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Aurialie Jublin

BBC - Capital - What happens when we work non-stop - 0 views

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    It makes accidents more likely, boosts stress levels, and even causes physical pain. But the real problem is that many people just can't afford not to do it. According to latest International Labour Organization statistics, more than 400 million employed people worldwide work 49 or more hours per week, a sizeable proportion of the near 1.8 billion total employed people worldwide. In a recent interview with The New York Times, even entrepreneur Elon Musk felt moved to describe his 47th birthday spent locked in his factory, pulling an all-nighter. "No friends, nothing," he said. It might have been just another day in another 120-hour work week. "This has really come at the expense of seeing my kids. And seeing friends," he added.
Aurialie Jublin

Are There Good Jobs in the Gig Economy? - 0 views

  • Author Louis Hyman, a Cornell professor and economic historian, notes that in America traditional organizations began moving away from offers of full-time employment and toward more-flexible short-term staffing jobs as a result of both new management ideas (such as the Lean Revolution) and changing values (such as prioritizing short-term profits). This restructuring of the workforce was facilitated, he emphasizes, by management consultants, who believed that “the long hours, the tensions, the uncertainty were all a perfectly reasonable way to work,” and by temp agencies, which created pools of standby, on-demand labor. By the 1980s temps were providing not emergency help but cyclical replacement.
  • Hyman’s stats are striking: By 1988 about nine-tenths of businesses were using temp labor; since 1991 every economic downturn has meant a permanent loss of jobs; by 1995, 85% of companies were “outsourcing all or part of at least one business function
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    "Advocates of these "alternative work arrangements"-many of which are enabled by sharing or on-demand apps such as Uber and TaskRabbit-bill them as a way to trade unemployment, burnout, or hating one's job for freedom, flexibility, and financial gains. Skeptics, meanwhile, point to the costly trade-offs: unstable earnings, few or no benefits, reduced job security, and stalled career advancement. But what do the gig workers themselves say? Gigged, a new book by Sarah Kessler, an editor at Quartz, focuses on their perspective. In profiling a variety of people in contingent jobs-from a 28-year-old waiter and Uber driver in Kansas City, to a 24-year-old programmer who quit his New York office job to join Gigster, to a 30-something mother in Canada who is earning money through Mechanical Turk-Kessler illuminates a great divide: For people with desirable skills, the gig economy often permits a more engaging, entrepreneurial lifestyle; but for the unskilled who turn to such work out of necessity, it's merely "the best of bad options.""
Aurialie Jublin

Exploring portable ratings for gig workers - Doteveryone - Medium - 0 views

  • Unlike the traditional economy, the gig economy doesn’t rely on CVs or letters of recommendation. You build your reputation on one platform at a time — and your reputation is often the route to higher earnings (A service user is more likely to choose someone with 100 five-star ratings than just one or two). Platforms don’t want people to leave, so they don’t let workers have ownership over their own ratings. Leaving a service means starting over.
  • More recently, we’ve been exploring the “how” of ratings portability: what technology, data, user experience and investment might be needed to make this real.Our design team, along with our policy intern and developer James Darling, have been conducting user research and prototyping possible technical solutions for ratings portability. Here’s where we’ve got to so far.
  • “Cab” drivers didn’t have visible habits around their ratings, weren’t checking them frequently and when we spoke about them, they told us that this wasn’t something they’d considered before or something they were particularly concerned about. They were confident in their skills and ability to find work outside of their platforms, and viewed ratings more as performance indicators for their platform owners — the main fear being a drop below 3.5 stars, where they might be dropped from the platform completely.
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  • This “performance indicator over ratings” feeling was even stronger with food delivery workers. They expressed even less concern about the issue, focussing more on their delivery metrics such as attendance and cancellations. The rider app screens we were shown support this.
  • This makes sense for both food delivery and transit: the customer has little to no ability to use workers’ reputation data to inform their purchase decision. (When we press a button to order a cab or for food to be delivered, speed is the primary factor and platforms emphasise that in their design.)
  • It was a radically different story for tradespeople. Their reputation data feels important to them, and they prefer to keep control over it. They preferred word of mouth reputation and recommendations, as there was no middleman who could take that away from them. Online platforms were seen as something to graduate away from once you had a sufficient “real world” presence.
  • Alongside our user research, James Darling looked at the technical possibilities, drawing on the Resolution Trust’s initial work and the research that our policy intern did. They came up with five possible solutions and gave them names and some logos. They are in increasing order of complexity.
  • Personal referenceThis is the status quo: when approaching a new employer, workers create their own CVs, loosely standardised by convention.
  • Publicly hosted reputationsWhat feels like a technical quick win is to ensure that a platform hosts a publicly accessible web archive of all worker reputation data, including for profiles which have been disabled. This would allow workers to provide a URL to anyone they wish to provide their reputation data. How would this be encouraged/enforced?
  • Profile verificationHow does a worker prove that they are the owner of a publicly hosted reputation profile? There are a few technical solutions that could be explored here, like a public/private key verification or explorations around OAuth. Is it possible to create something that is secure, but also usable?
  • Decentralised open data standardA data standard for reputation data could be created, allowing automated transfer and use of reputation data by competing platforms or external services. Creating the standard would be the trickiest part here: is it possible to translate between both technical differences of different platforms (eg 5 stars versus 80%), but also the values inherent in them.
  • Centralised data holderPerhaps one way to help standardise and enforce this easy transfer of reputation data is to create some sort of legal entity responsible for holding and transferring this reputation data. A lot of discussion would have to be had about the legal framework for this: is it a government department, a charity, a de facto monopoly?
  • We also thought about ways to verify identity (by including an RSA public key), what a best practice data standard might look like (here’s an example in JSON), and what the import process might look like (via a mock competitor site). The code for all this is on Github, and everything above is available in a slide deck here.
  • I worry that the concept of “owning” people’s ratings reflects some deeper, more systemic issues around who “owns” things more generally in society. In the coming months, we’d like to keep working with like minded organisations to explore that idea more, as well as how the cumulative effects of those systems affect us all.
Aurialie Jublin

The Gig Economy Isn't Just For Startups Anymore - 0 views

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    Gig workers are coming to some of the world's largest corporations too. Increasingly Fortune 500 companies and global giants like Samsung are turning to online freelancing platforms like Upwork and PeoplePerHour to find designers, marketing staff, IT specialists and other knowledge workers.
Aurialie Jublin

Premier mouvement social des livreurs à vélo à Paris, Lyon et Bordeaux - 0 views

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    "Les livreurs à vélo veulent s'organiser collectivement pour engager le dialogue avec les plates-formes de livraison. Un premier syndicat est en cours de constitution et des rassemblements sont organisés ce 15 mars à Paris, Lyon et Bordeaux."
Aurialie Jublin

We all have the 'right to disconnect' - but only some of us can afford it | Evgeny Moro... - 0 views

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    "Laws protecting workers from employers' out-of-hours emails ignore the fact that, for many, switching off is not an option"
Aurialie Jublin

How are workers faring in the gig economy? - 0 views

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    Most workers in the on-demand economy are considered by the platforms that they work for as being freelance workers. What are the consequences for workers of being classified that way?
Aurialie Jublin

Europe Will Defend Its Gig Economy Workers - Bloomberg View - 1 views

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    "On Thursday, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly to back a report calling for better worker protections in the on-demand economy, also known as the sharing economy. The resolution isn't binding, but potentially, the issue presents a bigger threat to companies such as Uber than the resistance of their more traditionalist rivals. Europe is not afraid to appear retrograde when it comes to worker benefits, and though that may drag it down economically, it's also what makes it a nice place to live and work."
Aurialie Jublin

Can We Design An On-Demand Economy That Will Work For Everyone? | Co.Exist - 0 views

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    "We know what the future of work will be for a lot of workers-so now it's time to try to make it better."
Aurialie Jublin

«Payer pour travailler», le nouveau paradigme du boulot sans limites | Slate.fr - 1 views

  • C'est que certains situations se sont banalisées: payer sa formation et sa qualification pour voler sous les couleurs de Ryanair; payer pour accéder à un stage de reconversion auprès d’une association après un licenciement; payer pour acquérir une franchise et rebondir lorsqu’on est un cadre au chômage. Mais aussi payer de sa personne en se déqualifiant lorsqu’on est jeune diplômé en additionnant les stages à des fractions de Smic pour être moins cher que son voisin et espérer pouvoir revendiquer un début d’expérience professionnelle sur son CV. Payer en acceptant aussi des rémunérations qui, dans les services d’aide à la personne, ne couvrent que 70% du travail effectif. Payer aussi, sur son temps, comme cadre en travaillant sans limite dans le système des forfaits jours et en accumulant les heures gratuites jusqu’au burn-out pour atteindre ses objectifs. Ou payer lorsqu’on est auto-entrepreneur et corvéable à merci, en faisant l’impasse sur la rentabilité pour obtenir des missions à un coût moins élevé qu’un salarié…
  • Et si l’accumulation de ces désillusions qui prennent leurs racines dans le travail low cost et la régression des droits fondamentaux liés au travail, alimentait l’effritement de notre capacité actuelle à vivre ensemble en minant «notre contrat social», s’interroge Valérie Segond ? La réponse est dans la question. Le problème posé par le low cost dans le travail va bien au-delà d’une simple réduction des coûts.
  • La journaliste a pris le temps d’analyser le mode de calcul du coût du travail établi par l’Insee… pour découvrir que les petites entreprises de moins de dix salariés où les salaires sont plus bas ne sont pas pris en compte à travers la méthodologie, que le coût de la main d’œuvre des travailleurs indépendants comme les auto-entrepreneurs n’étaient pas pris en compte dans ce coût… et bien d’autres aberrations parce que «les nouvelles formes d’emploi sont trop hétérogènes pour qu’on les comprenne dans le coût du travail», reconnait-on à l’institut.
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  • Même chose pour le temps de travail. Que veut dire aujourd’hui le procès fait aux 35 heures lorsque des fonctions autrefois dévolues à des salariés sont externalisées auprès de consultant hors de l’entreprises ou à des auto-entrepreneurs, hors de toute réglementation sociale pour s’affranchir de la durée légale du travail?
  • Le découpage des métiers en microtâches associé à la flexibilité permet aux employeurs de ne payer que les temps les plus productifs du travail, et d’employer gratuitement le salarié pour le reste du temps qui lui est néanmoins nécessaire pour accomplir l’ensemble de sa tâche, démontre Valérie Segond.
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    "Dans son livre «Va-t-on payer pour travailler?», la journaliste Valérie Segond enquête sur des dérives du travail low cost et de la flexibilité qui se généralisent."
Aurialie Jublin

Why the digital gig economy needs co-ops and unions | openDemocracy - 0 views

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    "Millions of people are joining the digital gig economy, attempting to outbid one another for increasingly precarious bit-work. We need to challenge that culture."
Aurialie Jublin

What Does A Union Look Like In The Gig Economy? | Fast Company | Business + Innovation - 0 views

  • Drivers who work on Uber, Lyft, and Sidecar have started "App-Based Drivers Associations" in at least two states. The California branch teamed up with local Teamsters in August for "organizational and lobbying assistance," and in September, after Uber drivers in New York created a Facebook Page called Uber Drivers Network NYC, some of them went on strike over Uber fare cuts.
  • Like it or not, employment in the United States looks different than it did 50 years ago—at least 30% of the workforce are independent contractors, the ratio of part-time workers to full-time workers is still higher than before the recession, and there are 2.87 million temporary workers, a record number. Some argue that the gig economy—comprised of companies like Uber, TaskRabbit, Postmates, and Handy, who coordinate independent contractors on a task-by-task basis instead of hiring employees—is a promising development in this conundrum. It offers flexible supplemental income the regular economy is not supplying. Others argue it’s a return to the piecework system that exploited workers before the modern concept of "employee" came on the scene.
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    "WITHOUT THE RIGHT TO UNIONIZE, GIG ECONOMY WORKERS RISK EXPLOITATION. BUT ORGANIZING 21RST CENTURY WORKERS IS NO EASY FEAT."
Aurialie Jublin

Cut-Throat Capitalism: Welcome To the Gig Economy | Alternet - 0 views

  • “For one month, I became the ‘micro-entrepreneur’ touted by companies like TaskRabbit, Postmates, and Airbnb. Instead of the labor revolution I had been promised, all I found was hard work, low pay, and a system that puts workers at a disadvantage.”
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    "Economist Gerald Friedman warns that the much-hyped gig economy is a road to ruin for workers"
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