Skip to main content

Home/ Tic&Travail/ Group items tagged uber

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Aurialie Jublin

Plateformes de livraison : pour les mineurs, une course à l'argent facile - L... - 0 views

  •  
    Aider ses parents, se payer des chaussures ou le permis… Lycéens, voire collégiens, souvent de banlieue, sont de plus en plus nombreux à travailler illégalement pour Uber Eats, Stuart ou Deliveroo, au risque d'abandonner définitivement leur scolarité.
Aurialie Jublin

Uber, Deliveroo : le statut spécial voulu par le gouvernement censuré - 0 views

  •  
    Le Conseil constitutionnel a rejeté pour des raisons de procédure l'article de la loi « Avenir professionnel » ouvrant la possibilité pour les plates-formes de conclure une charte sociale couvrant leurs travailleurs. Motif : aucun lien avec le texte initial de la loi.
Aurialie Jublin

Worker Surveillance and Class Power - « Law and Political Economy - 0 views

  • As a first example, consider how workplace monitoring generates data that companies can use to automate the very tasks workers are being paid to perform. When Uber drivers carry passengers from one location to another, or simply cruise around town waiting for fares, Uber gathers extensive data on routes, driving speed, and driver behavior. That data may prove useful in developing the many algorithms required for autonomous vehicles—for example by illuminating how a reasonable driver would respond to particular traffic or road conditions.
  • with GPS data from millions of trips across town, Uber may be able to predict the best path from point A to point B fairly well, accounting not just for map distance, but also for current traffic, weather, the time of day, etc. In other words, its algorithms can replicate drivers’ subtle, local knowledge. If that knowledge was once relatively rare, then Uber’s algorithms may enable it to push down wages and erode working conditions.
  • By managing drivers’ expectations, the company may be able to maintain a high supply of drivers on the road waiting for fares. The net effect may be to lower wages, since the company only pays drivers when they are ferrying passengers.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Finally, new monitoring technologies can help firms to shunt workers outside of their legal boundaries through independent contracting, subcontracting, and franchising. Various economic theories suggest that firms tend to bring workers in-house as employees rather than contracting for their services—and therefore tend to accept the legal obligations and financial costs that go along with using employees rather than contractors—when they lack reliable information about workers’ proclivities, or where their work performance is difficult to monitor.
  • This suggests, in my mind, a strategy of worker empowerment and deliberative governance rather than command-and-control regulation. At the firm or workplace level, new forms of unionization and collective bargaining could address the everyday invasions of privacy or erosions of autonomy that arise through technological monitoring. Workers might block new monitoring tools that they feel are unduly intrusive. Or they might accept more extensive monitoring in exchange for greater pay or more reasonable hours.
  •  
    "Companies around the world are dreaming up a new generation of technologies designed to monitor their workers-from Amazon's new employee wristbands, to Uber's recording whether its drivers are holding their phones rather than mounting them, to "Worksmart," a new productivity tool that takes photos of workers every ten minutes via their webcams. Technologies like these can erode workplace privacy and encourage discrimination. Without disregarding the importance of those effects, I want to focus in this post on how employers can use new monitoring technologies to drive down wages or otherwise disempower workers as a class. I'll use examples from Uber, not because Uber is exceptional in this regard - it most certainly is not - but rather because it is exemplary."
Aurialie Jublin

Les sociétés VTC craignent une baisse massive du nombre de chauffeurs - 0 views

  •  
    Le gouvernement nie que l'application de la loi Grandguillaume puisse induire 10 000 pertes d'emplois. Les syndicats demandent la création d'un tarif minimum.
Aurialie Jublin

Avec Uber et Airbnb, les travailleurs indépendants sont heureux, mais… | Fren... - 0 views

  • Les 4 profils d’indépendants Les «free agents», qui ont volontairement choisi de se mettre à leur compte et pour qui le travail indépendant est la première source de revenu, qui représentent 30% des cas.  Les «casual earners», qui ont recours au travail indépendant pour compléter leurs revenus, qui pèsent pour 40% du total. C'est le profil le plus répandu.  Les «reluctants», qui tirent la plus grosse part de leurs revenus du travail indépendant mais qui préfèreraient avoir un poste salarié, 14% des cas.  Et enfin les «financially strapped», contraints d'avoir recours à du travail indépendant en plus d'un autre emploi pour faire face à leurs charges, qui représentent 16% des cas. 
  • le digital et plus particulièrement l'avènement des plateformes ont profondément modifié la façon dont les travailleurs indépendants s'organisent. Accès à une base de clients potentiels bien plus importante, information accessible en temps réel, mises en relation plus pertinentes: les avantages de ces plateformes ont déjà convaincu près de 15% des indépendants, et ce n'est que le début si l'on en croit McKinsey. 
  • En terme de satisfaction au travail, sans surprise les indépendants ayant choisi leur statut volontairement (la majorité des cas donc) sont bien plus satisfaits de leurs conditions de travail que les autres. Parmi les éléments qui poussent les «casual earners» à avoir recours à du travail indépendant en parallèle de leur emploi, on trouve l'autonomie, l'atmosphère de travail, le fait d'être son propre patron, les horaires de travail adaptables et la possibilité de travailler où on le souhaite. 
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • A l'inverse, les travailleurs indépendants qui n'ont pas choisi leur statut déplorent le manque de sécurité des revenus, et un niveau de rémunération qu'ils considèrent comme faible. Ils apprécient en revanche le contenu de leurs missions, leur autonomie, l'atmosphère de travail, ainsi que la flexibilité qui caractérise le travail indépendant (horaires et lieu de travail). 
  •  
    "Près de 162 millions de travailleurs aux Etats-Unis et en Europe ont aujourd'hui un statut d'indépendant, soit 20 à 30% de la population active dans ces deux zones gégographiques, selon l'étude «Independant work: Choice, necessity, and the gig economy» réalisée par McKinsey. "
Aurialie Jublin

Apploitation in a city of instaserfs | Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - 0 views

  • I signed up for as many sharing economy jobs as I could, but they’re not really jobs. I was never an employee; I was a “partner,” or a “hero” or even a “ninja” depending on the app. Sharing economy companies are just middlemen, connecting independent contractors to customers. When I signed up to work with (not for) these apps, I was essentially starting my own ride-sharing/courier business.
  • We do still have a boss. It just isn’t a person. It’s an algorithm.
  • The standard ride-sharing or courier app’s business model looks something like this:  When introducing your app into a new city, take heavy losses by over-paying drivers and under-charging customers. Offer drivers cash bonuses to get their friends to sign up. Once you’ve got a steady supply of drivers invested in the app, start lowering their pay. 
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • The idea is to reward loyalty and prevent drivers from having Uber and Lyft open at the same time. The thing is, if you’re working 40 or 50 hours a week with one company, that looks a lot less like a gig and a lot more like full-time employment.
  • In Los Angeles, September 2014, a group of Lyft drivers burned their pink mustaches in protest of the pay cuts. These kinds of actions aren’t very common because most of us don’t know our co-workers and there is no physical location to congregate. Lyft doesn’t allow their drivers at the head office. The main place for “sharing economy” workers to connect is through online forums and Facebook groups
  • Yes, people have been kicked off Postmates for complaining. I’ve talked to them. And yes, the official Postmates courier group on Facebook is censored to erase anything that could be perceived as a complaint. But more importantly it’s clear that Postmates is not preparing its workers for the realities of life as an independent contractor. Many are shocked about how much they have to pay in taxes and how little they’re making doing the work. There are plenty of screenshots showing that some are making less than minimum wage.
  • I ended up having to take on all kinds of little expenses like these. It’s part of the risk of starting your own business. That time, I just had to buy a $3 froyo but it can be a lot worse (parking tickets in San Francisco can be over $80). Oftentimes you have to choose between parking illegally or being late with an order.
  • All the risk falls onto the worker and the company is free of liability—despite the placard being an explicit suggestion that it’s okay to break the law if that’s what you’ve got to do to get the order done on time. 
  • Postmates responded by “updating” the app to a “blind system” in which we could still accept or reject jobs, but without enough information to determine whether it would be worth our time or not (e.g., a huge grocery store order). To make sure we accept jobs quickly without analyzing them, the app plays an extremely loud and annoying beeping noise designed specifically to harass couriers into submitting to the algorithm.
  • One of the best companies I worked for is called Washio. I picked up dirty laundry and delivered clean laundry. It was the best paying and least stressful of all the apps I worked with that month because there was no illusion of choice. Washio tells you exactly what to do and you do it. It is simple and honest. But it also betrays the spirit of the independent contractor, and that’s important for a number of reasons.
  • Plenty of people requested that I drop off their food at the door. Customers grow to love apps that make the worker anonymous. That way, you don’t have to feel guilty about having servants.
  •  
    L'auteur de l'article parle de son expérience du "travail" via l'économie des plateforme.
Aurialie Jublin

#Delivery : Le destin de Take Eat Easy pourrait-il devenir la norme ? - Maddyness - 0 views

  • Il faut ainsi, pour chaque startup, intégrer dans ses frais la logistique (les livreurs), le service client, mais également les frais liés aux “dispatcheurs” chargés de répartir les livreurs selon les commandes, au recrutement de livreurs, au matériel, etc. Des coûts qui, mis bout à bout, dépassent de loin les gains réalisés par la startup.
  • Résultat : une marge contributive négative très importante, si importante que même en envisageant des économies à l’échelle, le temps, la diminution de l’intensité concurrentielle, ceux-ci semblent voués à l’échec, en tout cas sans investisseurs pour les appuyer.
  •  
    "L'annonce de la mort de Take Eat Easy a jeté la semaine dernière un pavé dans la mare de la livraison à domicile. Si la nouvelle en a surpris plus d'un, elle a pointé la difficulté des startups qui se sont lancées dans ce marché ultra-concurrentiel. Mais toutes les startups concurrentes de Take Eat Easy sont-elles vouées à disparaitre ? "
Aurialie Jublin

La chute de Take Eat Easy, une mauvaise nouvelle pour la bulle internet? | Slate.fr - 0 views

  • Au bout du compte, seule une toute petite minorité des projets arrive en position hégémonique, puisque le principe est qu’il n’y a qu’un vainqueur par secteur (la plateforme arrivée en premier rafle tout le marché, puisque personne n’a besoin d’un deuxième Uber, d’un deuxième Airbnb ou d’un deuxième Blablacar, avec un peu moins de chambres à louer, de chauffeurs disponibles ou de covoitureurs potentiels). L’aventure s’arrête donc au moment où les équipes se retrouvent à cours d'argent et que plus personne n'est prêt à parier un nouveau tour de table. Et plus la croissance aura été forte et rapide, plus le bordel laissé derrière sera impressionnant, ce qu’on a mesuré aux réactions outrées de restaurateurs ou de livreurs apprenant qu’ils ne seraient pas payés pour le mois de juillet.
  • Faut-il y voir un début d'éclatement de bulle? Difficile de tirer des conclusions, mais la succession de plusieurs annonces de redressement judiciaires d'autres start-up médiatiques comme Take Eat Easy soulève la question selon le rédacteur en chef du magazine En-Contact, spécialisé dans la relation client, qui écrit dans un billet d'humeur: «On peut se poser la question tant la capacité à brûler du cash de ces entreprises a été réelle, voire parfois stratosphérique et ferait sourire le moindre patron de TPE ou PME dont l’obsession quotidienne est le niveau de sa trésorerie, et qui prend des mesures de sauvegarde dès lors que son compte professionnel est proche de zéro ou déjà en dessous.» Les modèles grand public sont aussi plus sexy et simples à comprendre (en tout cas, c'est l'impression qu'ils peuvent donner), et cet aspect a tendance à attirer les «meetoo» et les «copycats», comme l'explique Stéphane Schultz, attirés par la le succès de la première phase de recherche de modèle économique, et qui créent «des services identiques et “adaptés” à un pays ou une situation particulière.»
  •  
    "Ce modèle implique une tension permanente entre le risque inhérent de l'activité, qui dépense beaucoup d'argent, et le potentiel de valorisation, lié à une forte croissance: «Il s'agit d'un choix à faire entre croissance et rentabilité. Soit on est rentable très vite avec une faible croissance, soit c'est l'inverse.» «On ne peut pas à la fois reprocher à l'équipe de Take Eat Easy de s'être plantée, reconnaît l'investisseur, et encenser Uber qui lève des milliards», car dans les deux cas la logique est la même, même si les ordres de grandeur n'ont rien à voir: l'argent levé accélère l'hyper-croissance au prix d'énormes dépenses. «Uber est toujours dans sa phase de croissance», ajoute Stéphane Schultz, et son expansion toujours en cours."
Aurialie Jublin

Le travail low cost - emission radio France Culture - 1 views

  •  
    "La journée tristement banale d'une hôtesse de l'air dans une compagnie low-cost et d'un livreur à vélo ubérisé. "
Aurialie Jublin

Uber n'existera plus dans 3 ans - 0 views

  • Au final la seule variable concurrentielle actuelle de cette économie est le prix payé à sa main-d’oeuvre – les chauffeurs VTC – main-d’oeuvre sensée être indépendante et avoir un « esprit d’entreprise ». Or un chef d’entreprise ne se lève pour travailler que s’il espère un gain supérieur (en argent, en temps ou en liberté) à un travail salarié sans risque. En moins de trois ans les mécanismes de l’absence de barrière à l’entrée et l’équilibre impossible de ce marché ont fait basculer l’intérêt de l’entrepreneur indépendant chauffeur VTC de très positif à négatif. Il partira dès qu’il trouvera un meilleur système de rémunération.
  • je fais la prédiction que « l’ubérisation » de la société trouvera sa véritable éclosion à travers le logiciel/service open-source (on ne parlera alors plus « d’ubérisation »). Ce serait un paradoxe apparent, mais en fin de compte assez logique (et déjà en application dans plusieurs domaines comme l’informatique) : tout d’abord parce que l’univers des professionnels indépendants est plus proche de l’état d’esprit libertaire (être libre de son temps, ne pas avoir de patron) qui anime l’univers de l’open-source que de l’univers libéral (concurrence libre) qui est celui des sociétés qui font travailler les indépendants, et ensuite parce qu’il semble logique que de particulier à particulier le principe de suppression de l’intermédiaire devienne la règle. Il est probable qu’émergera un jour un moteur informatique open-source global pour organiser tous les différents services entre particuliers.
  •  
    "La double faiblesse qui va être fatale à Uber et qui va conduire à sa fin prochaine - et à toutes les sociétés qui suivent son modèle - est la suivante : sa technologie est trop facilement reproductible, avec au bout du compte des barrières faibles à l'entrée pour de nouveaux concurrents, et il va lui être impossible de trouver un équilibre sur le moyen/long terme entre les offres de travail pour les chauffeurs « Ubers », leur juste rémunération et la demande des clients."
Aurialie Jublin

Uber's Augmented Workers - Uber Screeds - Medium - 0 views

  • Uber has long claimed it’s a technology company, not a transportation company. Uber’s drivers are promoted as entrepreneurs and classified as independent contractors. The company claims to provide only a platform/app that enables drivers to be connected with passengers; as an intermediary, the company relies on the politics of platforms to elude responsibility as a traditional employer, as well as regulatory regimes designed to govern traditional taxi businesses.
  • Drivers must submit to a system that molds their interactions, controls their behavior, sets and changes rates unilaterally, and is generally structured to minimize the power of driver (“partner”) voices. Drivers make inquiries to outsourced community support representatives that work on Uber’s behalf, but their responses are based on templates or FAQs.
  • Uber uses surge pricing to lure drivers to work at a particular place at a particular time, without guaranteeing the validity of the surge incentive if they do follow it. Surge is produced through an algorithmic assessment of supply and demand and is subject to constant dynamism. The rate that drivers are paid is based on the passenger’s location, not their own. Even when they travel to an active surge zone, they risk receiving passengers at lower or higher surge than is initially advertised, or getting fares from outside the surge zone. Drivers will be locked out of the system for varying periods of time, like 10 minutes, 30 minutes, etc. for declining too many rides. They also get warnings for “manipulating” surge.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Uber drivers are “free” to login or log-out to work at will, but their ability to make choices that benefit their own interests, such as accepting higher-fare passengers, is severely limited.
  • To a significant degree, Uber has successfully automated many of the processes involved in managing a large workforce, comprised of at at least 400 000 active drivers in the U.S. alone, according to Uber’s last public estimate. However, automation is not to be confused with independence. Uber has built a system that leverages significant control over how workers do their jobs, even as that control is structured to be indirect and semi-automated, such as through nudges, algorithmic labor logistics, the rating system, etc.
  •  
    "Summary Uber has done a lot of things to language to communicate a strong message of distance between itself and its relationship to Uber drivers. Uber insists drivers should be classified as independent contractors, labelled driver-partners, and promoted as entrepreneurs, although the company faces legal challenges over issues of worker misclassification. Beyond its attempts to label work as a type of "sharing" in the so-called "sharing economy," Uber's protracted efforts to celebrate the independence and freedom of drivers have evolved into a sophisticated policy push to design a new classification of worker that would accommodate Uber's business model. The emergent classification, "independent worker," does not acknowledge the significant control Uber leverages over how drivers do their job."
Thierry Nabeth

Uber Is Not the Future of Work -- The Atlantic - 0 views

  •  
    Gig-enabling apps are a distraction from the uncertainties that affect far more people: Will workers get paid enough and are their jobs safe?
Aurialie Jublin

L'algorithme d'Uber, encore plus contraignant qu'un vrai chef - Rue89 - L'Obs - 0 views

  •  
    "« le système d'emploi flexible par mise en relation numérique et algorithmique d'Uber construit des formes de surveillance et de contrôle qui résultent en assymétries d'informations et de pouvoir pour les travailleurs. Le système Uber, les algorithmes, les Community Support Representatives, les passagers, les évaluations de performance semi-automatisées, et tout le système de notation agissent ensemble pour créer un substitut au contrôle managérial direct sur les chauffeurs. »"
Aurialie Jublin

Homejoy, premier échec majeur de « l'Uber-économie » | Silicon 2.0 - 0 views

  •  
    La chute de Homejoy a été précipitée par quatre actions en justice. Comme Uber, l'entreprise s'est construite sur le recours à des travailleurs indépendants, ce qui lui permet de fortement limiter ses coûts (pas de salaire fixe, pas de charges sociales...) et de gagner en flexibilité. Les plaintes déposées contre Homejoy réclamaient la reclassification de ces travailleurs indépendants, pour leur accorder le statut de salariés. Une perspective qui aurait totalement bouleversé le modèle économique de l'entreprise.
abrugiere

Qui sont les travailleurs de l'"Uber economy" ? - JDN - 1 views

  •  
    Revenu à 18 dollars par heure aux Etats-Unis. Il est plus élevé dans le secteur du "revenu passif" (location sur Airbnb) et dans les transports (VTC) : 25 dollars en moyenne par heure. 38,3% des travailleurs de l'économie on-demand se disent étudiants tandis que 35,3% font des plateformes de services leur activité principale. Preuve de l'explosion du modèle, 62,6% des répondants ont rejoint une société de services à la demande pendant les douze derniers mois, contre 16,2% seulement il y a plus de trois ans. Les chercheurs ont demandé aux travailleurs d'indiquer dans quel secteur les sociétés de services à la demande pour lesquels ils travaillent se situent. Les "travaux manuels", comme les services de plomberie ou de ménage, par exemple, arrivent en tête. Suivent les sociétés de transports comme les VTC, puis la livraison, et enfin les plateformes qui permettent aux utilisateurs d'engranger un "revenu passivement", comme Airbnb en louant son appartement. 49,4% des travailleurs indépendants inscrits sur des plateformes sont titulaires d'un diplôme universitaire.- Selon l'étude menée par Requests for Startups, les travailleurs de l'économie à la demande sont plutôt des hommes (72,7%), jeunes (70% ont entre 18 et 34 ans), célibataires (65,7%). 
Aurialie Jublin

Why On-Demand Shipping Service Shyp Is Turning Its Couriers Into Employees | Fast Compa... - 0 views

  • Shyp involves multiple layers of complexity—once it picks up an item, it takes it to a warehouse, packs it up, then hands it off to a major courier such as UPS for delivery—but it's the couriers who define the face-to-face experience for customers. "Our service has so many touch points—showing up at your home and shipping anything anywhere in the world," says CEO and cofounder Kevin Gibbon. "It could be really expensive, like a painting or something like that. We felt that given how complicated the actual job is, the best course is to transition these folks."
  • Still, by moving away from the contractor model, the company gains the ability to exert more control over the Shyp experience without fear of legal repercussions. It can get more involved in training and coaching couriers, managing the hours they work, and generally treating them like full-blown team members rather than freelancers. It will also begin to pay workers' compensation, unemployment, and Social Security taxes for couriers. They'll continue to use their own vehicles, but Shyp will cover costs such as fuel.
  • Aren't employees more expensive than contractors? Sure, which is one big reason why on-demand startups have shied away from hiring them. But Gibbon says that Shyp's satellite drivers and warehouse workers are already employees, so hiring couriers isn't a dramatic departure. And its profit margins are such that there's room for the extra cost. "We felt that with everything we can bring operationally, it'll be a net positive," he told me. "If someone has a better experience, they're much more likely to tell someone else about it."
  •  
    "But that's about to change. Shyp is shifting from signing up couriers as contractors to hiring them as staffers, with the closer ties and legal obligations that such a relationship carries. The new approach will start in the next city Shyp enters: Chicago, where it plans to be up and running this summer. Couriers in the company's current markets-Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, and San Francisco-will transition from contractor status to employees on January 1, 2016."
Aurialie Jublin

affordance.info: Même pas peur : le salaire de l'Uber. - 0 views

  • Au-delà des avancées technologiques qui permettront l'automatisation d'un certain nombre de tâches, d'emplois ou de métiers, les critères d'une "uberisation" sont clairement posés dans cette interview d'Olivier Ezratty. En 1ère ligne des "uberisables" on trouve : "ceux qui génèrent de l'insatisfaction client" (des médecins aux plombiers pour - par exemple - raccourcir les délais d'attente et favoriser la mise en contact directe) "ceux susceptibles d'être désintermédiés par des plateformes d'évaluation", c'est à dire ceux qui nécessitent une forte évaluation client distribuée en pair à pair (ici les plateformes sont déjà en place pour l'hôtellerie et la restauration par exemple, mais pourraient s'étendre à d'autres "métiers) "ceux qui sont dans une situation de quasi-monopole" (les taxis donc, mais aussi, dans un tout autre registre ... l'éducation) "les métiers de service dans l'aide à la personne" (de la livraison à domicile en passant par la recherche de nounous ou de cours particuliers)
  • A l'aube du 21ème siècle, c'est la même question qu'il faut poser une fois acté le remplacement d'un certain nombre de tâches et de fonctions par des automates / algorithmes / robots, etc. Ces nouvelles formes de "travail journalier à la tâche", ce "salariat algorithmique" sera-t-il un privilège ou un droit ?  S'il doit devenir un privilège (c'est pour l'instant ce vers quoi nous nous dirigeons), alors il ne permettra qu'à quelques-uns d'accentuer leurs rentes en déployant une idéologie libérale devant laquelle notre actuel capitalisme dérégulé fera office de gentillet kolkhoze ; le modèle du Mechanical Turk d'Amazon deviendra la norme, on cotisera tous à la sécurité sociale de Google, nos points retraites seront chez Amazon, notre banque s'appellera Apple et Facebook fera office de mairie et d'état-civil. Fucking Brave New World. Pour qu'il puisse exister comme un droit, alors, plutôt que de lâcher 200 képis à la poursuite de pauvres auto-entrepreneurs ou d'interdire une application, c'est aujourd'hui que notre classe politique doit lire du Michel Bauwens (cf supra), c'est son rôle de faire en sorte que LE Droit puise offrir à chaque citoyen la possibilité de réinstaller au coeur d'un système outrancièrement individualiste l'horizon d'une représentation et d'une négociation collective possible. C'est aujourd'hui également que la question de savoir ce qui relève du bien commun inaliénable, dans nos usages sociaux comme dans nos ressources naturelles, doit être posée.  Bref, Candide avait raison : il nous faut cultiver notre jardin. Mais le cultiver en commun. Le cultiver comme un bien commun. Sinon on va tous se faire uberiser. A sec.
  •  
    "Du côté de l'uberisation du monde et de nos amis les taxis, les derniers jours ont été riches d'enseignements et ont accessoirement permis à ma navritude (c'est un peu comme la bravitude) d'atteindre des niveaux jusqu'ici inégalés devant tant d'incurie politique."
Aurialie Jublin

UberPOP : pourquoi taxis, VTC et internautes doivent s'unir contre Uber - 0 views

  •  
    "Lorsque taxis, VTC ou prestataires UberPOP se font la guerre, Uber regarde ceux qui s'affrontent comme autant de proies qu'il entend abattre les unes après les autres. Plus qu'un conflit entre des professionnels, c'est un symptôme d'une société malade, qui doit choisir sa voie. Le capitalisme décomplexé qui fait de certaines plateformes les nouveaux seigneurs d'un monde féodal moderne, ou un autre modèle de société à inventer, en restant uni ?"
Aurialie Jublin

Amazon, Uber: le travail en miettes et l'économie du partage des restes | Sla... - 1 views

  • Dans un contexte de pénurie d’emploi, les services qui permettent à des jeunes, des étudiants, des retraités, des femmes au foyer, des chômeurs de trouver un petit revenu peuvent constituer, faute de mieux, un rempart contre la pauvreté. Cette «fonction sociale» est d'ailleurs toujours mise en avant par ces entreprises de mise en relation entre offreurs et demandeurs. 
  • Au rayon des semi-bonnes nouvelles, l’entreprise Instacart, un service de shopping en ligne sur le modèle de la mise en relation d’un client et d’un «picker» qui fait les courses et les livre, vient d’annoncer que ses contractants indépendants seraient désormais salariés de l’entreprise: elle a invoqué pour expliquer sa décision le besoin de former et de superviser ces derniers, ce qui n’était pas compatible avec leur statut d’indépendants.
  • En revanche, on ne voit guère de propositions de rupture ni de résistance ferme face à ce système injuste qui accumule des fortunes colossales tout en imposant de nouvelles règles du jeu anti-sociales et irresponsables. Après le processus d’évolution historique vers une sécurité accrue des travailleurs, mouvement d’amélioration quasi-continu des conditions de travail et des rémunérations, le retournement serait en marche, nous faisant risquer collectivement de revenir à des régulations du travail régressives: travail à la tâche, «au jour la journée», avec quelques guildes de travailleurs en guise de contre-pouvoir et de force de négociation vis-à-vis des plateformes. Et on peine à voir ce qu'il y a de si enthousiasmant dans ce modèle.
  •  
    "Attention à ne pas trop s'enflammer pour les nouvelles formes de micro-travail ou de travail semi-amateur qu'essaient de généraliser les entreprises du secteur numérique."
Aurialie Jublin

Pour la Californie, les chauffeurs des VTC Uber sont des salariés - L'Express... - 2 views

  • Uber prétend être une "plateforme neutre d'un point de vue technologique" pour ses chauffeurs indépendants, mais c'est elle qui pose la plupart des conditions d'embauche, a fait remarquer l'auditeur de l'Etat Stephanie Barrett. Uber et ses dirigeants "sont impliqués dans chaque aspect des opérations" y compris les enquêtes menées sur les futurs chauffeurs et leur renvoi éventuel si leur évaluation s'avère trop faible, a-t-elle ajouté. Pour cette raison, Uber doit "indemniser son employé pour tout ce que l'employé dépense dans le cadre de ses fonctions". Mme Berwick avait demandé à être remboursée notamment des frais de péage. 
  •  
    "La Californie a estimé que les chauffeurs des voitures de la société de services de transport Uber (VTC) étaient des salariés et non des travailleurs indépendants, une décision qui remet en cause le modèle économique de la start-up."
1 - 20 of 25 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page