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Nigel Coutts

Debating false dichotomies: a new front in the education wars - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    Sometimes, it seems everyone who ever went to school is an expert on education and has a plan to make it better. Actual teaching experience, years of professional learning and formal training are all easily swept aside. The result is an ongoing dialog around what schools should do, what teachers need to do more of or less of and how the academic success of the nation is linked to strategy x or y.
Steve Ransom

Teaching for Understanding (Harvard GSE) on Vimeo - 46 views

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    Great video to watch and think about what learning should look like
Dwayne Abrahams

Google Changes Its Tune on Interviews - Vault: Blog - 12 views

  • Thus, the old pre-reqs are out: GPAs, transcripts, SATS.  In fact, Google is beginning to disregard academic educations altogether: they're just not a good predictor of success at the company. Says Bock, "After two or three years, your ability to perform at Google is completely unrelated to how you performed when you were in school, because the skills you required in college are very different. You’re also fundamentally a different person. You learn and grow, you think about things differently." According to the Times, Google is putting its money where its mouth is: they've actually increased their hires with no college education—14% of some of its teams have never been to school, according to Bock. Instead, the emphasis is on hiring candidates who are leaders, and work well in teams. The only way to discover this, says Bock, is through "structured" behavior interviews that assess how a person makes decisions. The winning interviewees will be able to demonstrate that they are "consistent and fair in how [they] think about making decisions and that there’s an element of predictability." This is key to building trust among team members once hired, he explains. "If a leader is consistent, people on their teams experience tremendous freedom, because then they know that within certain parameters, they can do whatever they want. If your manager is all over the place, you’re never going to know what you can do, and you’re going to experience it as very restrictive."
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    Google is beginning to disregard academic educations altogether: they're just not a good predictor of success at the company.  According to the Times, Google is putting its money where its mouth is: they've actually increased their hires with no college education-14% of some of its teams have never been to school, according to Bock. Instead, the emphasis is on hiring candidates who are leaders, and work well in teams.
Tero Toivanen

10 Educational iPad Apps Recommended by Explore Knowledge Academy| The Committed Sardine - 73 views

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    "There are so many great educational apps out there and more are being created daily. It's so hard to keep up, but luckily ESchool News has this article with 10 really great ones for you to focus on for now."
Cathy Oxley

Welcome to Knowledge Quest - 29 views

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    A game to build core skills in English
Paul Beaufait

Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA):Department - 10 views

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    "The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA ) is an internationally standardised assessment that was jointly developed by participating countries and administered to 15-year-olds in schools. PISA assesses how far students near the end of compulsory education have acquired some of the knowledge and skills that are essential for full participation in society" (¶1, retrieved 2011.04.15).
Tero Toivanen

Times Higher Education - From where I sit - Everyone wins in this free-for-all - 11 views

  • The term open educational resources (OER) encapsulates the simple but powerful idea that the world's knowledge is a public good. The internet offers unprecedented opportunities to share, use and reuse knowledge. Sadly, most of the planet is underserved when it comes to post-secondary education.
  • But while in our research we have no problem with sharing and building on the ideas of others, in education the perception is that we must lock teaching materials behind restrictive copyright barriers that minimise sharing.
  • Sometimes universities justify this position on the grounds that the open licensing of courses will damage their advantage in the student recruitment market. These publicly funded institutions expect taxpayers to pay twice for learning materials.
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  • Individuals are free to learn from OER hosted on the open web. It is, therefore, plausible that we can design and develop an "OER university" that will provide free learning for all students worldwide.
  • Working with Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand, the University of Southern Queensland in Australia and Athabasca University in Canada as founding anchor partners, we aim to help provide flexible pathways for OER learners to earn formal academic credentials and pay reduced fees for assessment and credit services under the community service mission of modern universities.
  • The OER Foundation will host an open planning meeting on 23 February to lay the foundations for this significant intervention. With support from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation, the meeting will be streamed on the web, and we invite all educational leaders to join us at this meeting in planning for the mainstream adoption of OER in post-secondary institutions.
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    The term open educational resources (OER) encapsulates the simple but powerful idea that the world's knowledge is a public good. The internet offers unprecedented opportunities to share, use and reuse knowledge. Sadly, most of the planet is underserved when it comes to post-secondary education.
Amanda Scott

Wolfram|Alpha: Computational Knowledge Engine - 0 views

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    Making the world's knowledge computable Today's Wolfram|Alpha is the first step in an ambitious, long-term project to make all systematic knowledge immediately computable by anyone. Enter your question or calculation, and Wolfram|Alpha uses its built-in algorithms and a growing collection of data to compute the answer. Based on a new kind of knowledge- based computing
Jeff Johnson

Content used to be king (learning in an online world) - 0 views

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    There was a time when books, newspapers, magazines and journals were the prime source of content and information.  It was always your move! navigating the authority maze,  enjoying slow reading of (limited) information sources in order to gain a knowledge base that matched a particular curriculum outline. This was when content was king and the teacher was the sage on the stage. Now communication is the new curriculum, and content is but grist to the mill that churns new knowledge. Why?  I came across a few good reads this week that set me thinking and wondering about the changes that we must support in our teaching and in our library services.
Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - The role of teachers in Education 3.0 - 0 views

  • Download-style education fails when we try to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to lead in a future that is very different from what exists today –and, in a future that defies human imagination.
  • Teaching in Education 3.0 requires a new form of co-constructivism that provides meaningful extensions to Dewey, Vygotsky and Freire, while building the future.
  • Specifically, teaching in Education 3.0 necessitates a Leapfrog approach with: Adults who are eager to imagine, create and innovate with kids Kids and adults who want to learn more about each other Kids and adults who partner to collaborate in teaching to and learning from each other Kids who work at creative tasks that mirror the innovation workforce An understanding that kids need to contribute to all economic levels, and with better distribution of effort than in the past
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  • The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0? ShareThis
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    The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0?
Ruth Howard

Wolfram|Alpha Blog : The Quest for Computable Knowledge: A Longer View - 0 views

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    Check out the timeline here for 'The Quest for Computer Knowledge' by Stephen Wolfram, who is inventing new Search capacities...Wolfram Alpha, coming May.
Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - The role of schools in Education 3.0 - 1 views

  • Education 3.0 schools produce knowledge-producing students, not automatons
  • Education 3.0 schools share, remix and capitalize on new ideas.
  • schools will express new forms of leadership within the communities that they serve.
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  • Education 3.0 schools embrace change rather than fighting change.
  • schools may become the driving forces of creating new paradigms that will drive this and future centuries.
  • Education 1.0 schools cannot teach 3.0 students.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      It's time to change!
  • If schools continue to embrace the 1.0 paradigm and are outmoded by students that thrive in a 3.0 society, we can only expect continuous failure.
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    An an era driven by globalized relationships, innovative social technologies, and fueled by accelerating change, how should we reinvent schools?
Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - Designing Education 3.0 - 0 views

  • This is my take on the future of education.
  • The role of the corresponding Education 1.0 regime was to create graduates that would perform well in jobs with easily defined parameters and relationships.
  • The role of Education 2.0 is to develop our talents to compete in a global market with new social relationships, and where we are able to leverage our knowledge.
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  • In this paradigm, information is no longer as important as the knowledge that’s created as we interpret information and create meaning. Increasingly, people are becoming more valued for their personal knowledge rather than their ability to perform tasks.
  • Society 2.0
  • Society 3.0 refers to an emerging innovation-based society that is not quite here, yet. This is a society that is driven by accelerating change, globalized relationships, and fueled by knowmads. In an era of accelerating change, the amount of information available doubles at an increasing rate, and the half-life of useful knowledge decreases exponentially. This requires innovative thinking and action by all members of society.
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    This is John Moravec's take on the future of education.
Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - Going global and purposive - 0 views

  • Five years ago, an amazing teacher or professor with the ability to truly catalyze the lives of his or her students could realistically hope to impact maybe 100 people each year. Today that same teacher can have their words spread on video to millions of eager students.
  • So, there we go. The question isn’t access to technologies, but how we make the most of the technologies and knowledge resources available. Rather than blindly advocating for technological adoption, is it now time to focus on the purposive use of technologies for human capital development?
Ruth Howard

Making Invisible Learning Visible | HASTAC - 0 views

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    Wacko! The Knowledge Project discussed here in this forum also...
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    The HASTAC Scholars fellowship program recognizes graduate and undergraduate students who are engaged in innovative work across the areas of technology, the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences. The HASTAC Scholars host regular discussion forums here featuring their own ground-breaking research and interests alongside those of leaders and innovators in the digital humanities, such as social networking pioneer Howard Rheingold, open source scholar Christopher Kelty, and Director of the Office of Digital Humanities for the National Endowment for the Humanities, Brett Bobley.
Bill Graziadei, Ph.D. (aka Dr. G)

Innovate: Rhizomatic Education: Community as Curriculum - 0 views

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    The pace of technological change has challenged historical notions of what counts as knowledge. Dave Cormier describes an alternative to the traditional notion of knowledge. In place of the expert-centered pedagogical planning and publishing cycle, Cormier suggests a rhizomatic model of learning. In the rhizomatic model, knowledge is negotiated, and the learning experience is a social as well as a personal knowledge creation process with mutable goals and constantly negotiated premises. The rhizome metaphor, which represents a critical leap in coping with the loss of a canon against which to compare, judge, and value knowledge, may be particularly apt as a model for disciplines on the bleeding edge where the canon is fluid and knowledge is a moving target.
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