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ksteffener

Implementation in a Secondary Classroom (Articles) - 2 views

  • At the end of the project they can choose how they will present their findings.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      In my classroom, this might be allowing students to choose themes or subjects for their final projects while using the techniques we are studying.  
    • alissahansen
       
      I find that the possibilities are endless in the English classroom as well. I use RAFTs often where students choose the role of themselves as the writer, their audience, the format of the writing, and the topic, and they excel with this. With English, work is not just organized around a work of literature, it's really much more about what is gained through that exposure to said literature. This really helps makes giving choices possible in this type of environment. It is hard to give much choice when students need to be able to write a research paper in MLA format, however. They do have the opportunity to choose a topic, resources (I give them some, but do not force them to use the ones I provide because they are pretty knowledgeable when it comes to tech resources). The research paper is probably the most difficult unit for students and I think it is because it is so rigid of an assignment. I would love to offer more choice with this, but I am not sure if that would be possible. Choice in my classroom relates to learner interest as well. I always make sure to offer options that appeal to all, whether it is acting out a scene, writing an alternative ending, creating a Facebook account for a character, a podcast, writing a blog, or creating a comic book storyboard. 
  • It is a messier way to teach, though it takes more organization on the teacher’s part, not less. You really have to be on top of things to allow the students choice since now there is more than one “right” way of doing something in the classroom. And Julie Ison (the team’s mathematics teacher) adds, “You have to have a principal who understands that when he walks into a roo
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This is very true.  As I attempt to make sense of this for my classroom, I am realizing the amount of prep work that is involved.  I realized I can continue to develop the resources that I make available to students, but I want it to be meaty to begin with.  
    • edamisch
       
      I am often overwhelmed by the amount of resources there are for Spanish since there are 20+ Spanish speaking countries.  It is often difficult to know where to start since I write my own curriculum. 
    • bleza66
       
      This is also true in the special education environment. Each student is working individually on the subject they need assistance with or on an IEP goal area. It is often difficult for people who are not familiar with what we do to see what we are working towards. 
  • The classroom is more disorganized, with one student working one way, another a different way—you get the picture.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This quote really spoke to me.  This is often what an art room looks like.  To a degree it is already personalized, but it can be more personal for the students.  That is my goal. It is funny because so many times administrators assume I can do more because I 'just' give my students a project and they work on it all week, so of course I must have all kinds of time.  But really the classroom is constantly in motion, I just don't stand at the front and direct all the motion.  It really does take an understanding administrator for this to work well.  
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      This spoke to me as well. Working in an alternative education environment, I may have 10 students working on 10 different classes at any one time. Some may be working on-line while others are working out of a text book. Others may be in the hallway doing some fitness activities and still others curled up in a comfy chair reading a book. I, in the meantime, am usually traveling from student to student providing assistance. There is never a dull moment, that is for sure! And yes, an understanding and supportive administration is KEY!!
    • ksteffener
       
      What is normal to the spider is chaos to the fly. That is how I view my job! I love when administration walks in shakes their head and leave!
  • ...51 more annotations...
  • They’ll have to post a couple of responses—and post a couple of responses to responses— as part of the class. That’s going to get them trading ideas about the literature we read in class
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This whole quote reminds me of the importance of critique. Implementing this method of teaching really makes critique even more important.  It also allows students to learn from each other and explore ideas and techniques even deeper.   
    • bleza66
       
      I really like this idea because it allows deeper thought and more meaningful conversations to happen. I can see where this would lead to larger conversations with students and the class as a whole. 
  • Coach Debbie Camp remembers with a chuckle what most of the kids said—they loved doing it because it was a break from math!
    • lisalillian311
       
      Amazing comment from the students!  They didn't even know they were learning!
  • choices that promote feelings of control, purpose, and competence are likely to be more motivating than choices that do not.
    • lisalillian311
       
      What if a student doubts his choice to the point of frustration?  How can the student be redirected to make a confident choice that will turn into a learning experience? As the teacher, I would be afraid to over-assist a student with choices, if that student is not confident in their learning.
    • alissahansen
       
      I agree! I think students need to learn how they work best and to make choices based on that. I think this is hard for some of the students that I work with. It can be difficult when students just are not used to being given choice, then all of a sudden they are asked to choose what is best for them... I think there are some that will struggle(successfully and  otherwise) and some will be even resistant to the choices offered, but students will learn how to make choices that best suit them. It just takes time. We cannot just expect them to make the best choices right away. (Alissa Hansen)
  • “without deep and flexible understanding of content, teachers are handicapped in the critical task of helping diverse students find points of access to the school curriculum”
    • lisalillian311
       
      As teachers need more depth of knowledge in their respective subjects, I would think that universities would begin requiring more courses to "cover" everything in a given subject.
  • A sense of competence
  • sense
    • lisalillian311
       
      I especially like "competence" as a part of this formula.  Students need to feel like they know how to learn and learn how to know.
    • spfantz
       
      Teaching meta-cognition is a life-long skill they will use forever.
  • Not anymore. Now she says, “One of you needs to move. You decide.” It is less stressful to her and focuses the students on what they need to do to regain control.
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      I love using this technique when students aren't being productive when sitting together. I'm all about giving students choices and then they learn they have to deal with the consequences of their choices. I've had students ask me if they can leave early. I always tell them, "It's your choice, but be prepared to live with the consequences of not meeting attendance and progress goals."
    • marydermit
       
      I have use the you decide but I really like your answer to students about leaving early.  I am going to try it out this year.
    • bleza66
       
      I also use the "it's your choice" technique. It is important for student to take responsibility for their own actions and learn that sometimes the consequences of making that choice is not worth it. Real life learning at its best. 
    • ascallon
       
      I use this quite often also.  It puts students in control of consequences.  It's interesting to hear their reflections when graduation requirements aren't met.  Most take responsibility for not attending and getting work done.
    • ksteffener
       
      This sounds a lot like Love and Logic to me.
  • “One of the things I had to learn recently was to let go and allow the kids to experience the consequences of their choices.
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      I see this as my biggest struggle in the day-to-day happenings in my classroom. Many of my students have already failed based on the choices they have made in the past. They attend the alternative program as what some may consider a last chance. I feel like I'm not doing my job if I "let go and allow failure." I guess in my eyes, if they fail, I fail. My principal has told me numerous times over the years that there will come a time where you just have to let go.
    • katie50009
       
      Lisa--This is a struggle for me as well. The feeling of "if they fail, I fail" is something very real for educators because we care so deeply about our students. 
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      I oftentimes feel like we, as educators, care more about our students' education than the student does. It's an uphill battle I face every year...not with all of them, but there are always a few.
    • spfantz
       
      I understand allowing a student to fail, but it seems silly to allow a student to fail a core class because they were unable to problem solve or troubleshoot a technology issue. I think we need to evaluate what it is that we want students to come away with. Also, project based curriculum can often times be lengthy, so I would fear students we allow to fail could loose weeks of learning.
    • ksteffener
       
      I have heard the same thing and I really believe that because we take our job so personally- failure is not ok. I always try and focus on the success not the failure. You may have failed the class but you did this this and this right.
  • Choices like this honor divergent ways of thinking and, in doing so, help promote strong feelings of competence in students.
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      I enjoy seeing students come up with different ways to solve the same problem. For those that struggle, I try to model a few different techniques and then have them pick the technique that makes the most sense to them. Sometimes they come up with something totally different and I'm OK with that.
    • alissahansen
       
      I like the idea of having students pick a technique that makes most sense for them and that was modeled because if I see students struggle, it is usually because they just don't know where to start. Not every student will have that innate ability of taking the initiative. I know teaching freshmen that this is an area students really struggle with because they just don't trust themselves and moving forward can be paralytic because of it. (Alissa Hansen)
  • Photo Story
    • edamisch
       
      Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses - I usually let students choose how they want to present their information too.  Unless I'm trying to teach a specific skill such as how to create a strong power point presentation, where everyone would be required to create one. 
    • spfantz
       
      I would love to see the rubric aligned with standards and benchmarks to see how they reach goals through activities and through their culminating project.
  • give my students a choice:
    • edamisch
       
      For my 6th graders Spanish speaking country capital unit for example, I have four ways that they can choose from to study for the quiz - two technology based (quizlet.com and a youtube video) and two more paper based - worksheets and flashcards.  This works well in case kids don't have internet at home. 
  • d the
  • The kids can choose any one of those methods as long as they follow a rubric that I created about what I am looking for.”
    • jenniferlb
       
      I love it when I have the opportunity to allow students to choose how they will demonstrate their learning. We use one common rubric to suit multiple ways they present their information. I have found, however, that sometimes when students have freedom to choose, some are resistant to it.  Some want a specific, step-by-step set of instructions or blanks to "fill in" and having freedom to choose how they present their learning makes some uncomfortable. I find that interesting!
    • moodyh
       
      It is great when students have an opportunity to present in their own ways, but I find my students struggle with it.  I give them the opportunity to present their final financial literacy project any way they want, but most of them just wrote me a paper that covered what the rubric asked for.  I think students will need as much training as teachers to get used to individualized learning
  • Giving choice is about empowering students. It makes them feel that they are part of the process, not powerless; that’s the kind of feeling that motivates everyone.”
    • alissahansen
       
      This quote really speaks to me because it holds so much truth! It's amazing how much psychology goes into teaching! That said, choice, motivation and empowerment all go hand-in-hand. Students do so much better when they can own something (well most of the time), and when they have the opportunity to choose how they will represent their understanding to you, it also shows that you as their teacher, trust them to make that decision and I think students respond well to this. Now, sometimes students will take what they perceive as the easier approach, but they learn the consequences pretty quick. And this extends not just to those choices relating to academics, but behavior as well. I work with freshmen, who are still trying to figure out what it means to not be an eighth grader anymore, and I have found that  when it comes to discipline, giving them a choice allows them to hold themselves accountable and establishes trust. I have used, "who is going to move to a more productive place in the classroom?" often, and I have not had a situation yet where one of the students didn't make that choice. The system works for toddlers too! (Alissa Hansen)
    • marydermit
       
      Giving students choice builds a trust relationship that is so important.
    • ascallon
       
      One of my favorites is the closer to graduating, usually the closer the student sits to my desk or me.  The 1:1 time helps them get done faster.  
    • ksteffener
       
      I think getting at risk students to trust me as a teacher is the toughest thing I do. I need them to believe that I will move every obstacle I can.
  • 2. Use the technology you have.
    • jenniferlb
       
      I find this "lesson" interesting as I would think that to have a successful PLE 1:1 technology would be necessary. This allows me to think that personalized learning could become a part of traditional classrooms sooner than later!
  • ound of Kahoot
    • alissahansen
       
      This is my favorite discovery by far and students LOVE IT! It is a great way to review content with a program that has gaming qualities and offers a sense of healthy competition. Students can use phones, desktop computers or laptops to gain access to the interactive program and I will say that once you do it once, students will ask for it daily. You can even quiz students using the program and it will compile the data for you so you can enter in scores if you wanted to. I highly recommend it to all educators. It is a valuable resource, and it is free! (Alissa Hansen).
    • moodyh
       
      I love Kahoot too as a whole class assessment.  Another great (and free) resource is quizizz.  It is similar to Kahoot except that students can go through and take the quiz at their own pace instead of it being a race to see who can answer each question first.  It still compiles the data for you, but gives the students a little more privacy.
  • in a typical story unit, they can choose between just reading, and reading along as they listen to a story. They can also decide whether to annotate online or on a printed copy. They can take notes on paper or record their thoughts verbally as they analyze the story.
    • edamisch
       
      These choices are awesome!  Underlining and writing notes in the margins online is way different than on paper!  
    • katie50009
       
      I like these ideas as well. So simple and yet it gives choice to students. I like real, specific ideas to begin the implementation of PL--actually, I feel like I was not as far behind on giving PL a try because I am using strategies such as these. Feels like a postiive boost!
  • Choose the best content delivery method.
    • alissahansen
       
      I love utilizing technology (freetech4teachers.com is a site I visit often), but I sometimes struggle because there is just so much out there. I do a lot of playing around with different programs and resources before introducing them to students, but I do feel overwhelmed by it all at times and I am sure students feel the same way. I think this is a very important statement because with the wealth of information/tools out there, students should have the opportunity and be able to decide what is going to work best for them and teachers need to make decisions about the best tech tools to get them there. This is easier said than done as every summer I have about 100 new tech ideas to incorporate and feel there is no time to do it all...talk about cognitive overload! (Alissa Hansen)
  • skip forward, pause or rewind as needed until they get the lesson.
    • edamisch
       
      Great features 
    • marydermit
       
       I want try short videos with pharmacy tech students as an  choice to reinforce some of the key concepts with math applications.  Those that need to review can and those who have it can move on.
  • Kahoot,
    • edamisch
       
      This is big in my building. (middle school) 
    • marydermit
       
      I used it this past year to review drug classifications with pharmacy tech students. They loved it.  I want to add more units this year.
  • AP students would each have produced their own 10-page research paper.
    • edamisch
       
      Personally, I'm glad I had to write two 10 page papers on the topic of my choice for AP College English my senior year of high school, since papers of that length were the norm as a Spanish/Art/Education major in college.  It was good preparation.  
    • juliefulton
       
      I agree, we do not want to 'cheat' our students from learning and practicing valuable skills needed for success in college and/or their careers.
    • spfantz
       
      This would be a huge undertaking for some of my students. I wonder what types of supports and assistance is offered to students who need help.
  • use their fantasy football stats during class
    • edamisch
       
      cool idea! 
  • encourage you.
    • edamisch
       
      The above reminds me of the example "Day in the Life" assignment.  The depth of this cross curricular unit is great, but what about breadth?  Would everything be covered?  This is a concern of mine with time consuming projects.  
  • Imagine that you are a student at Tidewater High School, a fictitious comprehensive American high school that is organized into small learning communities.
    • alissahansen
       
      This a great resource for developing a personal plan and establishes a useful blueprint so one can see what a truly personalized learning environment would look like for: the student, teacher, administrator and even a parent! This is a resource I am going to use for my personalized plan. I especially like the breakdown from the student's experience, the purpose, what the structure of the class content would look like, assessment, and there is a useful checklist that once could use to assess yourself on implementation. (Alissa Hansen)
  • I feel that I am on this blended learning journey with them, and I truly believe it has made us all more engaged in our work and more focused learners.
    • jenniferlb
       
      These final sentences really sum up what I would love to be able to say about the work that I someday hope to do!
    • emilyzelenovich
       
      I agree completely. I want to know that students find value in meaning in the work we do in my class, and I want to know that I have helped prepare them for the world after high school. 
  • Students do not always need to work at their desks. For example, one teacher noticed students were getting restless during independent reading in class. They became more motivated and less fidgety when the teacher allowed them to find a comfortable place to read. Some students chose to remain at their desks, others crawled under the desks, and still others found comfortable places elsewhere. Even simple choices like this can give students a meaningful sense of control.
  • Students
    • jenniferlb
       
      Depending on the unit of study, the students in my 9th and 10th grade English classes are given regular reading days to enjoy the novels they are reading.  I love it when they ask to move around the room to get comfortable to read.  When they're given the choice of where to read, I agree that it does give them a "meaningful sense of control."
  • even in small ways, of their own education.
    • katie50009
       
      The phrase "even in small ways" really caught mu attention. Instead of focusing on what we can't do and can't change, I need to focus on baby steps of implementing change, one step and one student at a time. Over time it will become more natural for the teacher and student to change the traditional roles of schools and really become engaged in learning.
  • t is the purposeful design of instruction to combine face-to-face teaching, technology-assisted instruction and collaboration to leverage each student’s learning style and interests for deeper learning. When done right, it meets several of the ISTE Standards for Students and Teachers while leading to a more rigorous, challenging, engaging and thought-provoking curriculum.
    • katie50009
       
      I think some of the hesitation for teachers to work more fully in a PL modeled is the issue of rigor. Are students really challenging themselves? Am I giving them enough guidance and feedback to take their learning to the next level? How will I know for sure?
    • spfantz
       
      I agree, it would be difficult to gauge or measure how rigorous, challenging, and engaging each students' personalized path is for them.
  • When asked to explain the “why” behind my choices during professional learning sessions, I realized there was more to creating blended lessons than simply adding technology. Today I carefully construct my units with specific learning goals that drive the method of delivery and learning activities.
    • katie50009
       
      These statements really help me see how, as a coach, the conversations I have with teachers, and the reflections that follow, will be key to implementing PL successfully.
  • My students’ input and further pedagogical study helped me refine my lesson planning until I got it right.
    • juliefulton
       
      It is very important that we model for our students taking risks, asking for feedback, refine for improvement, and continually grow as individuals and professionals!
  • Now they have access to the full unit from the beginning, so they can gauge their own pacing and get practice in time management.
    • juliefulton
       
      Students are learning content and life skills but teacher organization of the course is important to maximize learning. If a student is confused by having access to all the course at once, they may be overwhelmed if the necessary componets are not clearly identified.
  • allowing students to pick one or two friends they would like to work with
  • Certainly, giving choice to students often means that teachers need to allow students to make their own decisions, and it can be difficult to give up this control.
    • juliefulton
       
      ...and teachers need to be open-minded to answers that are not right/wrong. Perhaps 'what-if' dialogues are right.
  • generally made every mistake you can imagine
  • “We have all these different methods of how kids can present the project,
    • ascallon
       
      My concern is how to get students to do quality projects.  Some of the things I receive are so low quality. What do I do to get the students to do more work?
  • ‘Okay. Here’s a list of choices. Choose one. As long as you follow the steps in my rubric, you’re fine.’”
    • ascallon
       
      This is how I set up projects, but get cut and paste type projects.  I would like ideas to get students to stretch their horizons.
  • technology failures
    • ascallon
       
      Technology failures get me frustrated.  The students help me so much, but I feel like a failure when I can't help them or when the technology doesn't work as planned.
    • ksteffener
       
      this is the single biggest roadblock I face. As a rural school we are without internet at least once a week
  • access on their own phones
    • ascallon
       
      Students use their own phones for research and project.  I haven't opened up to computers/tables yet.  Hopefully we will have 1:1 computers for the classroom this year.   I'm interested to see how this will change research and projects for students.  Hoping for higher level thinking skills!
  • Giving students a short list of topics with an option to create their own topic, with the teacher’s approval, often works well.
    • ascallon
       
      I do this with World History projects and end up copied text from a website or a PowerPoint with just the facts.  I would love some strategies to get students to think beyond the facts and cut and paste.
  • When activities require students to work in groups
    • ascallon
       
      A student frustration has been when the group members don't show for class.  We've tried to debate speeches and members don't show to prepare or present.  It's frustrating for the students.
    • spfantz
       
      I feel that if student interest drives the group dynamics, students won't feel socially pressured to group with their friends.
    • ksteffener
       
      This one is tough because we all have to work with different types of people and its a skill that students are lacking. I try and put groups together based on a lot of factors but knowing the students is the key to success
    • spfantz
       
      I have not heard of Photo Story or vodcasts, I'd like to learn more.
  • actionable feedback
    • spfantz
       
      I like these suggestions for quick feedback and redirection for the class.
  • t combats the dea
    • spfantz
       
      I'm not sure I'm following this statement. It seems profound but I'm not sure I understand the rationalization.
  • Okay, you’ve done this project. Show us what you’ve learned,’ and there we offer the kids choices. We might say to them, for instance, if you establish a future city on the moon, how would you prevent all these environmental problems on the moon that we have had on earth?
    • ksteffener
       
      I have found that sometimes students are overwhelmed by choices so this is where the personalization part comes into play. I want to give them choices based on what is best for them not me as the teacher.
  • he screencasts, which I create with Zaption, Screencast-o-matic and Video Ant, are better than PowerPoints because students can hear my voice instead of clicking through a silent slide deck. A
    • ksteffener
       
      This would be awesome for students with social anxiety who cannot stand in front of the room and give a presentation
  • “Your class is easy. I don’t mean simple — I mean it is easy for me to learn because I can pick assignments that let me do my best work.”
    • ksteffener
       
      this is a common misinterpretation. students feel like it is easy because they get it, not easy because its not rigourous
    • ksteffener
       
      This is the toughest part of working with at risk students. When a student isn't successful it takes a lot to motivate them and even if they are motivated they may not want to look like that to their peers.
    • ksteffener
       
      this is awesome. I would love to print this and hand it out!
joanmax

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bkoller86

PLE Articles - 2 views

  • These tools provide a medium for students to create their own learning space that is more natural and unique to their interests and learning styles.
    • djarends
       
      I like this idea with special education students. I think to have a place where they can find resources to help them is a great idea. I have provided many resources, but since they are not easily available or at least the students feel they are not, the students do not use them. I also like that they choose which ones will be helpful to them.  I can't wait to try this.
  • teachers must learn to effectively incorporate these social media based initiatives into their lessons.
    • djarends
       
      A concern for me. I have grown greatly in my skills with technology, but it still takes me time to learn the skills and how to implement into my classroom on top of all the new initiatives that the district is adding to our plates. I'm diving in but concerned. 
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I agree! It seems as I master something new in the area of technology, something bigger and better takes its place. Hard to keep up with technology in the education world.
    • kbolinger
       
      It is hard to keep up, and it takes time to implement anything new into a classroom, even with students that are pretty techie. In my experience with younger students, most of them need a lot of instruction and guided practice before they feel comfortable working independently.
  • Not every student is ready for this responsibility, so teachers need to have strategies in place to guide and support these learners.
    • djarends
       
      This is true of all learning resources.We need to teach students how to use the tools we give them or allow them to find. Knowing this will allow me to prepare a lesson(s) on how to use PLEs. 
  • ...18 more annotations...
  • I’ll continue to collect feedback from students on how this learning tool is working for them and how they are using it for themselves as well as within their groups
    • djarends
       
      I like how the author collects feedback on the usefulness of the tool. I have done this many times. As I approach Symbaloo, I will remember to ask students for things that worked for them and concerns. 
    • bkoller86
       
      I would be interested in how many students use Symbaloo on future projects that doesn't require its use. 
  • I’ve been slow to use tools and develop skills for managing online resource, such as the use of vehicles like Symbaloo, Evernote, or Diigo
    • djarends
       
      That is me! I have used Evernotes with students and like it. I have loved using Diigo. I plan on teaching students how to use it. I'm excited to try Symbaloo. Next step, figure out how to implement.
  • The concept of PLE is not a way to replace classroom learning, but to enhance it.
    • anonymous
       
      As a higher level Spanish teacher, every year I am trying to incorporate a system or resources that can allow students to go to a deeper and higher level of their language learning. Some students want to go on to minor and become more fluent, while others just want the credit. I'm hoping that a PLE can reach those students to dig deeper to become more fluent and culturally aware!
  • It’s easy to use A learner can pull information that’s personally useful to him/her Learners can personalize tiles to make them easy to spot Learners can add to, and draw from, a community of webmixes Interactivity + personalization = fun Instructional uses for Symbaloo include using Symbaloo to help learners create: A personal learning environment (PLE) with personal knowledge management (PKM) tools An eportfolio A collection of resources related to a problem-based learning challenge
    • anonymous
       
      I have created quite a few symbaloos and knew it was a cool tool but never knew how to incorporate those into my classes for students to use - I'm super excited to know how to set this up so that they can access my webpage see what they need to do on a daily/weekly basis and then have resources right there to help them do what they need to do. Can't wait to try for fall:)! 
  • you can create tiles that link to challenges, quiz questions, polls, discussion forums, chat pages, and other types of content and media that will facilitate more student involvement and creativity. You can provide a tile linking to a web page describing a number  of exploratory activities a student will need to engage in, but make the path for accomplishing these activities (e.g., the numbers and types of tiles used) up to the student.
    • anonymous
       
      Love the idea of creating a path for students... could there be a digital checklist also? Teacher could guide students for all class Kahoot game or other challenges. Students can also add a presentation/doc tile to prove their learning - love that, also. Great for project based, research and problem solving activities.  
    • bkoller86
       
      I like the idea of the students having the resources to take responsibility of the learning, and they can review and learn at their own pace. It is like a one stop shop.
  • students had to subscribe to news feeds and blogs, discern the value of social bookmarks, and set up the aggregator to manage all the Internet resources.
    • anonymous
       
      I am very unfamiliar with how to use news feeds and blogs with students - this would be something I would need an inservice for and how it can be put into a language classroom...
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Me too! I would need training on how to implement in the classroom.
  • Many students in the first class that tried Symbaloo today commented that they liked the clean, visual interface of Symbaloo and the ease of adding content; they also liked that they could customize the “tiles” they were adding and that their webmixes loaded quickly.
    • anonymous
       
      I can see my students setting up their own symbaloo (I can have them add my webmix to their account!) based on their skills needed to practice or go beyond for Spanish (vocabulary, grammar, culture, then speaking, writing, listening acts, readings)
  • students could demonstrate their learning through their PLE by creating blogs, wikispaces, prezi presentations and photo collages as final projects; thereby diversifying instruction. Some instructors empower students to use their own mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones as a means to create PLEs.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      in some cases will students become more proficient than their instructors, especially in the case of technology?
  • The notion of a PLE for students, grounding them intentionally in an environment of information tools and productive applications, is a great way to seek, develop, and structure that balanced approach.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I am inspired by PLEs and what's happening with them in education. I worry about schools who are not 1:1 with technology and/or students who don't have personal devices of their own.
  • Teachers, she explains, are no longer the primary or even the best source of information available to students, and our work must increasingly attend to supporting students in developing their skills and motivations for becoming themselves networked and sophisticated online learners.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Teacher's are not experts in all areas. In PLEs they serve as facilitators. I love my ah-ha moments when I learn something new from a student.
    • kbolinger
       
      The teacher's role in student learning looks very different in a PLE, which might be hard for teachers to adjust to.
  • The employ of PLEs in the classroom can go horribly wrong if teachers fail to prepare students and set usage parameters.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Or if students do not have the skills to manage their PLEs.
    • kbolinger
       
      I imagine there would need to be some prior (and ongoing) instruction for students in regards to internet safety and online ethics. My 3rd graders, who are probably much less connected with social media sites than older students, have had issues keeping their focus on the task at hand. Having access to online tools is great, but it can also be very distracting for my students. It is just too tempting for them to visit YouTube or another "fun" website rather than focusing on the task at hand. This is definitely a management issue that I have faced in the past couple of years.
  • The Symbaloo interface looks a bit like a high-tech Scrabble board with movable “tiles” on it. These tiles give you access to Web pages or other webmixes.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Works great with elementary students. I have seen them in action creating webmixes.
  • The social media platform that supports PLEs creates a perfect space for peer collaboration and sharing information.
    • kkoller
       
      I like this concept of PLE because it allows students to take ownership of their learning. It allows them to go as in depth as they want, and students are able to collaborate on their learning. I see this type of environment being very successful in an upper elementary to high school level classrooms. I worry, however, about lower elementary. I feel as educators we should take those early years to teach the skills needed to prepare students for this type of learning environment. Also to make it clear that learning can happen without technology. Technology is great tool for students to use and a great motivator, but I worry about the hands on experience and building of knowledge through the outside world. 
  • ersonal learning environments are beneficial because they support learning anywhere and allow learners to connect the diverse environments of school, home and play
    • kkoller
       
      Could this open the window of opportunity for students to work with other students in another district on the same concept? Another district in their state, another state, or even country? 
  • The idea of having one site to log into daily and then a pre-constructed  dashboard of all the learning tools and spaces available to us seemed appealing to the 7th period students today.
    • kkoller
       
      I love this concept because it allows the teachers to give the students a starting point, but plenty of opportunity to organize it and add to it. Students could use this for projects to organize their findings. They wouldn't have to sit there and search through their history. I like the fact that students can access it from any computer. 
    • bkoller86
       
      I could definitely see students using this as a way to visually organize their sources them find on a project. 
  • While it’s easy to create webmixes, you also might want to explore the Symbaloo gallery to find webmixes the Symbaloo community has create
    • kkoller
       
      Symbaloo would be great for students. But how about teachers??? Couldn't we all use this to organize all those sites, blogs, etc. we use on a daily basis? Also couldn't we use this to connect to other teachers who are also trying to adapt their classrooms to this new way of learning? 
  • Students now have access to desktop computers, smartphones, tablets, smart TVs and game systems that connect them to free online tools that are always available
    • kbolinger
       
      It is important to remember that, while many schools are working in a 1:1 environment, there are still many other schools that have limited access to technology. I would imagine that personalized learning would be much less challenging when there is ample access to technology, as well as professional development for teachers.
  • PLEs place a large amount of responsibility on students and thus requires a high level of self-management and awareness.
    • bkoller86
       
      I wonder how you handle classes with a large range of student responsibility and awareness in regards of use of PLEs. I would think it would take a large amount of student training. 
joanmax

Simple free learning tools for students and teachers | Quizlet - 1 views

shared by joanmax on 15 May 15 - No Cached
  •  
    This site provides many opportunities to practice Spanish. These can be the teacher's work or you may use practices created by other teachers.m
Jennifer Riedemann

ollie_4: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 4 views

  • Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Has there ever been a time when teachers can't give feedback or adjust their own teaching because students refuse to do what was intended as an instructional task for learning? As an educator, I have some students who don't want to do anything, even when given a choice on how they might show their learning.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      Unfortunately, at least in my teaching experience, in content areas other than reading and writing, I have run into many teachers who believed in the Bell Curve still for classroom grading. Their numbers are dwindling, but they still exist along with teachers who believe, "I told them once. They should have it." I'm so glad your experiences make your question even possible. That is growth and improvement in instruction.
  • Learning goals and criteria for success should be clearly identified and communicated to students.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found that learning goals are broader in scope since we no longer memorize, skill and drill, and have the detailed oriented mechanisms of learning in place. Maybe I am missing the boat, but I want my students to be: great speakers who project their voice(yes, I do use a decibel reader) when they are public speaking. It's a great to incorporate the science of speaking. I do want them to be great writers, and I will say a well written rubric can enhance this. I am also after great thinking and problem solving. I have found that the middle level learner can seem to problem solve in some situations, yet they have become inept at problem solving on how to "get a pencil" when they don't come to class with one in their possession. Being able to get along with many within their peer group would be great. This seems to be an ongoing battle for some individuals who "want to work" by themselves. I have had my share of accountants in my classroom.... :)
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Are you saying accountants are loners? They have to be able to work with clients :) (I'm a business teacher and just couldn't let this slide :)
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Jodi, That was a narrow view, please forgive me. I stand corrected by you....Thank you for your correction. I will say, I have students who want to work by themselves....that is great for reflection, yet collaboration is a skills that we all need to develop.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Mary, You are definitely not missing the boat! All those goals are excellent and very necessary for students to obtain. Do not give up on your broader learning goals and keep letting your students know that this is what you want for them. You might need a poster in your room with your broader goals stated on it as a constant reference for you and your students, and then post on your board your daily learning goals for your students. You are such a wonderful teacher and your students learn so much from you! Keep up the good work!
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Mary, I can absolutely relate to your comment about students that want to work by themselves! Some TAG students are "past masters" of wanting to do things on their own - I live with one!! Learning to collaborate is often a very difficult task for them in middle or high school. In my own experience, this improves for these high achievers when they reach college and are able to work with others that have similar abilities.
  • Descriptive feedback should be about the particular qualities of student learning with discussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found it interesting how the "Boy's Town" model from a long time ago....always started with a positive statement of praise and supporting details; yet if negative feedback was needed, it would weave in concern statement that didn't use words like "but or however". For example: I can appreciate how your started your paragraph with energy and great discriptive words. As you work on your thesis, you may want to keep in mind.....or have you ever thought of....? Yes, constructive feedback is an "art form" when communicating to students who think they have excellence, yet fall short....I mean way short.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I have never heard of the "Boy's Town" model but I like how you wrote about giving concerns to a student without using "but" or "however'- I can see that making such a difference and being more influential and beneficial to students!
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Too often the feedback is merely "corrective" - a check mark or "ok".
  • ...43 more annotations...
  • Creating such a culture requires teachers to model
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      This is huge, yet it is necessary.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      True, and it's the key to first level of helping students begin to grow!
    • anonymous
       
      The atmosphere has shifted, and we now not only have 'permission' to do this, but are expected.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is an absolute necessity!!!!
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Teachers need to ask more questions.
  • substantial interest in formative assessment
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      While the language of formative and summative assessment is relatively new as well as the new emphasis on direct feedback, the fact of the matter is that writing teachers have done these things forever. We just didn't package it with a fancy name in order to make oodles of $$. Dang it! ; )
  • is to provide evidence that is used by teachers and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      As I explain to my students, "If you can do this perfectly already, I shouldn't be teaching it."
    • Brooke Maine
       
      Haha, I like that Lorilee! I might have to steal it. :)
  • Learning Progressions:
  • Learning Goals and Criteria for Success
  • Descriptive Feedback:
  • Self- and Peer-Assessment:
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This is another area where writing teachers have a distinct advantage and have been practicing these protocols for a long time.
  • Collaboration
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop--that's the entire premise of Nancy Atwelll's work.
  • process requires the teacher to share learning goals with students
    • anonymous
       
      It makes such perfect sense to be doing this, and I'm not sure how much it is actually done. Just like in our class here, we want to know what we are expected to pick up from this and appreciate having the opportunity to self-assess our learning in a format where we can get instant feedback to see if we understand.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Clair, To be honest, in my experience out in the schools as an AEA Literacy Consultant, it is being done very little. No matter how many times I include this in professional development trainings over things like effective instruction, iowa core, etc., there are truly only a handful of teachers that share their learning goals with the students. Many of them write the goals out in their lesson plans, but never get around to telling the people who really need the information.
  • and provide opportunities for students to monitor their ongoing progress.
  • learning progression teachers have the big picture of what students need to learn, as well as sufficient detail for planning instruction to meet short-term goals.
  • It should help the student answer three basic questions: Where am I going? Where am I now? How can I close the gap?
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I have done something pretty unique I think in my classroom. I (and several student volunteers) have spent a lot of time over the last couple years writing out each unit's learning objectives on posters that I laminate and hang on the wall in my classroom for every unit in every class. I made little, cute colored checkmarks that I also laminated and cut out. As we progress through the unit, I checkmark the learning objectives we have covered in class, so students can see very easily what we have done and what is left to cover. And above my posters, is another poster that says exactly what is written here: "Where amd I going? Where am I now? How can I close the gap?" I remember reading this quote during PD on FA, but now I know where it came from! :) It has taken a lot of time to make the posters and takes time to change them, put checkmarks on/off, etc, but I really like that it is a focal point in my room and is very unique. Students should know exactly what they are learning and use the questions above to self-assess as we go through our units.
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      That is a great idea! I am curious, have you found that your students are using the posters? Are they self-assessing? Are they taking ownership in their learning?
  • A teacher needs to have modeled good feedback with students and talked about what acceptable and unacceptable comments look like in order to have created a safe learning environment
    • anonymous
       
      Being able to give good constructive feedback is a skill that goes way beyond the classroom. It will serve students well later in life as they interact with co-workers, friends and eventually, their own children.
  • student- and peer-assessment should not be used in the formal grading process.
    • anonymous
       
      It's important to have students realize that they are not being graded on peer assessments.  It is only a benefit to give feedback about another person's assignment.  
  • teachers must provide the criteria by which learning will be assessed so that students will know whether they are successfully progressing toward the goal.
    • anonymous
       
      Students need to realize that they are progressing towards a goal.  If they don't see it, the quality of work usually isn't as great as when the goal is in mind.
  • self- and peer-assessment are important for providing students an opportunity to think meta-cognitively about their learning.
    • Mary Trent
       
      I think this needs to be used more often in the classroom. I know as teachers, we find collaborating with our peers to be so valuable and I think, if done correctly, students can also gain some very helpful insight into their learning.
  • supporting students as they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning, helping students to provide constructive feedback to each other, and involving students in decisions about how to move learning forward are illustrations of students and teachers working together in the teaching and learning process.
    • Mary Trent
       
      Amen! I think this statement is key. If students take ownership of their learning, they will become more passionate about it and ultimately want to do better for the pure knowledge and not just for a grade. Students need to feel as though they will have support through the learning process and will be able to rely on teachers and fellow students for help along their journey.
  • In peer-assessment, students analyze each others’ work using guidelines or rubrics and provide descriptive feedback that supports continued improvement.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      I've been trying this with lab groups in order to promote discussion both about experimental techniques as well as data analysis. After the initial work, I split groups up and have each partner discuss results with a member of another group.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I like that idea Jason! When we looked at rubrics at the beginning of this class and shared a rubric we use in our teaching, the project for the rubric I shared is something I always have students self-assess and peer-assess when the projects are complete. I then give the students a few days if they wish to make any changes before they turn the project in to me for a final grade. I have definitely seen an improvement in scores and cognitive thinking when I started the self- and peer-assessment.
  • This feeling is dependent on a classroom culture characterized by a sense of trust between and among students and their teachers; by norms of respect, transparency, and appreciation of differences; and by a non-threatening environment
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      All of these aspects are highlighed in the Characteristics of Effective Instruction in the Iowa Core.
  • during recent years
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I personally have learned a ton of information about FA the last several years. I took a class on it for my master's degree about 4 years ago or so and that next school year, it was the focus of PD in our district and is always something we revisit. I wish I would have learned more about it in college before I started teaching! But I'm glad to have the knowledge now.
  • Learning progressions describe how concepts and skills build in a domain, and show the trajectory of learning along which students are expected to progress.
    • Mike Todd
       
      I  know that in science, organizations like AAAS have worked hard to develop these progressions for many topics and created resources (Benchmarks, ATLAS, etc.).  But for some topics these need to be developed by the teacher.  And even with the AAAS resources, developing these learning progressions into a course that helps students connect everything together is the job of the teacher.  Collaborating on these tasks with other teachers is extremely worthwhile - I just wish this was valued by more school districts and administrators by allowing more time for these things during the school day.  Many seem to think that "courses" are already planned out.  I even had one superintendent that told me "Any minute not spent with students is a waste of time for teachers" - she was obviously lacking in knowledge about what professional teachers do with their time.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Good grief! I'm glad the state government is now stepping in to require schools to allow teacher collaboration. The only problem is the state's requirements are vastly lower than what should be and needs to be provided to teachers so that real collaboration on student progress and course development can happen.
  • The opening paragraph does not capture the audience’s attention because it does not clearly state what the speech is about. However, the opening sentence of the second paragraph states your position with an effective contrast. What can you do to improve or strengthen your opening paragraph?
    • Mike Todd
       
      I have often focussed on putting feedback on writing, similar to the last question, but have failed to include the preceding sentence - I agree that both are important.
  • Effective formative assessment involves collecting evidence about how student learning is progressing during the course of instruction so that necessary instructional adjustments can be made to close the gap between students’ current understanding and the desired goals.
    • Pam Rust
       
      This says it all. How many times do teachers check for understanding along the way and then just keep rolling through the lesson, ignoring the fact that some kids are missing something. Does no good to check for understanding as you go if you do nothing when the data says not everyone gets it yet.
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Why do so many teachers assign a grade to formative assessments when, according to this, it is to collect evidence on how student learning is progressing towards the desired goal?
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I have no idea Jodi, but I support a number of schools that firmly believe if they do not give something a grade then there is no use in doing it with the students. This statement is so perfect as to the purpose of formative assessment yet I would say the majority of teachers in the schools I come in contact with give a quiz, complain that the kids don't get it - as though it's all the kid's fault, and move right on with the content. It's frustrating!!
    • Dan Jones
       
      On the student side of Jodi's argument, many students do not see the importance of something if they are not getting a grade. Just yesterday, a couple of my students were complaining about something they had to do and they, "weren't even getting a grade on it so why bother". I agree with the statement that we need to see where they are, a lot of teachers just keep plowing through even though the infromation they get back indicates that a lot of students aren't getting it. It isn't helping the kid's perspective if they fail quizzes along the way and then fail a test.
  • Because the formative assessment process helps students achieve intended learning outcomes based on explicit learning progressions, teachers must first identify and then communicate the instructional goal to students.
    • Pam Rust
       
      Over the past few years we have worked on this during our PD. Goals are written on our boards and we refer to them often.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Excellent! I am so glad to hear that at least one school is following through on this!
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Love all the acronyms in the opening three paragraphs :)
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Education is truly becoming an "alphabet soup"!
  • a process rather than a particular kind of assessment
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      I know a few teachers that automatically equate formative assessment with quiz or test.
  • language readily understood by students
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      "I can" statements
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Yes! It's a waste of time if students do not understand the learning goal!
  • ormative assessment
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      It seems that there has been all this buzz about formative assessment like it is a new thing. For ever teachers have been using formative assessment to guide instruction on a daily basis. I appreciate that is has gotten attention so that teachers can collaborate to build assessments together and analyze data.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Holly, I am an AEA Literacy Consultant and you have no idea the number of times over the past 6 -8 years that I have found teachers who have absolutely no idea what the difference is between formative and summative assessments or how to conduct them in the classroom. In fact, the majority of teachers, even after training, want to be able to attach a grade to all formative assessment. They do not understand that this type of assessment can be accomplished in ways that do not involve a piece of paper, a homework assignment, or a pop quiz. It is truly an ongoing battle in a number of schools.
  • Formative assessment is not an adjunct to teaching but, rather, integrated into instruction and learning with teachers and students receiving frequent feedback.
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      Helping educators integrate the formative assessment process is key to helping them be successful. They can't see it as one more thing to do.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I agree completely, if only I could get teachers to understand this fact! They see it as "one more thing I "gotta" do" rather than a way to see if their students are really understanding the material.
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Feedback to the student in terms of what they need to do differently is the most frequently ignored part of the process.
  • evidence-based feedback
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      The Iowa Core aides the process of giving feedback as it provides specific student targets.
  • timely feedback should be based on the learning goal and criteria for success.
  • the reason the steps were incorrect.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is not a process that happens quickly. It takes lots and lots of good modeling by the instructor to create an environment safe enough for students to feel comfortable receiving as well as accepting good feedback.
  • students and their peers are involved there are many more opportunities to share and receive feedback
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      This type of feedback is especially useful in improving project-based or performance tasks.
  • may be accompanied by realistic examples of those that meet and do not meet the criteria
    • kellie kendrick
       
      I used to be hesitant about showing my students examples because I didn't want to limit their creativity. Once I started showing them, however, I saw that more students understood how to demonstrate their knowledge of the goals set out, and the end products were much more high quality. I first only did this with big projects, but have slowly begun showing students more high and low quality examples for smaller projects too.
  • In addition, students can be encouraged to be self-reflective by thinking about their own work based on what they learned from giving feedback to others
    • kellie kendrick
       
      Self and peer reflection is something that I still struggle with. I have my students in Spanish III and IV often perform peer reflections with the writings that they do, but they still do not always take it seriously. I have tried to tell them that they should work hard to improve someone else's paper because they want their peers to help improve their own papers. As for self reflection, I am still working with my students to see the value in their own thinking.
  • Sharing learning goals and criteria for success with student
  • Instead, there are a number of formative assessment strategies that can be implemented during classroom instruction.
    • Dan Jones
       
      This is where teachers get to use their covert,'sneaky' skills. They have to figure out how to get the information necessary to assess where the students are while appearing to go about their usual daily business. You have to be able to track that info too, which can be hard if you are collecting data on the sly.
  • students must be actively involved
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      This can be a big challenge for teachers when parents are not involved in their students' learning and/or students do not put forth the effort. Sadly, this is very common.
  • “just right gap”
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      The problem here is that the students in one class are not all at the same growth point and with growing class sizes, it can be difficult for the teachers to adjust to all students at the same time. Usually the advanced students will push themselves, but what about the lower students that need more time? With so much required of the teachers, they feel the pressure to move on so they can cover all of their units even when some students have not achieved the short term goals. This can lead to even bigger problems down the road.
  • allow the student an opportunity to identify ways to move learning forward
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      So important to allow the student to identify the ways to move forward instead of just telling them what to do. This is where true learning takes place.
  • FAST SCASS and FA Advisory Group
parsonsbrandi

ollie_4_1: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 0 views

  • In the past, few educators, policymakers, or parents would have considered questioning the accuracy of these tests
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      I wonder if the pendulum has swung too far in the other direction, where now everyone is questioning everything.
  • We're betting that the instructional hours sacrificed to testing will return dividends in the form of better instructional decisions and improved high-stakes test scores.
  • The assessor must begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment
  • ...17 more annotations...
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Begin with the end in mind.
  • If we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Making this understandable to students is key. I ventured out and taught my own children a series of swim lessons (I usually teach other people's kids) and when I talked to my daughter about being able to go off the diving board this summer, she stayed more focused on improving.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      A clear learning target contributes to better measurement and incentive for improvement.
  • cultural insensitivity
  • Are results communicated in time to inform the intended decisions?
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      We've come a long ways technologically speaking in the ability to use real-time data to instruct students since the publication date of this article, but unfortunately a lot of the decisions (as far as policy goes) are to still completed on an annual basis.
    • Barbara Day
       
      I agree. A perfect example of that is with Iowa Assessments. In my school district, teachers usually don't see the results until the end of the school year when those students will no longer be in their class.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      Technology tools within LMS platforms can allow for better "real-time" feedback from assessments
  • Teachers should design the assessment so students can use the results to self-assess and set goals
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      We're working on self-assessing and setting goals for our adult learners, which is leading to a higher persistence rate in continuing in the program. 
  • Inherent in its design is the need for all assessors and users of assessment results to be assessment literate—to know what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate uses of assessment results—thereby reducing the risk of applying data to decisions for which they aren't suited.
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      It is so important for all stakeholders to be assessment literate - and far too often, that doesn't happen.
  • Using misinformation to triangulate on student needs defeats the purpose of bringing in more results to inform our decisions.
    • Barbara Day
       
      I think sometimes that misinformation takes the form of not understanding how the student is thinking, or misunderstanding the skill.
  • Creating a plan like this for each assessment helps assessors sync what they taught with what they're assessing. It also helps them assign the appropriate balance of points in relation to the importance of each target as well as the number of items for each assessed target.
    • Barbara Day
       
      You have to be sure you are testing what you think you are testing.  So identifying the learning target for each question is key.
    • erichillman
       
      Agreed- while it may be easy to say having clear learning targets is just "more on my plate", my answer is that it is "stacking the plates" so they are easier to carry!
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      I like that analogy - "stacking the plates."
  • Sound Assessment DesignThis key ensures that the assessor has translated the learning targets into assessments that will yield accurate results. It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • Bias can also creep into assessments and erode accurate results. Examples of bias include poorly printed test forms, noise distractions, vague directions, and
  • keep wording simple and focused, aim for the lowest possible reading level, avoid providing clues or making the correct answer obvious, and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
    • Barbara Day
       
      This is a pet peeve of mine. We need to be clear and direct in defining our learning goals. We need to ask questions using vocabulary that is appropriate to the age and skill of the students.
  • Student Involvement in the Assessment ProcessStudents learn best when they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning. This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • we might put the learning target in student-friendly language: "I can make good inferences. This means I can use information from what I read to draw a reasonable conclusion." If we were working with 2nd graders, the student-friendly language might look like this: "I can make good inferences. This means I can make a guess that is based on clues."
    • Barbara Day
       
      If we don't put the target in student friendly language it is meaningless.  
  • Selecting an assessment method that is incapable of reflecting the intended learning will compromise the accuracy of the results.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      match the assessment method to reflect intended learning 
    • erichillman
       
      So important in science with the move to NGSS. You just can't assess a performance task with a multiple choice test (unless the performace task is taking multiple choice tests, of course)
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Really, in all the NGLM, you need to be able to assess performance tasks. I hated that there was less focus on actually speaking a world language when I taught Spanish than on the assessments of vocabulary. If I were to go back in the classroom, my classes would look a lot different now.
  • This is done using both formative and summative assessments, large-group and individual testing, assessing a range of relevant learning targets using a range of appropriate assessment methods.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      multiple types of assessments AND both formative and summative
  • The assessor must begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment
    • erichillman
       
      A question we forget to ask all too often.  Why am I testing? To put a grade in the grade book?  To see if they "know" it?  What happens if they don't? (besides just moving on)...
    • erichillman
       
      This is such an important foundational piece. When we haven't done backwards design we often have misalignment between the assessment and what we are assessing
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      So true! - When I teach swimming I always think with the end in mind, but so many times we forget to do that when we're doing things like creating a rubric.
bkoller86

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 2 views

  • Educators at the EduCon conference hosted by Science Leadership Academy eagerly discussed the merits and challenges of personalizing learning. Dozens of teachers agreed that a truly personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich. This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model. Technology was strikingly absent from these conversations. Instead, the common view of personalization focused on giving agency for learning to the student and valuing each individual in a classroom.
    • anonymous
       
      So do the students get the necessary skills first from the teacher then are able to choose what they want to learn about? How would a teacher then keep track of how they are learning?
    • djarends
       
      I wonder that. Would they use the portfolio method? I also wonder about the choice issue. How is this being accomplished? Are they given the assignment / task and have choice within the project or do they have complete choice over what they learn? 
    • kbolinger
       
      I was wondering some of these same things too. How do students get the necessary prerequisite skills needed to complete their chosen task...the teacher? a computer? If you have 25 students and they all want/need to learn about a concept in different way or they choose different projects at multiple levels of learning, how does one teacher possibly manage that? Are young students able to have as much choice as older students or does that increase as students grow and understand more about themselves as a learner?
  • However, in order to navigate the system of accountability in the U.S. educational system, many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms.
    • anonymous
       
      I would think there would be math and science teachers asking about how personalized learning would help students improve standardized test scores for those areas. Should the specific curriculum in the U.S. educational system be tweaked to allow more personalized learning? 
    • bkoller86
       
      I think there is a balance between personalized learning and standardized learning. I would like the end goal would be the same for everyone, but the road to get there would be personalized. 
  • Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
    • anonymous
       
      I love this idea! As a Spanish teacher, I want to give them the skills for communication but then let them explore and learn what they want to learn how they want to learn - can't wait to explore that option!
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I agree! Students need to have the skills first then explore what and how they want to learn.
    • kkoller
       
      I like this idea because it teaches students to take ownership of their learning. It might also motivate those kids who constantly encounter on a daily basis that hate school. I wonder though from an elementary perspective, how do we change how we do things to better prepare our students for this kind of education?
    • bkoller86
       
      Whenever students and apply the skills to a passion of theirs students are able to see the purpose of courses they have taken. Students who struggle in math and science learn many of those skills in my agriculture class because they are engaged in a passion of theirs. 
  • ...25 more annotations...
  • From what I’ve seen, flipping doesn’t do much for helping kids become better learners in the sense of being able to drive their own edu
  • the best thing we can do for kids is empower them to make regular, important, thoughtful decisions about their own learning, what they learn and how they learn it, and to frame our use of language in that larger shift, not simply in the affordances for traditional curriculum delivery that the tools of the moment might bring.
    • anonymous
       
      Teachers need to think about goals & practices but students should also be thinking about their goals and how they learn and process information in the classroom! 
    • djarends
       
      Agree! 
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I agree, but the skills to do so need to be there first.
  • Personalized’ learning is something that we do to kids; ‘personal’ learning is something they do for themselves.”[4]
    • anonymous
       
      This is the second reference I've seen for this quote - should we then be gearing students towards a more "personal" learning concept?  
    • kbolinger
       
      I was thinking the same thing. It looks like the actual definition of Personalized Learning is widely debated. It would be nice if there was one term that, when spoken by educators, we would all be on the same page as to what it refers to. Either way, and no matter what it is called, the outcome that we are looking for should be the same - learner-centered schools that give students complete voice and choice.
  • A personalized environment gives students the freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize and analyze information into original productions.
    • djarends
       
      I like how this is worded. Students have freedom and choice. The task / learning is meaningful. Many high school students become frustrated because they do not see a reason for doing something. They learn skills that goes beyond just memorizing materials. They have to synthesize and analyze the information. Well worded.
  • lend themselves well to the computerized, modular and often very standardized system of “personalization” many ed-tech companies are offering.
    • djarends
       
      I become frustrated when I hear about this programs or are being pushed by administrators. I know they work for some students, but even those students need some guidance. I feel learning is more than just reading and completing material on the computer. It is interacting with people. The business world wants students that graduate with people skills (communication, cooperation, collaboration, etc.). Will this happen in a ed-tech "personalization" program only? 
  • It’s a dramatic shift that requires new literacies to navigate all that access and, importantly, new dispositions to take advantage of it for learning.
    • djarends
       
      "Ah, ha": As a person who has been teaching for a while and one who did not even know what a computer was until having to take a course at college for education, this rang true for me. It is a literacies that has to be learned by the older generation. My students are so immersed in this technology literacy. They navigate the web very quickly. They do not usually have the fear of the web which needs to be taught. Most of my students just laugh at me when I ask for help but do it willingly and are great teachers. I have learned a lot from them and appreciate their technology literacy skills.
  • “personal” learning is something they do for themselves
    • djarends
       
      I had not considered the differences before. I like that the students do it for themselves. I think they are more willing to learn when they have a purpose and the learning is much deeper. 
  • But if the point is to help kids understand ideas from the inside out and answer their own questions about the world, then what they’re doing is already personal (and varied).
    • djarends
       
      Facts are nothing without the understanding. What do the students THINK about their learning. The five Ws. Students become frustrated at me when I ask my favorite questions "How" or "Why" do you think that. It is hard to express our thinking. It is easy to spit out facts. 
  • because of the larger preoccupation with data data data data data.
    • djarends
       
      IEPs!
  • in the best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another. Thus, while making sense of ideas is surely personal, it is not exclusively individual because it involves collaboration and takes place in a community.
    • djarends
       
      I am glad this was added. I worry about not having students that can work well with other. 
  • Dozens of teachers agreed that a truly personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich. This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      When discussing the merits and challenges of personalized learning, it's alarming to me that technology was absent from the converstations when most of what I read includes the use of technology.
  • many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms. When that happens, the structures around the classroom leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I like that conversations are getting serious about personalized learning, but how do we get school districts on board when training, planning, technology, etc., are driven by time and funding?
  • In a world where we can explore almost every interest or passion in depth on our own or with others, it’s crucially more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Comes down to training. Not all students have the skills to create their own personal learning.
    • albertscarr
       
      I remember in 4th grade when my teacher got mad at me when I couldn't finish my math paper "on time." It would have been so much easier to go at my own pace!
  • She cautions educators who may be excited about the progressive educational implications for “personalized learning” to make sure everyone they work with is on the same page about what that phrase means.
    • albertscarr
       
      In reading these articles there does seem to be a lot of individual definitions of "personalization." However on the flip side it is personalized, so everyone is going to have their own definition.
  • Personalization promises better student achievement and, I believe, a more effective delivery method than any one teacher with 25 or 30 students in a classroom can compete with. It’s a no-brainer, right?
    • albertscarr
       
      With a class that size its hard to see any growth of any student with traditional methods. Personalization would help the teacher keep tack of each child's progress
  • The main objective is just to raise test scores
    • albertscarr
       
      Then we need to rethink the way we test!
    • bkoller86
       
      I agree test scores carry to much weight, but they aren't going away anytime soon. To many people in powerful places want to know where their money is going. 
  • it is clear that all children don’t learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences
    • kbolinger
       
      I agree. Personalization seems to be an almost perfect answer to addressing all of the different needs, learning styles, and achievement levels in our classrooms today. I wonder if this approach will become the norm for schools, and, if so, how long will it take for schools to completely adopt this model.
    • bkoller86
       
      I also agree. In a time we look at test score more and more it is increasingly more important to move every student forward. Not all children learn the same way; we can't expect them to show growth if we don't personalize the learning.
  • Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace
    • kbolinger
       
      I feel much more knowledgeable about Personalized Learning today than I did a week ago. If someone would have asked me then if an adaptive learning or a computerized program that is tailored to a student's level and progresses them at their own pace is personalized learning, I surely would have said, "Yes!" I have now come to realize that there are many Personalized Learning components that are missing with just an adaptive learning program. Where is the student choice or goal setting? What if a computer is not that student's preferred learning method?
  • The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises
    • kkoller
       
      Teachers often use websites that will modify lessons to the student to push them ahead of their peers. I am just as guilty of this because I will often have students who are high in math, and have no one to put them with, so I use a website to help them progress. They make progress because it is personalized to them, but it doesn't tap into their interest and learning style. 
  • For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.” “That has nothing to do with the person sitting in front of you,” Laufenberg said. “It meets the needs of an individual in a very standardized way, but it doesn’t take into account who that kid is.
    • kkoller
       
      I feel teachers turn to technology because that is the quick fix to getting student learning to be ore personalized. We struggle to get enough staff, and numbers keep increasing in classrooms. How are teachers suppose to be creative and innovative when they can't get help in the room? 
  • Our kids (and we ourselves) are suddenly walking around with access to the sum of human knowledge in our pockets and connections to literally millions of potential teachers.
    • kkoller
       
      It is a great thing that we have such incredible access to information and others in our profession. It allows us to make connections, and reach out in education to see how other districts are getting it done. However, we as educators need to teach our students that while the access is wonderful, we need be careful of what we read. Students need to be taught the literacies of technology, and how to be critical of information found. 
  • others
  • opportunities
bkoller86

Implementation in a Secondary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

  • When you give students choice, it opens up a lot of avenues. When they are given the option to decide what they’re going to do, whatever the product is, it’s theirs—giving them ownership and responsibility for their own learning.”
    • anonymous
       
      I agree and I have found this to be true, but most students will try to find the easiest choice with the least amount of work - will teachers need to have 10 different rubrics for 10 different project choices? There should be some guidelines/parameters for teachers for keeping organized & sane:)!  
  • This flipped learning setup frees up my students to use classtime to practice their skills. For instance, they might annotate a short story or poem in Google Docs or take part in a Socratic seminar. During our unit on research into social justice issues, students receive a digital review of the research process and choose their learning activities based on their needs. Some may meet with me to review how to embed quotes while other groups start planning their presentations and still others work idependently on gathering valid research.
    • anonymous
       
      The online presentations lessons definitely need to have something tied to it to make students have to use it - if they know that it will be retaught/played in class, they won't watch it but if they know they have a task tied with the video, will they be more apt to watch it? A fellow teacher found that out that it can't be just what you would say/do in the classroom...:)
  • And our classroom is often noisy and active as we play a round of Kahoot, which gives me instant, actionable feedback on what we need to do next, who needs to be pulled into a small group for reteaching and who would be better off in a group that pursues extended learning while I reteach the rest of the class. I also gather formative assessment data through: Discussion threads. Self-grading quizzes, which give students immediate and actionable feedback on their proficiency in specfic skills. Monitoring of their works in progress on Google Docs. Exit tickets, which assess the class’ comfort level with new concepts
    • anonymous
       
      Love these ideas about assessing mostly formatively for teachers & students love Kahoot!  
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  • My next goal is to let them “test out” of some activities when they show content mastery.
    • anonymous
       
      Would they get credit/points for that content mastery? and how would that transfer with grading? Good points for setup and things to consider...
  • access
  • Now they have access to the full unit from the beginning, so they can gauge their own pacing and get practice in time management. Completion rules also give me the freedom to have small-group or individual conferences to assess learning and make choices about future instruction.
    • anonymous
       
      For my Spanish classes, this would be an exciting concept for those students that learn the language faster and can work ahead or enhance their communication to a higher level - they would not be "stuck" in a concept they've already mastered & would be able to get to more complicated grammar/sentence structures, become more fluent.
  • rofessional development must be stitched into the work routine of teachers, not tacked onto the work day or week” (p. 1)
    • anonymous
       
      There are so many new initiatives being implemented and talked about - in my district/curriculum area they spend so much time talking - when can teachers start getting the time to develop and try out their ideas and not talk it to death?
  • It is a messier way to teach, though it takes more organization on the teacher’s part, not less. You really have to be on top of things to allow the students choice since now there is more than one “right” way of doing something in the classroom. And Julie Ison (the team’s mathematics teacher) adds, “You have to have a principal who understands that when he walks into a room and it’s not silent, it’s okay.
    • bkoller86
       
      I can very much see that this would be a far less traditional approach to teaching. For principals that have a very traditional view of education, it could make it difficult for teachers to try. 
  • “Giving choice is about empowering students. It makes them feel that they are part of the process, not powerless; that’s the kind of feeling that motivates everyone.”
    • bkoller86
       
      People (students are people also) always work harder and dig deeper when they are on the inside not on the outside being told what to do. 
  • Across the board, my students acknowledge that they feel better prepared for college or jobs because of our use of collaborative technology. I feel that I am on this blended learning journey with them, and I truly believe it has made us all more engaged in our work and more focused learners.
    • bkoller86
       
      The goal should really be to prepare students for a future career like the author stated. That is the type of environment they will be working in.
  • When you want to give students choice, it is often optimal to give them a limited number of options, but be as flexible as possible
    • bkoller86
       
      I think this would be one of the more difficult things to do. I would want to give choices and freedom but I wouldn't want it to be completely wide open. 
Peggy Steinbronn

ollie4_1: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 1 views

  • Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      I can get on board with this definition!
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Yes, I agree. I cannot imagine how many hours went into this one short sentence. :)
    • Aaron Evans
       
      Agreed. We had to do this for an Iowa Core training and it was a lot harder than it looked.
  • Learning Goals and Criteria for Success: Learning goals and criteria for success should be clearly identified and communicated to students.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      I think this is an area that has gotten a lot of attention in the last five years, and teachers have become more efficient at this.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      We have been working on this as well. I hope students see why we are doing it. I remember asking a geometry teacher when will I ever use this or why are we doing it. He never did answer me, and I was already confused by the subject. It may have helped me to know why we were doing it.
    • kangas
       
      I try to give my students a unit plan/overview at the start of the unit, that lists my goals, the activities we are going to do and a tentative schedule. As we get to projects/assessments, we've already practiced skills and work on fine tuning the rubric together. I hope they are able to see how things fit together but, I am not always sure they get why they need to retain the knowledge for future use. Foreign Language requires you to use prior knowledge of Spanish and English Grammar. This year we will add the references to the national foreign language standards and competency based grading to the mix. Should be interesting action research.
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      Yes, teachers need to be very clear about learning goals and success criteria. A part of our Gradual Release classroom walk throughs including interviewing students to see if they can state in their own words what they are learning.
  • Descriptive Feedback: Students should be provided with evidence-based feedback that is linked to the intended instructional outcomes and criteria for success.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      Specific and evidence-based feedback is most effective for everyone involved.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      It is the biggest bang for the buck to improve learning compared to any other strategy. This does need to be our focus.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I agree that this should be our focus. Unfortunately this is more time consuming so for many teachers this can get put on the back burner.
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  • The primary purpose of the formative assessment process, as conceived in this definition, is to provide evidence that is used by teachers and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process.
    • anonymous
       
      This makes such perfect sense and sounds like it would be so easy.
    • kangas
       
      Using google forms and the flubaroo script (add-in) makes quick feedback an easy part of my class. 10 quick questions on the iPad and feedback almost immediately. I wait until everyone is done then send it to them. Then we can look at it again as a whole group.
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      It seems important to me that the evidence is for both students AND teachers.
    • Peggy Steinbronn
       
      Thanks for sharing about the Google add-in, flubaroo. It seems like it provides quick, easy feedback that would be useful to students.
  • The students must be actively involved in the systematic process intended to improve their learning. The process requires the teacher to share learning goals with students and provide opportunities for students to monitor their ongoing progress.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I think too often we do not involve the students in even formative assessment. A test, quiz or any other assessment is usually seen by the student as something that is done to them. The teacher gives it to them, grades it and show the grade, rather than it being more of a cooperative project involving both student and teacher with the clear goal of finding out what is being learned in order to improve future learning opportunitites.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      This goes back to the argument of how and why we grade. Why do students expect a grade for everything they do? Because we, as teachers and society, have taught them that the grade is important. Lost in that approach was the idea that the learning is the important aspect of school.
    • kangas
       
      I had students tell me that they don't try as hard if it is not graded. So I tell them everything is graded (some is completion, some is accuracy. If it's going to be like the real world/a job, all the things you do are looked at in your performance review, not just one assignment/project. It shows me a lot about work ethic and accountability for my own learning if they don't take the activities seriously. Some are meant to be fun, but they are also educational and chosen for a purpose.
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      Good point comparing quality school work to job performance. In the world of work, each day contributes to a person's performance evaluation.
    • anonymous
       
      This seems to be a part that is skipped sometimes. Teacher are actively involved in formative assessments, but are kids always involved? Do the kids know when they need further instruction or reteaching?
  • Helping students think meta-cognitively about their own learning fosters the idea that learning is their responsibility and that they can take an active role in planning, monitoring, and evaluating their own progress.
    • anonymous
       
      This sometimes seems like the hardest part to me - getting kids to realize that they are responsible for their own learning. Sometimes students want to take a more passive role and it becomes quite a challenge to engage and motivate them to become active participants.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      Agree! Especially second semester of senior year!
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I do not feel that education has done a great job of making learning relevant to THEIR lives. I am hopeful the Core will push us to give projects, assessments, etc. where the kids see their connection (relevant now- not when they are 25) to the world & learning- not just something a teacher assigns.
    • A Hughes
       
      I went to the AEA 11 TIC/TOC presentation on Project Based learning. It was eye opening to see teachers really challenging their students with a project. I do know some students that just want the easy grade of an objective test instead of projects.
  • Descriptive feedback should be about the particular qualities of student learning with discussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve. It should avoid comparisons with other pupils
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This is a big statement. It requires a solid rubric, checklist, or whatever the assessment may be in order to have students see exactly what they did and keep us from comparing it to other students.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      I think that with the grade removed, the ease (and temptation) to compare students to each other is reduced. Summative assessments for a grade almost mandates comparisons since you have to rank students, either to each other or to a pre-existing scale. Providing feedback for each individual to do better doesn't have this built in competitive dimension.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I did this in the writing process. It was difficult for students but powerful. I know now that I needed to model what suggestions for improvements & positives looked like besides, "spell better" or "it was good."
  • there is clearly no one best way to carry out formative assessment.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      And this is what making teaching so difficult yet makes it so awesome at the same time.
    • keri bass
       
      I think this also supports the idea that you need to vary the assessment as well to make sure that an accurate picture of the the students' learning is assessed.
  • In peer-assessment, students analyze each others’ work using guidelines or rubrics and provide descriptive feedback that supports continued improvement.
    • A Hughes
       
      How does the teacher get the students to give positive descriptive feedback? I would be concerned that students would just give their friends the "ok you did great" kind of feedback.
    • kangas
       
      I think that this is particularly challenging in foreign language, where students are still acquiring skills of writing. To do this effectively, I think you need to scaffold it, and then have the student look at his/her work with a definitive list of criteria and then have a peer look at it with the same list and ultimately have them compare it. I am not sure how to account for kids who don't have the skills to do the task....
  • Formative assessment is not an adjunct to teaching but, rather, integrated into instruction and learning with teachers and students receiving frequent feedback.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      This is the important part for teachers to understand. We often think, or hear other complain, about every new idea being somethign new added to their workload. This is actually a purposeful planning of many concepts that you already employ, just being used for a more structured and planned purpose.
  • Collaboration: A classroom culture in which teachers and students are partners in le
    • A Hughes
       
      Collaboration between the teacher and students takes time to establish. As a librarian, this is extremely difficult for me to do. I drop in and collaborate with the classroom teacher for a short lesson.
  • teachers must provide the criteria by which learning will be assessed so that students will know whether they are successfully progressing toward the goal
    • jquandahl
       
      This is such an important point. Teachers and students need to be "on the same page" - understanding where they they are going, why, and how they will get there.
  • A teacher needs to have modeled good feedback with students and talked about what acceptable and unacceptable comments look like in order to have created a safe learning environment.
    • jquandahl
       
      Another important thing to remember. Sometimes, as teachers, we can lose sight of how important it is to MODEL MODEL MODEL in order for students to truly understand and be successful.
  • formative assessment be regarded as a process rather than a particular kind of assessment.
    • keri bass
       
      I like that it repeats the importance of the process here. I noticed that in the official definition it does not mention a means of ranking students, but rather a process intended to improve student achievement. I think too much emphasis gets place on the grade by both students and the teacher and not enough emphasis on the learning.
    • Peggy Steinbronn
       
      I agree with your comment about emphasis on the grade--parents seem to be in the same "boat". How can we get that turned around?
  • A further benefit of providing feedback to a peer is that it can help deepen the student’s own learning. However, student- and peer-assessment should not be used in the formal grading process.
    • keri bass
       
      While I believe that teaching the subject encourages deeper understanding, the counselor me is more cautious about the potential harm in pairing the wrong students. I think it would be imperative to choose the right partners to insure optimal learning.
  • feedback
  • However, for students to be actively and successfully involved in their own learning, they must feel that they are bona fide partners in the learning process. This feeling is dependent on a classroom culture characterized by a sense of trust between and among students and their teachers; by norms of respect, transparency, and appreciation of differences; and by a non-threatening environment.
Annalisa Miner

Make Belief Comix - 0 views

  •  
    create comics in Spanish, French, German, Italian, English, Portuguese, Latin.
Jennifer Riedemann

Article(s): Self- and Peer-Assessment Online - 0 views

  • Assessing Learning
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Assessing Learning
  • I wonder if the concept of peer evaluation is exclusive to higher education institutions in the USA
  • encourages the student to consider actions that he or she demonstrated to support the team
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      Self assessment can lead to higher learning and increased performance as the student's refer to the assignment criteria on the rubric.
  • ...38 more annotations...
  • learning occurs in, and is mediated by, social interaction
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      This seems to be a more realistic way to learn since this is how the majority of workplaces function.
  • quality of comments