Skip to main content

Home/ Tic&Travail/ Group items tagged condition de travail

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Aurialie Jublin

The Day I Drove for Amazon Flex - The Atlantic - 0 views

  • But Flex operates year-round, not just during the holiday season, which suggests there’s another reason for it: It’s cheap. As the larger trucking industry has discovered over the past decade, using independent contractors rather than unionized drivers saves money, because so many expenses are borne by the drivers, rather than the company.
  • The company doesn’t share information about how many drivers it has, but one Seattle economist calculated that 11,262 individuals drove for Flex in California between October 2016 and March 2017, based on information Amazon shared with him to help the company defend a lawsuit about Flex drivers.
  • “A lot of these gig-type services essentially rely on people not doing the math on what it actually costs you,”
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • One Amazon Flex driver in Cleveland, Chris Miller, 63, told me that though he makes $18 an hour, he spends about 40 cents per mile he drives on expenses like gas and car repairs. He bought his car, used, with 40,000 miles on it. It now has 140,000, after driving for Flex for seven months, and Uber and Lyft before that. That means he’s incurred about $40,000 in expenses—things he didn’t think about initially, like changing the oil more frequently and replacing headlights and taillights. He made slightly less than $10 an hour driving for Uber, he told me, once he factored in these expenses; Flex pays a bit better.
  • If the driver gets into a car accident, the driver, not Amazon, is responsible for medical and insurance costs. If a driver gets a speeding ticket, the driver pays. (UPS and FedEx usually pay their trucks’ tickets, but Amazon explicitly says in the contract Flex drivers sign that drivers are responsible for fees and fines­.)
  • Brown likes to work two shifts delivering groceries for Amazon, from 4:30 to 6:30 a.m. and 6:30 to 8:30 a.m., but the morning we talked, no 4:30 shifts were available. He sometimes wakes up at 3 a.m. and does what Flex workers call the “sip and tap,” sitting at home and drinking coffee while refreshing the app, hoping new blocks come up. He does not get paid for the hour he spends tapping. Twice in the last year, he’s been barred from seeing new blocks for seven days because Amazon accused him of using a bot to grab blocks—he says he just taps the app so frequently Amazon assumes he’s cheating.
  • Akunts said that people often get “deactivated,” which means they receive a message telling them they can no longer drive for Flex. Sometimes, the workers don’t know why they’ve been terminated and their contract annulled, he told me. It can take as long as a month to get reinstated.
  • But lots of people risk it and park illegally in meters, he told me—the number of parking citations issued in the first three months of the year for people parking illegally at red and yellow meters grew 29 percent from 2016, according to data provided to me by the city.
  • And then there was the fact that the Flex technology itself was difficult to use. Flex workers are supposed to scan each package before they deliver it, but the app wouldn’t accept my scans. When I called support, unsure of what to do, I received a recorded messaging saying support was experiencing technical difficulties, but would be up again soon. Then I got a message on my phone telling me the current average wait time for support was “less than 114,767 minutes.” I ended up just handing the packages to people in the offices without scanning them, hoping that someone, somewhere, was tracking where they went.
  • Technology was making their jobs better—they worked in offices that provided free food and drinks, and they received good salaries, benefits, and stock options. They could click a button and use Amazon to get whatever they wanted delivered to their offices—I brought 16 packages for 13 people to one office; one was so light I was sure it was a pack of gum, another felt like a bug-spray container.
  • But now, technology was enabling Amazon to hire me to deliver these packages with no benefits or perks. If one of these workers put the wrong address on the package, they would get a refund, while I was scurrying around trying to figure out what they meant when they listed their address as “fifth floor” and there was no fifth floor. How could these two different types of jobs exist in the same economy?
  • Gig-economy jobs like this one are becoming more and more common. The number of “non-employer firms” in the ground-transportation sector—essentially freelancers providing rides through various platforms—grew 69 percent from 2010 to 2014, the most recent year for which there is data available, according to a Brookings analysis of Census Bureau and Moody’s data.
  • “We’re going to take the billion hours Americans spend driving to stores and taking things off shelves, and we’re going to turn it into jobs,” Viscelli said. “The fundamental question is really what the quality of these jobs is going to be.”
  • Liss-Riordan says one of the biggest obstacles in getting workers to take legal action over their classification is that many Flex workers agree, upon signing up to deliver packages, to resolve disputes with Amazon through arbitration. Companies can now use arbitration clauses to prevent workers from joining together to file class-action lawsuits, because of a May Supreme Court ruling.
  • Even weeks after I’d stopped driving for Flex, I kept getting new notifications from Amazon, telling me that increased rates were available, tempting me to log back in and make a few extra bucks, making me feel guilty for not opening the app, even though I have another job.
  • My tech-economy experience was far less lucrative. In total, I drove about 40 miles (not counting the 26 miles I had to drive between the warehouse and my apartment). I was paid $70, but had $20 in expenses, based on the IRS mileage standards. I had narrowly avoided a $110 parking ticket, which felt like a win, but my earnings, added up, were $13.33 an hour. That’s less than San Francisco’s $14 minimum wage.
  •  
    "Amazon Flex allows drivers to get paid to deliver packages from their own vehicles. But is it a good deal for workers?"
Aurialie Jublin

Cher Elon Musk, oublie les robots-tueurs, voici ce qui devrait vraiment t'inq... - 0 views

  • Tu devrais jeter cet œil inquiet (et attentif) au Rapport AI Now (2016). Tu devrais te soucier des thèmes qu’ils mettent en lumière, notamment en ce qui concerne les impacts sur le travail, la santé, l’égalité et l’éthique à l’heure où l’intelligence artificielle s’insinue dans nos vies quotidiennes.
  • Tu devrais réfléchir à la façon dont l’apprentissage machine change nos façons de travailler et le travail tout court. Tu devrais te préoccuper de l’impact de l’intelligence artificielle sur la création et la destruction de nos emplois, te soucier des questions éducatives, de formation à de nouveaux métiers et des allocations et modes de redistribution qui devraient résulter d’une reconfiguration du travail par l’IA. Tu devrais considérer la question de l’automatisation non pas seulement du point de vue de la robotique mais sous l’angle des infrastructures : comment les industries du transport, de la logistique, seront affectées par l’apprentissage machine ? Scoop : elles le sont déjà au prix de nombreux emplois.
  • Tu devrais te préoccuper des articles publiés par ProPublica sur les biais algorithmiques, notamment celui-ci qui explique comment les logiciels de police prédictive accusent de façon inconsidérée les noirs et beaucoup moins les blancs. Tu devrais te soucier de cet autre article de ProPublica qui indique que certains assureurs augmentent les prix pour les personnes de couleur. Les raisons sous-jacentes ne sont pas si claires mais selon ProPublica, des algorithmes prédateurs favorisent les quartiers blancs plus que les autres. La négligence derrière cette masse de données devrait t’inquiéter
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Tu devrais t’inquiéter de la provenance des données qui entraînent ces algorithmes. Tu devrais t’offusquer de voir ces données récupérées sans consentement explicite, comme l’a montré The Verge dans cet article qui rapporte que des images de personnes transgenres en transition ont été utilisées sans leur consentement dans le cadre d’un projet de recherche portant sur la reconnaissance faciale grâce à l’intelligence artificielle.
  • ProPublica révèle aussi que le système de « scoring » établissant une possibilité forte de « commettre de nouveau un crime » généré par les logiciels de police prédictive était utilisé pour alourdir les peines. Les juges s’en servent comme d’une aide, une « preuve algorithmique » issue d’un nouvel outil au service du système judiciaire. Voici une préoccupation majeure.
  • Que se passe-t-il quand un utilisateur se retrouve coincé dans une série de systèmes sans pouvoir en sortir ? Que se passe-t-il quand un agent conversationnel est bloqué, quand des données sont fausses et qu’il n’y a personne pour proposer à l’utilisateur d’apporter des modifications ou des rectifications ? Les machines font des erreurs, un point c’est tout. La question est donc : comment ces systèmes gèrent-ils leurs propres erreurs ?
  • Elon, tu devrais t’inquiéter des capteurs qui ne reconnaissent pas la peau noire. Tu devrais t’inquiéter des produits insensibles à certaines couleurs, comme par exemple ces distributeurs de savon qui ne réagissent pas aux mains noires. Tu devrais t’inquiéter des caméras qui suggèrent que les asiatiques ont « cligné des yeux » parce que leur système est majoritairement entraîné par des profils de type caucasien.
Aurialie Jublin

Workers at Facebook (FB), Tesla (TSLA) and Amazon (AMZN) might as well work at Walmart ... - 1 views

  •  
    "I've seen people pass out, hit the floor like a pancake, and smash their face open," a worker at Tesla's "factory of the future" told the Guardian in a report published this week. "They just send us to work around him while he's still lying on the floor." The Guardian report described long hours and intense pressure to meet CEO Elon Musk's production goals-even if that means enduring or ignoring injuries. Since 2014, according to the report, hundreds of ambulances have been called to the factory to treat workers. This portrayal doesn't quite jive with Musk's world-changing vision. And Tesla isn't only Silicon Valley company facing this type of irony. Technology companies' reputations as employers often stem from how they treat highly paid engineers, but many also employ thousands of blue collar workers. Tech workers at these companies receive high pay, elaborate perks, and progressive workplace policies, but blue collar workers for the same companies often work in circumstances that look much less...
abrugiere

Le prolétariat du web accède à la conscience de classe et lance sa première a... - 1 views

  • Parmi les points soulevés par les Turkers, on trouve le fait qu’Amazon ne fixe pas de salaire minimum en ligne, ou qu’il se réserve une commission de 10% sur chaque transaction. Car les Turkers ne travaillent pas forcément pour le libraire en ligne, Amazon jouant aussi l’intermédiaire entre les travailleurs et les besoins d’entreprises tierces, telle une agence d’interim numérique. Les plaintes concernent donc surtout les commanditaires de ce micro-travail, certains refusant de valider le travail effectué parce qu'il ne leur convient pas, sans que les internautes aient de recours ou de possibilité de défendre la qualité de leur travail.
  • Les premiers témoignages des travailleurs sont poignants, et reflètent la diversité des profils et des motivations. On trouve par exemple une veuve retraitée qui explique que le revenu de Mechanical Turk complète sa pension de retraite, et que certaines tâches proposées, ardues, l’aident à conserver une vivacité mentale. 
  •  
    "Les «digital workers» de Mechanical Turk, la plateforme de micro-travail en ligne d'Amazon, ont lancé une campagne d'envoi de lettres de doléances à Jeff Bezos."
  •  
    Les «digital workers» de Mechanical Turk, la plateforme de micro-travail en ligne d'Amazon, ont lancé une campagne d'envoi de lettres de doléances à Jeff Bezos. 500.000 digital workers seraient passés par la plateforme d'Amazon, et pour la première fois, écrit The Guardian, ces «Turkers» ont lancé ce qui ressemble à une revendication collective de travailleurs. Parmi les points soulevés par les Turkers, on trouve le fait qu'Amazon ne fixe pas de salaire minimum en ligne, ou qu'il se réserve une commission de 10% sur chaque transaction. Car les Turkers ne travaillent pas forcément pour le libraire en ligne, Amazon jouant aussi l'intermédiaire entre les travailleurs et les besoins d'entreprises tierces, telle une agence d'interim numérique. Les plaintes concernent donc surtout les commanditaires de ce micro-travail, certains refusant de valider le travail effectué parce qu'il ne leur convient pas, sans que les internautes aient de recours ou de possibilité de défendre la qualité de leur travail. Les premiers témoignages des travailleurs sont poignants, et reflètent la diversité des profils et des motivations. On trouve par exemple une veuve retraitée qui explique que le revenu de Mechanical Turk complète sa pension de retraite, et que certaines tâches proposées, ardues, l'aident à conserver une vivacité mentale. 
Chamila Puylaurent

Redonner du sens au travail est un défi managérial - Paroles d'entrepreneurs - 1 views

  •  
    "Olivier Fronty, vice-président d'Arnava, cabinet d'accompagnement à la performance du groupe SBT, analyse pourquoi la qualité de vie au travail est un facteur clé de la performance des entreprises. "
Aurialie Jublin

L'encadrement en première ligne sur les conditions de travail - 0 views

  •  
    L'Agence nationale pour l'améliorartion des conditions de travail (Anact) vient de présenter les résultats du sondage sur la place accordée à l'expression des salariés sur le travail et les conditions de travail dans l'entreprise. Les conditions de travail (environnement de l'activité, allongement de la vie au travail, santé au travail, risques psychosociaux, troubles musculo-squelettiques, organisations du travail…), on en parle de plus en plus. Entre collègues (notamment dans les petites entreprises), avec le manager de proximité mais également en dehors de la sphère professionnelle (famille, amis). Cependant, ''cette fréquence de discussion n'implique pas de mauvaises conditions de travail dans l'entreprise'' remarque l'Anact : 86% des sondés indiquent qu'elles sont bonnes ! Surprise : les mauvaises conditions perçues sont plus fréquentes dans les très grandes entreprises. Sans surprise, ce sont les plus de 50 ans qui relèvent les dégradations.
Aurialie Jublin

On parle de son travail avec ses collègues mais...ça sert pas à grand chose - 1 views

  •  
    Les salariés français parlent beaucoup de leurs conditions de travail...mais entre eux. Et pas assez avec la direction et les délégués du personnel. Si cela leur fait plutôt du bien, ils regrettent que cela soit peu suivi d'effets. A part quand le management leur tend une oreille. Revue de détail avec le sondage de l'Anact à l'occasion de la 9ème édition de la semaine de la qualité de vie au travail.
1 - 9 of 9
Showing 20 items per page