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Tonya Thomas

Future Work Skills 2020 - 3 views

  • Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity.Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration.Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making.Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence.Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency.Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management.Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking.Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking.New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy.Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset.
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    "Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity. Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration. Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making. Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence. Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency. Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management. Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking. Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking. New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy. Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset."
Jennie Snyder

Dear Karl, Scott, Daniel, and John : The Future You Predicted Seems Right On Schedule | A Space for Learning - 40 views

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    Thoughtful post by Pam Moran on the skills and competencies our students need for future success. In it, she argues that the future is now and that we, as educators, need to rethink and redesign how we prepare students for their future. Must read.
Martin Burrett

The Future of Learning - 10 views

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    "It was once said 'It's difficult to make predictions, especially about the future'. There are so many factors, technological, political, societal, which could change the course of learning, but in this discussion we are future-gazing and trying to imagine what learning will look like in a generation from now and beyond."
Nigel Coutts

Reflections from The Future of Education Conference - The Learner's Way - 9 views

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    The Future of Education is a topic often discussed, and at the recent gathering of educators in Florence, it was the title and theme for the conference. Now in its ninth year, The Future of Education is an international conference that attracts educators from around the world and across all domains touched by education. The conference is an inspiring two days of discussion and sharing, with the city of Florence, the centre of the Renaissance, providing a constant reminder of what might be possible when creativity and critical thinking combine. Here are my key takeaways from this event.
Mark Gleeson

Future proof your Education - 115 views

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    This blogpost takes a close look at the skills required to be prepared for the future. It discusses the importance of a skills based curriculum rather than a narrow content based one. Its inspiration is a brilliantly designed Prezi focused on future Proofing Education. A detailed read.
Barbara Moose

Careers of the Future - 39 views

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    Converge Magazine article on careers of the future
massicg

The Future of the Phone Transcript - On The Media - 1 views

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    The Future of the Phone: an interview with Tom Vanderbilt, who says the phone call's day may be passing.
massicg

Is Sweden's Classroom-Free School the Future of Learning? - Education - GOOD - 2 views

  • Vittra doesn't award traditional grades, either—students are taught in groups according to level—so maximizing diverse teaching and learning situations is a priority. The open nature of the campus and the unusual furniture arrangements reflect the school's philosophy that "children play and learn on the basis of their needs, curiosity, and inclination." That's true for kids all over the world, so let's hope educators in other countries begin to pay attention.
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    Is Sweden's Classroom-Free School the Future of Learning?
pepe1976

SLAVERY | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) - 26 views

  • SLAVERY. Texas was the last frontier of slavery in the United States. In fewer than fifty years, from 1821 to 1865, the "Peculiar Institution," as Southerners called it, spread over the eastern two-fifths of the state. The rate of growth accelerated rapidly during the 1840s and 1850s. The rich soil of Texas held much of the future of slavery, and Texans knew it. James S. Mayfield undoubtedly spoke for many when he told the Constitutional Convention of 1845 that "the true policy and prosperity of this country depend upon the maintenance" of slavery. Slavery as an institution of significance in Texas began in Stephen F. Austin's colony. The original empresario commission given Moses Austin by Spanish authorities in 1821 did not mention slaves, but when Stephen Austin was recognized as heir to his father's contract later that year, it was agreed that settlers could receive eighty acres of land for each bondsman brought to Texas. Enough of Austin's original 300 families brought slaves with them that a census of his colony in 1825 showed 443 in a total population of 1,800. The independence of Mexico cast doubt on the future of the institution in Texas. From 1821 until 1836 both the national government in Mexico City and the state government of Coahuila and Texas threatened to restrict or destroy black servitude. Neither government adopted any consistent or effective policy to prevent slavery in Texas; nevertheless, their threats worried slaveholders and possibly retarded the immigration of planters from the Old South. In 1836 Texas had an estimated population of 38,470, only 5,000 of whom were slaves.
  • SLAVERY . Texas was the last frontier of slavery in the United States. In fewer than fifty years, from 1821 to 1865, the "Peculiar Institution," as Southerners called it, spread over the eastern two-fifths of the state. The rate of growth accelerated rapidly during the 1840s and 1850s. The rich soil of Texas held much of the future of slavery, and Texans knew it. James S. Mayfield undoubtedly spoke for many when he told the Constitutional Convention of 1845 that "the true policy and prosperity of this country depend upon the maintenance" of slavery. Slavery as an institution of significance in Texas began in Stephen F. Austin 's colony. The original empresario commission given Moses Austin by Spanish authorities in 1821 did not mention slaves, but when Stephen Austin was recognized as heir to his father's contract later that year, it was agreed that settlers could receive eighty acres of land for each bondsman brought to Texas. Enough of Austin's original 300 families brought slaves with them that a census of his colony in 1825 showed 443 in a total population of 1,800. The independence of Mexico cast doubt on the future of the institution in Texas. From 1821 until 1836 both the national government in Mexico City and the state government of Coahuila and Texas threatened to restrict or destroy black servitude. Neither government adopted any consistent or effective policy to prevent slavery in Texas; nevertheless, their threats worried slaveholders and possibly retarded the immigration of planters from the Old South. In 1836 Texas had an estimated population of 38,470, only 5,000 of whom were slaves
  • States. In fewer than fifty years, from 1821 to 1865, the "Peculiar Institution," as Southerners called it, spread over the eastern two-fifths of the state. The rate of growth accelerated rapidly during the 1840s and 1850s. The rich soil of Texas held much of the future of slavery, and Texans knew it. James S. Mayfield undoubtedly spoke for many when he told the Constitutional Convention of 1845 that "the true policy and prosperity of this country depend upon the maintenance" of slavery. Slavery as an institution of significance in Texas began in Stephen F. Austin 's colony
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    The issue of Slavery in Texas before, during and post Texas Revolution and the establishment of a new government.
Roland Gesthuizen

Digital Aristotle: Thoughts on the Future of Education - YouTube - 30 views

  • Some thoughts on teachers, students and the Future of Education.The book kid me is holding in the video is The Way Things Work. If there's a bookish child in your life, you should get them a copy
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    "Some thoughts on teachers, students and the Future of Education. The book kid me is holding in the video is The Way Things Work. If there's a bookish child in your life, you should get them a copy"
Steve Ransom

Talentism: My Son Won't Do His Homework - 2 views

  • Every employer I know of (and I would assume that you are no exception Colin) wants engaged employees who are passionate about their jobs. Most employers do not want employees who hate their work but persist through it anyway. It is a fallacy to believe that we are teaching our kids that the heart of innovative capability (and therefore their future job prospects) is best served by doing something you hate for an extended period of time no matter the consequences.
  • But I have to focus on what will get them work, even if that will hurt them, society, the companies that hire them and everyone around them.
  • "Why are you so convinced that my son is going to be an academic or an investment banker?" Because as far as I can tell, those are the only two things that schools prepare kids to be.
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  • and that the stuff that he loves (art and music and video games) will be a great future for him and the stuff he hates (math and science) is something he will never compete in, never have a chance at.
  • But school doesn’t care, because school does not have the objective of helping my son produce the maximum amount of value in the future that he will probably encounter. School cares about ensuring that he knows how to take tests, follow directions and can do math that he will never have to care about for the rest of his life.
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    Most employers do not want employees who hate their work but persist through it anyway. It is a fallacy to believe that we are teaching our kids that the heart of innovative capability (and therefore their future job prospects) is best served by doing something you hate for an extended period of time no matter the consequences.
Amy Burns

FutureMe.org: Write a Letter to the Future - 73 views

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    As we are moving to the end of the year, it might be fun for those of us with seniors to have them send themselves an email, to be delivered on a specific date in the future. You can do that (as long as you keep the same email address) at this site.
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    Interesting concept--write a letter to yourself and have it delivered at a future date.
Elizabeth Resnick

Video: "The Future Will Not be Multiple Choice" | MindShift - 4 views

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    TED talk on Design in Education and the future of education
Jon Tanner

Jesse Schell's mindblowing talk on the future of games (DICE 2010) « fox @ fury - 54 views

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    Here is an interesting (and very entertaining) presentation at game designer conference, talking about the way game design is invading the real world. It's a fascinating look at future possibilities, including the intentional influence on school and society- making people behave better through game design. Be warned, he uses some words that are inappropriate for school.
Steven Szalaj

Thinking for the Future - NYTimes.com - 60 views

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    Though-provoking piece about the kinds of skills might be needed in a future dictated by mega-data analysis.  It speculates how people might be needed to keep the "human" in "humanity."
Randolph Hollingsworth

"Promises" of Online Higher Ed: Profits - Campaign for the Future of Higher Education | Campaign for the Future of Higher Education - 12 views

  • the burning questions focus squarely and exclusively on what will make money for particular companies
  • use their powerful brand reputations to get ahead of rapid technological changes that could destabilize their residential business models over the long-run
  • good credit news for elite institutions
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    on the revolutionary aspect of MOOCs to break down traditional barriers to higher ed as regularly stated by CEOs Koller and Thrun: "This rhetoric is perhaps the most glittery yet in the public discourse about online higher education. But it is also a diversion shifting attention away from the logic of profit-making. For parents, students, and the general public who focus primarily on what education means for people's futures, for social mobility, for a healthy economy and a robust democracy, a dip into the insider talk of MOOCs, their investors, and industry analysts is both instructive and disorienting."
anonymous

1.0 Media Reports on 2.0 Realities: On Recording, Streaming, and Livestreaming - 52 views

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    Story-driven reporting closes down the future; idea-driven inquiry makes the future open-ended.
Michele Brown

Could This be Your Classroom of the Future - 80 views

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    This will make you excited abut the future or envious about what you want in your classroom. This video shows the possibilities of technology and education working together. Produced by Intel, it shows a class of students working with physics and bridge design.
Nigel Coutts

How might we prepare our students for an unknown future? - The Learner's Way - 8 views

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    How might we prepare our students for an unknown future? If we accept that we are living in times of rapid change and that the world our children will inhabit is likely to be very different from the world of today, or perhaps more importantly, different from the work our current education system was designed to serve, what should we do to ensure our children are able to thrive?
Nigel Coutts

A New Renaissance - The Future of Education — The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    This week I am in Florence having spent two days at "The Future of Education" conference. Visiting this city, which has played such a significant role in western history, is inspiring. It encourages one to not only look back at what was, but also to look ahead at what might be, especially when the t
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