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Om Yoga Ashram

Great Online Yoga Training - 0 views

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    Learn Online 200Hour Best and Affordable Yoga Teacher Training and Improves Your Health Contact- https://www.omashram.in/ https://www.omyogaashram.in/ 1. Uses the placebo effect, to affect change 2. Supports your connective tissue 3. Encourages self-care 4. Helps you sleep deeper 5. Releases tension in your limbs 6. Maintains your nervous system 7. Improves your balance 8. Boosts your immune system functionality 9. Gives your lungs room to breathe 10. prevents IBS and other digestive problems 11. Makes you happier 12. Increases your self-esteem 13. Eases your pain 14. Gives you inner strength 15. Connects you with guidance 16. Help keep you drug-free 17. Builds awareness for transformation 18. Helps you serve others 19. Keeps allergies and viruses at bay 20. Benefits your relationships 21. Increases your blood flow 22. Drains your lymphs and boosts immunity 23. Founds a healthy lifestyle 24. Betters your bone health 25. Prevents cartilage and joint breakdown 26. Guides your body's healing in your mind's eye 27. Uses sounds to soothe your sinuses 28. Relaxes your system 29. Helps you focus 30. Builds muscle strength 31. Improves your flexibility 32. Perfects your posture 33. Drops your blood pressure 34. Regulates your adrenal glands 35. Lowers blood sugar
Om Yoga Ashram

Yoga Retreats Himachal India - 0 views

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    In a Yoga, Retreat Participant follows a disciplined schedule of activities, with the help of Yoga classes, healthy meals and the spiritual environment under the guidance of more experienced practitioners. A Yoga Retreat ensures plenty of time for relaxation, solitude, and personal practice to refine self-expression; it also provides opportunities to be outside in nature. Ultimately it helps disconnect from the busy schedule of life to be able to focus quality time being with the self in an authentic manner. This, in turn, can dramatically improve our relationship with our own self with a brighter sense of well-being.
Duane Sharrock

Knowledge: 77 Ways to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better - 0 views

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    Here are 77 tips related to knowledge and learning to help you on your quest. A few are specifically for students in traditional learning institutions; the rest for self-starters, or those learning on their own. Happy learning.
soniya shrma

Self-development: 10 Questions You Should Ask To Yourself - 0 views

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    Be all you can, but not always. I often see myself in the somewhat satisfied with my life things, but of course it is difficult to think of anything else when where are real issues to be discussed.
Jenna Watson

Acquire inexpensive price from Pilates Magic Circle at Australia. - 0 views

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    Pilates Magic Circle a multitalented Exercise tool. It's very useful device for Exercise kit & self improvement in your body part.
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    Pilates Magic Circle a multitalented Exercise tool. It's very useful device for Exercise kit & self improvement in your body part.
soniya shrma

Improve Your Designing Skills by Passing 9A0-125 Adobe ACE Exam - 0 views

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    The 9A0-125 exam certification highlights your area of expertise and validates the knowledge and skills that are required for Adobe Photo Shop Light room 2
Danny Nicholson

Inspirations - Blogosphere | Teachers TV - 0 views

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    Blogging is now a worldwide phenomenon with weblogs reaching a potential audience of hundreds of millions. Blogs have been described as the ultimate in publishing for the people and have been used to challenge governments and the press. Steve O'Hear, one of Britain's digital evangelists, explores how blogs can be used in schools. Steve finds some enthusiastic primary age bloggers and sees how it helps in literacy, ICT skills and a range of other subjects. He finds many of the benefits extend beyond the curriculum. Blogging can help pupils: * Develop confidence * Improve their self expression * Get a real sense of fulfilment from publishing their work In West Blatchington School in Hove, blogging is practised by everyone from the head down. Steve visits the school's after-school blogging club, a special bloggers' assembly and sees weblogs being used in the school's autistic unit.
Ruth Howard

Social Media Classroom - 0 views

  • The Social Media Classroom is a set of free and open source social media
  • It was initially created by Howard Rheingold and Sam Rose
  • Colab was created specifically to teach social media theory by the use of social media, a
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  • Although the Colab was created specifically to teach social media theory by the use of social media, and the Social Media Classroom includes resource lists, syllabi, and , lesson plans focused on that specific subject, it was intended from the beginning to serve as an all-purpose tool for educators who seek to use social media in pursuit of a more participative pedagogy. That’s where the community of practice comes in. We’re devoting an instance of the Colab to converations among educational practitioners that we hope to grow into a self-sustaining community around the use of social software in pedagogy in the broadest sense—any subject, any age level, any institution. We welcome participants who want to learn more, share best practices, meet others who share an interest in social media in education. The hope of those who created the initial Colab and accompanying curricular and support material is that this effort, and the tools we provide, will inspire others to vastly expand and deepen our resource repository, add their syllabi and lesson plans, discuss with and learn from others. We’ll start with Forums, where the early participants can meet and discuss what we’d like to do together, and the wiki, where we’ve seeded some fundamental resources and invite others to add new ones. If there is interest, we can add blogs, chat, RSS, social bookmarking, microblogging and video. The Colab is based on Drupal, a free and open source Content Management System, and we hope to grow ties with others in that community who are interested in working with educators to co-develop new tools and improve existing ones. To join the community click here
  • We’ll start with Forums, where the early participants can meet and discuss what we’d like to do together, and the wiki, where we’ve seeded some fundamental resources and invite others to add new ones. If there is interest, we can add blogs, chat, RSS, social bookmarking, microblogging and video.
  • a self-sustaining community around the use of social software in pedagogy in the broadest sense—any subject, any age level, any institution. We welcome participants who want to learn more, share best practices, meet others who share an interest in social media in education.
  • it was intended from the beginning to serve as an all-purpose tool for educators who seek to use social media in pursuit of a more participative pedagogy. That’s where the community of practice comes in.
  • we hope to grow ties with others in that community who are interested in working with educators to co-develop new tools and improve existing ones. To join the community click here
Tinhai Vong

e-competencies - 1 views

  • • Interestingly, teachers in countries like Sweden, Finland, Denmark, the Netherlands etc. do not belong to the (very) intensive ICT users in class. Only around 10% or less of the teachers in these countries use computers in more than 50% of their lessons. One can only speculate about the reasons for this. It seems that in these countries the use of computers and the internet has become the norm for most of the teachers and pupils in all aspects of life and that there no longer is the need to put a special emphasis on this in the teaching processes at school. However, most European countries still seem to be in the phase of increasing the frequency and intensity of ICT usage for education in class”.
  • • “Students who use computers least frequently at home also performed below average in PISA 2003. However, students using computers most frequently at school do not in all countries perform better than others.
  • the highest performances in PISA 2003 were seen among those students with a medium level of computer use rather than among those using computers the most”. [p.52] “
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  • The more clear-cut effect appears with home use: in every country, students reporting rare or no use of computers at home (on average 18% of students) score much lower than their counterparts”.
  • One of ICT’s main strengths is its capacity to support informal learning. Self-learning and informal peer-learning are by far the two most important mechanisms for obtaining skills and competences;
  • This possibility would be consistent with the observation that the amount of usage most commonly associated with the best performance is “moderate” – between once a week and once a month.
  • • “The PISA evidence confirms previous studies showing the particularly strong association of performance with home access and usage“.
  • If high amounts of computer usage at school are not associated with the better performing students, teachers may need to look more closely at the manner of this usage. Stronger supervision and structured lessons, involving the setting of concrete tasks to be achieved using computers, may improve their impact on performance”.[p.64]
  • STATEMENT TWO: Frequency of ICT use in students does not determine their academic performance.
  • STATEMENT THREE: No correlation between the level of ICT access and the percentage of the ICT use.
  • STATEMENT FOUR: The impact on education and training has not yet been as great as expected.
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    Digital competences go beyond e-skills and consist of the ability to access digital media and ICT, to understand and critically evaluate different aspects of digital media and media contents and to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts. It involves the confident and critical use of ICT for employment, learning, self-development and participation in society. Digital competences are one of the eight key competences identified and defined by the EU
Tero Toivanen

Digital Citizenship | the human network - 0 views

  • The change is already well underway, but this change is not being led by teachers, administrators, parents or politicians. Coming from the ground up, the true agents of change are the students within the educational system.
  • While some may be content to sit on the sidelines and wait until this cultural reorganization plays itself out, as educators you have no such luxury. Everything hits you first, and with full force. You are embedded within this change, as much so as this generation of students.
  • We make much of the difference between “digital immigrants”, such as ourselves, and “digital natives”, such as these children. These kids are entirely comfortable within the digital world, having never known anything else. We casually assume that this difference is merely a quantitative facility. In fact, the difference is almost entirely qualitative. The schema upon which their world-views are based, the literal ‘rules of their world’, are completely different.
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  • The Earth becomes a chalkboard, a spreadsheet, a presentation medium, where the thorny problems of global civilization and its discontents can be explored out in exquisite detail. In this sense, no problem, no matter how vast, no matter how global, will be seen as being beyond the reach of these children. They’ll learn this – not because of what teacher says, or what homework assignments they complete – through interaction with the technology itself.
  • We and our technological-materialist culture have fostered an environment of such tremendous novelty and variety that we have changed the equations of childhood.
  • As it turns out (and there are numerous examples to support this) a mobile handset is probably the most important tool someone can employ to improve their economic well-being. A farmer can call ahead to markets to find out which is paying the best price for his crop; the same goes for fishermen. Tradesmen can close deals without the hassle and lost time involved in travel; craftswomen can coordinate their creative resources with a few text messages. Each of these examples can be found in any Bangladeshi city or Africa village.
  • The sharing of information is an innate human behavior: since we learned to speak we’ve been talking to each other, warning each other of dangers, informing each other of opportunities, positing possibilities, and just generally reassuring each other with the sound of our voices. We’ve now extended that four-billion-fold, so that half of humanity is directly connected, one to another.
  • Everything we do, both within and outside the classroom, must be seen through this prism of sharing. Teenagers log onto video chat services such as Skype, and do their homework together, at a distance, sharing and comparing their results. Parents offer up their kindergartener’s presentations to other parents through Twitter – and those parents respond to the offer. All of this both amplifies and undermines the classroom. The classroom has not dealt with the phenomenal transformation in the connectivity of the broader culture, and is in danger of becoming obsolesced by it.
  • We already live in a time of disconnect, where the classroom has stopped reflecting the world outside its walls. The classroom is born of an industrial mode of thinking, where hierarchy and reproducibility were the order of the day. The world outside those walls is networked and highly heterogeneous. And where the classroom touches the world outside, sparks fly; the classroom can’t handle the currents generated by the culture of connectivity and sharing. This can not go on.
  • We must accept the reality of the 21st century, that, more than anything else, this is the networked era, and that this network has gifted us with new capabilities even as it presents us with new dangers. Both gifts and dangers are issues of potency; the network has made us incredibly powerful. The network is smarter, faster and more agile than the hierarchy; when the two collide – as they’re bound to, with increasing frequency – the network always wins.
  • A text message can unleash revolution, or land a teenager in jail on charges of peddling child pornography, or spark a riot on a Sydney beach; Wikipedia can drive Britannica, a quarter millennium-old reference text out of business; a outsider candidate can get himself elected president of the United States because his team masters the logic of the network. In truth, we already live in the age of digital citizenship, but so many of us don’t know the rules, and hence, are poor citizens.
  • before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge.
  • Let us instead focus on how we will use technology in fifty years’ time. We can already see the shape of the future in one outstanding example – a website known as RateMyProfessors.com. Here, in a database of nine million reviews of one million teachers, lecturers and professors, students can learn which instructors bore, which grade easily, which excite the mind, and so forth. This simple site – which grew out of the power of sharing – has radically changed the balance of power on university campuses throughout the US and the UK.
  • Alongside the rise of RateMyProfessors.com, there has been an exponential increase in the amount of lecture material you can find online, whether on YouTube, or iTunes University, or any number of dedicated websites. Those lectures also have ratings, so it is already possible for a student to get to the best and most popular lectures on any subject, be it calculus or Mandarin or the medieval history of Europe.
  • As the university dissolves in the universal solvent of the network, the capacity to use the network for education increases geometrically; education will be available everywhere the network reaches. It already reaches half of humanity; in a few years it will cover three-quarters of the population of the planet. Certainly by 2060 network access will be thought of as a human right, much like food and clean water.
  • Educators will continue to collaborate, but without much of the physical infrastructure we currently associate with educational institutions. Classrooms will self-organize and disperse organically, driven by need, proximity, or interest, and the best instructors will find themselves constantly in demand. Life-long learning will no longer be a catch-phrase, but a reality for the billions of individuals all focusing on improving their effectiveness within an ever-more-competitive global market for talent.
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    Mark Pesce: Digital Citizenship and the future of Education.
Think Inc

Life Lessons " Learn From Life " - 0 views

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    One click to change your life
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    One Click To Change Your Life
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    Easy way to trigger your positive thoughts
suzain johan

Online English Training Center - 0 views

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    learn English language step by step,improve your writing reading conversation skill in English language,free download English grammar books,free English learning software, practice latters,application CV in English & prepare your self for interview in English, & many more free English language material:
Sukhpreet Kaur

English Out There for Learners - Your questions answered (early) Online Class by Engl... - 0 views

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    Anyone can improve their English skills fast and for almost no money... you just need to have a proper study plan, and that is what English Out There provides.Using English Out There PDFs and MP3s with Facebook and Skype for unlimited speaking practice costs you just $0.12 per hour per course (self-study).
erikerickson

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | MindShift - 41 views

  • pupils today can change the way they study to exploit the brain’s quirky learning processes, using the strategies revealed by memory and learning research
  • Students need to understand that learning happens not only during reading and studying, but in all sorts of ways, so that they can examine their own habits to know which ones may be helping or not, and make adjustments
  • We can be tactical in our schooling.
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  • forgetting serves as a powerful spam filter
  • when the brain has to work hard to retrieve a half-forgotten memory (such as when reviewing new vocabulary words you learned the day before), it re-doubles the strength of that memory.
  • The brain is a foraging learner.
  • The human brain evolved to pick up valuable pieces of information here and there, on the fly, all the time, and put it all together
  • and it’s not only during study or practice
  • By foraging in this way, the brain is “building knowledge continually
  • Forgetting isn’t always bad.
  • Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.
  • Varying the studying environment
  • can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.
  • A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.
  • Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it
  • Experimenting With Learning Tactics
  • benefits of sleep (which improves retention and comprehension of what you learn), perceptual learning modules and mixing up different kinds of related problems or skills in practice sessions instead of repetitively rehearsing just one skill at a time.
  • teachers see all sorts of reforms come and go, and they’re skeptical
  • Surviving the Modern Jungle
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    Chen sums up an interview about Benedict Carey's book, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens, highlighting and exemplifying take-away messages for self-directed learners as well as teachers.
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