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Dennis OConnor

Information Investigator 3 by Carl Heine on Prezi - 20 views

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    What if every student (and educator) was a good online researcher?  I know, you don't have the time to teach information fluency skills.  What if you could get a significant advance is skills with just a 2 -3  hour time commitment?  Here's a great Prezi 'fly by" of the new Information Investigator 3.1 online self paced class.  Watch the presentation carefully to find the link to a free code to take the class for evaluation purposes. 
Dennis OConnor

The Power of Twitter in Information Discovery | Both Sides of the Table - 30 views

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    The author provides a short history of information discovery that provides a fascinating context for the article.  You see the evolution of web info over the paste decade. You also get some true insight on how to consume information using social tools.  Abundant links to web 2.0 apps make this article well worth the time to read (and re-read it).  
Dennis OConnor

InfoLit: Home Page - 27 views

  • Tools for Teaching Information Literacy
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    Here's a great example of how Librarians are using the information fluency / literacy games from 21cif.com.
Dennis OConnor

The Shadow Scholar - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 19 views

  • The Shadow Scholar The man who writes your students' papers tells his story Jonathan Barkat for The Chronicle Review Enlarge Image $().ready(function() { $('#enlarge-popup').jqm({onShow:chronShow, onHide:chronHide, trigger:'a.show-enlarge', modal: 'true'}); }); Jonathan Barkat for The Chronicle Review By Ed Dante Editor's note: Ed Dante is a pseudonym for a writer who lives on the East Coast. Through a literary agent, he approached The Chronicle wanting to tell the story of how he makes a living writing papers for a custom-essay company and to describe the extent of student cheating he has observed. In the course of editing his article, The Chronicle reviewed correspondence Dante had with clients and some of the papers he had been paid to write. In the article published here, some details of the assignment he describes have been altered to protect the identity of the student.
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    One tactic is to proactively teach the nuances of plagiarism in an engaging way. Here's a link to a series of games that help all students (k-12 & Higher Ed) understand the issues. http://www.diigo.com/list/wiredinstructor/plagiarism_games While these games won't stop the kind of abuses described in the article, they will help teachers prove they have taken the necessary steps to inform and train their students about plagiarism and plagiarism detection.
Dennis OConnor

21st Century Literacy - 45 views

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    Teaching digital literacy, information literacy, citizenship literacy via journalism lessons and resources for 7-12 grade students. I like the combination of writing journalism with the deep thinking skills needed for information fluency.
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    This is a great resource. Lots of good ideas for integrating Web 2.0 tools and 21st century skills and supporting life long learning skills.
Dennis OConnor

Super searchers go to school ... - Google Books - 16 views

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    Interview and chapter from Dr. David Barr, founder of the 21st Century Information Fluency Project. This Google book article from Joyce Valenza & Reva Basch's book Super Searchers Go to school reaveal some of David's thinking about the knowledge, skills and dispositions for successful searching. Anyone who knows David Barr recognizes his amazing understanding of 21st century information systems. This is a gem. Don't miss it.
Dennis OConnor

Information Fluency: Online Class: Investigate and Evaluate Digital Materials - 0 views

  • On Demand Classes help you meet the needs of your students. You know the need for 21st Century Information Fluency Skills has never been higher You also know you’re understaffed and overbooked Start the new school year with a customized online training experience that will teach your students critical reading skills as they learn to search and evaluate Internet resources. Our multimedia enhanced, interactive course is suited for students from middle school through adult.
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    We combine performance evaluation with a series mastery quizzes to lock in the essential concepts delivered by the tutorials. As an educator you'll have access to performance evaluation and mastery quiz data. You'll have an online record of each student's performance that can be downloaded for data analysis.
Dennis OConnor

Internet Search Challenge: More information, a smaller fraction - 0 views

  • The paradoxical thing about information and searching is that the more of it there is, the less of it we will see. The results we retrieve will be a smaller and smaller sample of what's actually available. And I don't see how this trend can be reversed.
  • When I ask workshop participants if they've ever gone to the end of the list retrieved, I've never encountered anyone who has. Most searchers stop after the first page; the number who look at two pages is much smaller. For the 8 people in 100 who go beyond the third page, they have access to 0.1% of the information theoretically available. For the majority who never look beyond page one, that number falls to 0.025%.
Dennis OConnor

Why The FCC Wants To Smash Open The iPhone - washingtonpost.com - 0 views

  • Right about now, Apple probably wishes it had never rejected Google Voice and related apps from the iPhone. Or maybe it was AT&T who rejected the apps. Nobody really knows. But the FCC launched an investigation last night to find out, sending letters to all three companies (Apple, AT&T, and Google) asking them to explain exactly what happened.
  • The FCC investigation is not just about the arbitrary rejection of a single app. It is the FCC's way of putting a stake in the ground for making the wireless networks controlled by cell phone carriers as open as the Internet.
  • On the wired Internet, we can connect any type of PC or other computing device and use any applications we want on those devices. On the wireless Internet controlled by cellular carriers like AT&T, we can only use the phones they allow on their networks and can only use the applications they approve.
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  • Google must secretly be pleased as punch. It was only two years ago, prior to the 700MHz wireless spectrum auctions, that it was pleading with the FCC to adopt principles guaranteeing open access for applications, devices, services, and other networks. Now two years later, in a different context and under a different administration, the FCC is pushing for the same principles.
  • FCC cites "pending FCC proceedings regarding wireless open access (RM-11361) and handset exclusivity (RM-11497). That first proceeding on open access dates back to 2007 when Skype requested that cell phone carriers open up their networks to all applications (see Skype's petition here). Like Google Voice, Skype helps consumers bypass the carriers. The carriers don't like that because that's their erodes their core business and turns them into dumb pipes. But dumb pipes are what we need. They are good for consumers and good for competition because they allow any application and any device, within reason, to flower on the wireless Internet.
  • The FCC also wants Apple to explain the arbitrariness of its app approval process: 4. Please explain any differences between the Google Voice iPhone application and any Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) applications that Apple has approved for the iPhone. Are any of the approved VoIP applications allowed to operate on AT&T?s 3G network?5. What other applications have been rejected for use on the iPhone and for what reasons? Is there a list of prohibited applications or of categories of applications that is provided to potential vendors/developers? If so, is this posted on the iTunes website or otherwise disclosed to consumers?6. What are the standards for considering and approving iPhone applications? What is the approval process for such applications (timing, reasons for rejection, appeal process, etc.)? What is the percentage of applications that are rejected? What are the major reasons for rejecting an application?
  • Why does it take a formal request from a government agency to get Apple (and AT&T) to explain what the rules are to get on the wireless Internet?
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    Opening the iPhone would make educational apps much easier to publish. Apple's monopoly means e-text-book readers and classroom use of hand held computers (which is what the iPhone and iPod reall are) have to pay a toll to Apple. Right now, Apple's approval system is cloaked in mystery. Developers have no way to market their products without 'official' approval. Opening up the iPhone and by extension opening up wireless networks around the country will drive down high prices and bring connectivity to more inexpensive computing devices. I hope this FCC investigation is the domino that kicks open the door to the clouds of connectivity that are already out there!
Dennis OConnor

The Keyword Blog: Son of Citation Machine 5.0 / Warlick Video - 0 views

  • Son of Citation Machine 5.0Here's the latest edition of the very popular Son of Citation Machine from David Warlick. It handles MLA, APA, Turabian and Chicago. I've included a video from David so you can learn about from the source!Video tutorial by David Warlick on Citation Machine 5.0
Dennis OConnor

Digital Ethnography - 0 views

  • a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.
  • Almost 9 months ago, the College of Wooster president, Grant Cornwell, forwarded my video to a remarkable collection of people who were daring and creative enough to think they could dance it … not just dance to it … but truly dance it.
  • This little smartpen from livescribe just might revolutionize my note-taking in seminars, discussions, and ethnographic interviews.  If you have never seen it before, check out some of the demos on YouTube.  In short, it records audio as you write and links what you are writing to the audio (by recording what you write through a small infrared camera near the tip of the pen).  When you are done recording you can actually tap the pen anywhere on your page and the pen will play the audio that was recorded at the time you were making that specific pen stroke. 
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    Best know for the great viral video the Web is using us, Michael Wesch is exploring web 2.0 as only an anthropologist could. Fascinating work. Interesting mind!
Dennis OConnor

e-Learning Online: Website Investigator: See you at NECC 2009! - 0 views

  • Website Investigator: Information Forensics Goes to School
  • The purpose of this session is to provide participants with an understanding of efficient methods for evaluating online information and to demonstrate effective ways to teach these information fluency skills in classrooms.The new generation of NETS standards for students (ISTE, 2007), is based on the premise that efficacy and productivity depends on students’ abilities to conduct research and manage digital information fluently. An essential skill is the ability to evaluate information from a variety of sources and media.This session directly addresses this information fluency standard by helping participants…1. Understand the role of investigation (information forensics) in evaluating information:• Two types of searching: how investigation differs from speculation;• Determining when investigative searching is necessary and when it is not;• Effective means of finding critical information with limited clues;• Using specialized search engines and browsing techniques to track down information;• Analyzing results to determine credibility of the source and content.2. Observe effective methods for helping students exercise speculative search skills:• Off-line 'readiness' activities;• Group and individual Search Challenges;• Interactive tutorial games;• Think-aloud searches;• Evaluation reporting;• Group discussion about credibility.
Dennis OConnor

Evaluating Web 2.0 Resources - WebSlides - 1 views

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    A webslide show of 21cif evaluation resources. Lesson guides, onine games, podcasts, micromodules and more. All free and online at 21cif.com
Dennis OConnor

ASCD Inservice: The Curse of the Digitally Illiterate - 0 views

  • In his article in the February Educational Leadership ("Learning with Blogs and Wikis"), Bill Ferriter argues that digital tools like RSS feeds and aggregators help educators advance their professional learning. But first, some teachers need to join the ranks of the literate
  • Sadly, digital illiteracy is more common that you might think in schools. There are hundreds of teachers that haven't yet mastered the kinds of tools that have become a part of the fabric of learning—and life—for our students. We ban cell phones, prohibit text messaging, and block every Web application that our students fall in love with. We see gaming as a corrupting influence in the lives of children and remain convinced that Google is making us stupid. 
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    A solid and timely article about the professional responsibility all educators have to become digitally literate. The comments on this blog are particularly good. You get a real feel for what's happening in the trenches
Dennis OConnor

The Fischbowl: Is It Okay To Be A Technologically Illiterate Teacher? - 1 views

  • Here is my list:1. All educators must achieve a basic level of technological capability.2. People who do not meet the criterion of #1 should be embarrassed, not proud, to say so in public.3. We should finally drop the myth of digital natives and digital immigrants. Back in July 2006 I said in my blog, in the context of issuing guidance to parents about e-safety:"I'm sorry, but I don't go for all this digital natives and immigrants stuff when it comes to this: I don't know anything about the internal combustion engine, but I know it's pretty dangerous to wander about on the road, so I've learnt to handle myself safely when I need to get from one side of the road to the other."
  • 4. Headteachers and Principals who have staff who are technologically-illiterate should be held to account.5. School inspectors who are technologically illiterate should be encouraged to find alternative employment.6. Schools, Universities and Teacher training courses who turn out students who are technologically illiterate should have their right to a licence and/or funding questioned.7. We should stop being so nice. After all, we've got our qualifications and jobs, and we don't have the moral right to sit placidly on the sidelines whilst some educators are potentially jeopardising the chances of our youngsters.
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write. Extreme? Maybe. Your thoughts?
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  • Keep in mind that was written after a particularly frustrating day. I’ve gone back and forth on this issue myself. At times completely agreeing with Terry (and myself above), and at other times stepping back and saying that there’s so much on teacher’s plates that it’s unrealistic to expect them to take this on as quickly as I’d like them to. But then I think of our students, and the fact that they don't much care how much is on our plates. As I've said before, this is the only four years these students will have at our high school - they can't wait for us to figure it out.
  • In order to teach it, we have to do it. How can we teach this to kids, how can we model it, if we aren’t literate ourselves? You need to experience this, you need to explore right along with your students. You need to experience the tools they’ll be using in the 21st century, developing your own networks in parallel with your students. You need to demonstrate continual learning, lifelong learning – for your students, or you will continue to teach your students how to be successful in an age that no longer exists
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write.
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    I read this post several years ago and it got my blood moving. The author, Karl Fisch lays it on the line. This post was voted the most influential ed-blog post of 2007. It's 2009 already and still a very relevant piece of work. A must read! (Let me add, that if you're reading this bookmark... you're at the front of the line and obviously working to understand and live in the 21st Century!)
Dennis OConnor

21CIF: 21st Century Information Fluency - 0 views

  • Power Searching In a Web 2.0 world. ($99 Fee 5 CEUs) New to this site? Click the course title and you will be able to create an account and register for this 4 week facilitated class! Contact: Dennis O'ConnorOpen for enrollment! Begins February 9, 2009Login as Guest to view!
  • Introduction to Google Documents: Collaborate & Share Enroll now! February 9, 2009 1 - 5 (5 Days | One Week) 5 CDPUs Learn to use Google Word Processing Documents for productivity and collaboration. Trouble creating your account? E-Mail: wiredinstructor@gmail.comLogin as Guest to view!
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    21st Century Information Fluency Project Online Course Page: Lists 1 - 4 week courses in search skills and google docs
Dennis OConnor

The Essential Role of Information Fluency in E-Learning and Online Teaching | The Sloan... - 0 views

  • Curiously, most educators think they are competent searchers and evaluators, when they are really just beginners. Their disposition is to ask for help rather than search for answers. With simple instruction many radically improve their ability to search, and evaluate. This is empowering and greatly increases learner satisfaction. Instruction in copyright and fair use is also part of the program.
  • As online teachers and learners we work in a computer where information is just a few keystrokes away.
  • I've been researching and writing about Information Fluency since the turn of the century. My work is published on the 21st Century Information Fluency Portal: http://21cif.imsa.edu You'll find modular online learning content including games, micromodules and assessments on the portal. (Free for all educators.) I include information fluency training in all of my online classes. I introduce power searching and website investigation to the graduate students studying in the E-Learning and Online Teaching Certificate Program at UW-Stout ( http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/elearningcertificate.html ) because I believe that Information Fluency is a foundation skill for all online teachers and learners.
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    I've been researching and writing about Information Fluency since the turn of the century. My work is published on the 21st Century Information Fluency Portal: http://21cif.imsa.edu You'll find modular online learning content including games, micromodules and assessments on the portal. (Free for all educators.) I include information fluency training in all of my online classes. I introduce power searching and website investigation to the graduate students studying in the E-Learning and Online Teaching Certificate Program at UW-Stout ( http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/elearningcertificate.html ) because I believe that Information Fluency is a foundation skill for all online teachers and learners.
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