warning each other of dangers, informing each other of opportunities, positing possibilities, and just generally reassuring each other with the sound of our voices. We’ve now extended that four-billion-fold, so that half of humanity is directly connected, one to another.
  • Everything we do, both within and outside the classroom, must be seen through this prism of sharing. Teenagers log onto video chat services such as Skype, and do their homework together, at a distance, sharing and comparing their results. Parents offer up their kindergartener’s presentations to other parents through Twitter – and those parents respond to the offer. All of this both amplifies and undermines the classroom. The classroom has not dealt with the phenomenal transformation in the connectivity of the broader culture, and is in danger of becoming obsolesced by it.
  • We already live in a time of disconnect, where the classroom has stopped reflecting the world outside its walls. The classroom is born of an industrial mode of thinking, where hierarchy and reproducibility were the order of the day. The world outside those walls is networked and highly heterogeneous. And where the classroom touches the world outside, sparks fly; the classroom can’t handle the currents generated by the culture of connectivity and sharing. This can not go on.
  • We must accept the reality of the 21st century, that, more than anything else, this is the networked era, and that this network has gifted us with new capabilities even as it presents us with new dangers. Both gifts and dangers are issues of potency; the network has made us incredibly powerful. The network is smarter, faster and more agile than the hierarchy; when the two collide – as they’re bound to, with increasing frequency – the network always wins.
  • A text message can unleash revolution, or land a teenager in jail on charges of peddling child pornography, or spark a riot on a Sydney beach; Wikipedia can drive Britannica, a quarter millennium-old reference text out of business; a outsider candidate can get himself elected president of the United States because his team masters the logic of the network. In truth, we already live in the age of digital citizenship, but so many of us don’t know the rules, and hence, are poor citizens.
  • before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge.
  • Let us instead focus on how we will use technology in fifty years’ time. We can already see the shape of the future in one outstanding example – a website known as RateMyProfessors.com. Here, in a database of nine million reviews of one million teachers, lecturers and professors, students can learn which instructors bore, which grade easily, which excite the mind, and so forth. This simple site – which grew out of the power of sharing – has radically changed the balance of power on university campuses throughout the US and the UK.
  • Alongside the rise of RateMyProfessors.com, there has been an exponential increase in the amount of lecture material you can find online, whether on YouTube, or iTunes University, or any number of dedicated websites. Those lectures also have ratings, so it is already possible for a student to get to the best and most popular lectures on any subject, be it calculus or Mandarin or the medieval history of Europe.
  • As the university dissolves in the universal solvent of the network, the capacity to use the network for education increases geometrically; education will be available everywhere the network reaches. It already reaches half of humanity; in a few years it will cover three-quarters of the population of the planet. Certainly by 2060 network access will be thought of as a human right, much like food and clean water.
  • Educators will continue to collaborate, but without much of the physical infrastructure we currently associate with educational institutions. Classrooms will self-organize and disperse organically, driven by need, proximity, or interest, and the best instructors will find themselves constantly in demand. Life-long learning will no longer be a catch-phrase, but a reality for the billions of individuals all focusing on improving their effectiveness within an ever-more-competitive global market for talent.
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    Mark Pesce: Digital Citizenship and the future of Education.
J Black

The rise of the Digital Refuseniks - Newspaper Tree El Paso - 0 views

  • re•fuse•nik (n) somebody who refuses to agree to, take part in, or cooperate with something, especially on grounds of principle (informal)
  • Student must learn to use technology to do things other than surf the web and update their MySpace accounts (See my previous piece: Eating the Napkins). Research, collaboration, problem solving, and content creation are all things that need to be taught in school,
  • After a certain amount of time, if students are not receiving the proper technology integration in their classes, parents just have to say “You are not a digital immigrant. You are a digital Refuseniks, and we won’t tolerate that silliness any longer. My kid needs technology instruction just as much as she needs math and reading. There are no excuses for not having it. What is this school doing to help my child use technology?”
Paul Beaufait

What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success - Anu Partanen - National - The Atlantic - 16 views

  • As for accountability of teachers and administrators, Sahlberg shrugs. "There's no word for accountability in Finnish," he later told an audience at the Teachers College of Columbia University. "Accountability is something that is left when responsibility has been subtracted."
  • The main driver of education policy is not competition between teachers and between schools, but cooperation.
  • Decades ago, when the Finnish school system was badly in need of reform, the goal of the program that Finland instituted, resulting in so much success today, was never excellence. It was equity.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Finland -- unlike, say, very similar countries such as Norway -- was producing academic excellence through its particular policy focus on equity.
  •  the number of foreign-born residents in Finland doubled during the decade leading up to 2010, and the country didn't lose its edge in education. Immigrants tended to concentrate in certain areas, causing some schools to become much more mixed than others, yet there has not been much change in the remarkable lack of variation between Finnish schools in the PISA surveys across the same period.
  • Educational policy, Abrams suggests, is probably more important to the success of a country's school system than the nation's size or ethnic makeup.
  • When Finnish policymakers decided to reform the country's education system in the 1970s, they did so because they realized that to be competitive, Finland couldn't rely on manufacturing or its scant natural resources and instead had to invest in a knowledge-based economy. 
  • It is possible to create equality. And perhaps even more important -- as a challenge to the American way of thinking about education reform -- Finland's experience shows that it is possible to achieve excellence by focusing not on competition, but on cooperation, and not on choice, but on equity.
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    Partanen, Anu. (2011). What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success. The Atlantic. Retrieved January 9, 2012, from http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/12/what-americans-keep-ignoring-about-finlands-school-success/250564/
Visas Simply

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