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eglemarija

Gaming could be the ultimate tool to re-engage boys in education - 4 views

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    This TEDtalk might not answer directly to open knowledge topics so far, however it speaks to some of the issues raised in this week's lectures: pop-culture and technology can and should be used to engage people into educational & social activities (especially evident in Dr Jenkins' talk). Here, Ali Carr-Chellman talks about issues boys face in school - basically, they just don't belong there, as teaching is usually brought about from a woman's point of view (most teachers are female) and boys are told to be girls. Eventually, they feel they just won't succeed and take up other things - e.g. video games. The speaker advocates that video games could and should be used as a valuable tool to reach boys. Providing more resources, games could become THE ultimate way to deliver important messages and to teach effectively. (This also speaks to the point in Clarke's lecture, that games can be made into powerful scientific and educational plarforms.)
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    This has certainly been the case with my 15 year-old, who through Minecraft has created extensive networks for exchanging ideas and interests that have turned into research projects for his debate class.
eglemarija

Extremely inspiring (and "crazy" in a good way!) talk about using video games to change... - 9 views

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    Dr Jane McGonigal (a professional game developer) talks about the time spent playing video games (which approximates to the span of human evolution), and that this time has to increase to make any major changes to the world. I have selected this resource partially in relation to week 3's Clarke's lecture (and others), which talks about using our idle time to do something meaningful - participate in citizen science games, for example. Dr McGonigal's talk very much illustrates this point - except that it talks about solving global issues through indirect games, e.g. a World Without Oil online game simulates a world in which you have to survive oil shortage. Creator's research shows, that people maintain the skills and habits they have taken up after playing this intense game, which include making better choices for our changing environment. The only difference here from actual citizen science games is that Dr McGonigal's games are fictional (rather than providing direct data / input for actual scientific research), however, they empower people to influence global change, which is the topic of the other lectures this week, especially Morozov's thoughts about the power of internet and connectiveness to create "revolutions". Although Morozov has taken up a rather critical view, suggesting only those who want it, take the best from the Internet, Dr McGonigal's ideas might be what bridges the two - taking games, which are integral part of many people's lives, especially in the younger generation, and turning them into real "life schools" may help more people get the idea and the essential skills to "fix" their environments. In all honesty, this is a video I would watch again and again, and recommend it to anyone who would listen (and that doesn't happen often for me).
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    Very interesting view about gaming in a digital world and gaming in a real world. How to balance both world is the challenge that we are all facing. One can see the advantage of computer gaming but also the disconnect with nature that over gaming can create.
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    A very interesting perspective. I took a course of Organisational Analysis offered in Coursera by Stanford University and, in the modules of "Learning Organisations" and "Organizational Culture" we reviewed this issue. Gamers usually develop different skills by playing online games as World of Warcraft, such as: communication, decision making, collaborative work, frustration tolerance and goals setting. This is because they practice, in an alternative world, many different real life situations. In addition, in clinical psychology are using virtual games to treat pacients and educate chilldrens. So, for that reasons, i think it is something really possible.
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    A thought-provoking viewpoint of gaming related to reality.Gamers can become empowered in the real world through skills learnt through gaming. Gaming is changing the look of education. 'Latest games are finally unlocking the key to making learning more fun' by Emmanuel Felton. http://hechingerreport.org/content/latest-games-finally-unlocking-key-making-learning-fun_17380/
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    Gamification for learning - using game elements - sounds very promising. Prior to the internet, technology, there were board games or hands on projects - all with the intent to engage and interact with each other. So it is no surprise to me given the appropriate design/project that students can learn and solve real world problems. Letting students choose their persona and role also allows them to make their own future and take ownership for how they want to participate. Just like the original promise of multimedia training that was purported to replace the traditional classroom events and enable getting the "best" teacher recorded for all to have the same experience...I believe it was then thought that the learning experience needs o be "blended". Different techniques - online, face to face, etc.. This is not my field of expertise so these are just personal opinions. If the online game approach can be combined with face to face and tactile/outdoor activities, aka a blended approach - I think that might be very useful. I do also believe that design solutions should be encouraging win win situations to reinforce collaboration and the feeling that all can succeed. One question I might have is how do you measure success in learning?
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    Gaming promoters unfortunately for me have a commercial agenda and its always difficult to make that balance of pure learning and commercialization aspect
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