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arianelfv

DOF - Diario Oficial de la Federación - 4 views

  • Cobertura (tasa bruta de escolarización) en Educación media superior y superior1 (1990-2012) Ciclo escolar Media superior (15 a 17 años) Superior (18 a 23 años) Superior (18 a 22 años)       Incluye posgrado No incluye posgrado Total Hombres Mujeres Total Hombres Mujeres Total Hombres Mujeres 1990-1991 34.1 34.7 color
    • arianelfv
       
      Evidencia: cruzarla con aumento de uso de plataformas virtuales para mostrar que la cobertura se eleva en función del uso de las plataformas
taconi12

2008 World Population Data Sheet - Population Reference Bureau - 61 views

  • United States Italy Dem. Rep. Congo Population mid-2008 305 million 60 million 67 million Population 2050 (projected) 438 million 62 million 189 million Lifetime births per woman 2.1 1.3 6.5 Percent of population below age 15 20% 14% 47% Percent of population ages 65+ 13% 20% 3% Life expectancy at birth 78 years 81 years 53 years Annual births 4.3 million 568,120 2.9 million Annual deaths 2.4 million 575,300 0.8 million Annual births minus deaths 1.9 million -7,200 2.1 million Percent of population undernourished <2.5%
    • taconi12
       
      the stat about mortality in women is amazing.  make sure to use in lesson plan
  • Worldwide, women now average 2.6 children during their lifetimes, 3.2 in developing countries excluding China, and 4.7 in the least developed countries. Lifetime fertility is highest in sub-Saharan Africa at 5.4 children per woman. In the developed countries, women average 1.6 children. The United States, with an average of 2.1 children, is an exception to this low-fertility pattern in the world’s wealthier countries.
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  • n those countries, 1 in 75 women still die from pregnancy-related causes. In both sub-Saharan Africa and in the 50 countries defined by the United Nations as least developed, that risk is a shocking 1 in 22. In stark contrast, about 1 in 6,000 women in the developed countries die from pregnancy-related causes.
  • es fewer than the minimum calories required to lead a healthy active life. That figure rises above 60 percent in several sub-Saharan countries.
  • developed countries, 35 percent of the population consum
maruxa77

TIC para innovar: Clase invertida (flipped classroom) ventajas y desventajas - 1 views

  • Clase invertida (flipped classroom) ventajas y desventajas   La clase invertida propone que el aprendizaje de los estudiantes se suscite fuera de la clase. Este modelo pedagógico o estrategia didáctica ofrece una forma de aprendizaje semi presencial ya que los estudiantes pueden aprender desde sus casas mediante juegos, presentaciones, videos, podcast, ejercicios en línea, y tanto los docentes como estudiantes interactúan para resolver problemas. Esto denota un consumo menor de tiempo en el aula que se puede ocupar para otras actividades, sin más deseo compartirles las ventajas y desventajas de la Clase invertida: Ventajas: 1.       Adaptabilidad de la clase se adapta al ritmo del estudiante. 2.       Mejora significativamente el ambiente de trabajo en el aula. 3.       Incrementa la atención educativa a cada estudiantes 4.       Empata el estilo de aprendizaje de cada estudiante. 5.       Transforma la clase en un espacio de interactividad 6.       Incluye a todos los miembros de la comunidad educativa en el proceso de aprendizaje. 7.       Promueve la creatividad y el pensamiento crítico. 8.       Facilita la entrega de tareas y su revisión. 9.       Disminuye el riesgo del incumplimiento en clase. 10.   Permite la reusabilidad del material propuesto. 11.   Origina el ahorro de tiempo extra para el profesor. 12.   Promueve la interacción social. 13.   Incentiva a la resolución de problemas en clase. 14.   Mejora la actitud de los estudiantes hacia la materia. 15.   Incrementa el interés el interés y la motivación. 16.   Genera la satisfacción de toda la comunidad educativa al estar inmersos en el proceso. 17.   El feedback se genera de manera inmediata. 18.   Acerca a los estudiantes al conocimiento de manera simple. 19.   Evalúa no solo el resultado, si no, el proceso entero. 20.   Los estudiantes son responsables de su propio aprendizaje. 21.   Permite la regeneración de contenidos las veces necesarias. Desventajas 1.       Se debe estructura el plan en mejora de la metodología. 2.       Se enfoca en los recursos más que en la metodología en sí. 3.       No toma en cuenta la brecha digital existente. 4.       Los vídeos en casa deben ser asistidos por algún representante, demandando tiempo. 5.     &nbs
Dallas McPheeters

World's Simplest Online Safety Policy by Lisa Nielsen - 88 views

  • Students can access websites that do not contain or that filter mature content. They can use their real names, pictures, and work (as long it doesn’t have a grade/score from a school) with the notification and/or permission of the student and their parent or guardian
  •  Anyone can begin making a difference and contributing real work at any age.
  • what puts kids at risk are things like: having a lot of conflict with your parents being depressed and socially isolated being hyper communicating with a lot of people who you don't know being willing to talk about sex with people that you don't know having a pattern of multiple risky activities going to sex sites and chat rooms, meeting lots of people there, and behaving like an Internet daredevil.
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  • Rules for tools don’t make sense. Rules for behaviors do.
  • It applies only to minors in places that apply for erate funds
  • The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction from children under 13 years of age.
  • She uses Facebook with her First grade students
  • While children under 13 can legally give out personal information with their parents' permission
  • he Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records
  • Schools may disclose, without consent, information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance.
  • applies to all schools that receive fund
  • addresses children’s education records
  • as long as it is not a grade or score
  • permission is not necessary
  •  
    what puts kids at risk are things like: having a lot of conflict with your parents being depressed and socially isolated being hyper communicating with a lot of people who you don't know being willing to talk about sex with people that you don't know having a pattern of multiple risky activities going to sex sites and chat rooms, meeting lots of people there, and behaving like an Internet daredevil.
Ross Davis

islt9440 - Group 7: Diigo for Education - About diigo.com - 86 views

  • Diigo highlighting tool allows the teacher or student to highlight in an article or a web page
  • The key concepts or vocabulary words could be highlighted to check for understanding. Some students have problems determining what should be highlighted in an article or passage. Teachers could use this tool to demonstrate how to correctly highlight and find the key points.
  • About diigo.com page Details and Tags Print Download PDF Backlinks Source Delete Rename Redirect Permissions Lock discussion history notify me Protected Details last edit by cmh459 Sunday, 7:53 pm - 36 revisions Tags none About diigo.comDiigo or Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff is a social bookmarking site that allows its users to bookmark and tag websites. Users are also able to highlight information and put sticky notes directly on the webpage as you are reading it. Your notes can be public which allows other users to view and comment on your notes and add their own or it can be private. Sites can be saved and stored for later reading and commenting. Users can also join groups with similar interests and follow specific people and sites. Teachers can register for an educator account that allows a teacher to create accounts for an entire class. In an education account, students are automatically set up as a Diigo group which allows for easy sharing of documents, pictures, videos, and articles with only your class group. There are also pre-set privacy settings so only the teacher and classmates can see the bookmarks and communications. This is a great way to ensure that your students and their comments are kept private from the rest of the Internet community. Diigo is a great tool for teachers to use to have students interact with material and to share that interaction with classmates. Best Practices for using Diigo tools Tagging Tool Teachers or students can tag a website that they want to bookmark for future reference. Teachers can research websites or articles that they want their students to view on a certain topic and tag them for the students. This tool is nice when researching a certain topic. The teacher can tag the websites that the students should use eliminating the extra time of searching for the sites that would be useful and appropriate for the project.Highlighting Tool Diigo highlighting tool allows the teacher or student to highlight in an article or a web page . 1The key concepts or vocabulary words could be highlighted to check for understanding. Some students have problems determining what should be highlighted in an article or passage. Teachers could use this tool to demonstrate how to correctly highlight and find the key points. Sticky Notes Tool The sticky note tool is a great addition to the tools of diigo. Students may add sticky notes to a passage as they are reading it. The sticky notes could be used to make notes or ask questions by the students. Teachers could postition the sticky notes in the passage for students to respond to various ideas as they are reading. Students could use sticky notes to peer edit and make comments on other student's work through Google docs. These are just a few ideas of how to apply the diigo tools to your teaching practices. Both students and teachers benefit form using these tools. The variety of uses or practices give both groups a hands on way of dealing with text while making it more efficient. Bookmark/Snapsho
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  • islt9440 - Group 7: Diigo for Education guest · Join · Help · Sign In · Join this Wiki Recent Changes Manage Wiki Group 7 Project HomeDiigo RSS FeedsSample Lesson Plans Social Studies Spanish Math (Functions) Math (Geometry) Collaboration Pages Collaboration Home Job Assignments Project Info Lesson Plan Ideas About diigo.com page Details and Tags Print Download PDF Backlinks Source Delete Rename Redirect Permissions Lock discussion history notify me Protected Details last edit by cmh459 Sunday, 7:53 pm - 36 revisions Tags none About diigo.com Diigo or Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff is a social bookmarking site that allows its users to bookmark and tag websites. Users are also able to highlight information and put sticky notes directly on the webpage as you are reading it. Your notes can be public which allows other users to view and comment on your notes and add their own or it can be private. Sites can be saved and stored for later reading and commenting. Users can also join groups with si
  • Diigo or Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff is a social bookmarking site that allows its users to bookmark
  • and tag websites
  • Diigo highlighting tool allows the teacher or student to highlight in an article or a web page.
  • The key concepts or vocabulary words could be highlighted to check for understanding
  • Diigo highlighting tool allows the teacher or student to highlight in an article or a web page. The key concepts or vocabulary words could be highlighted to check for understanding
  • Diigo highlighting tool allows the teacher or student to highlight in an article or a web page. The key concepts or vocabulary words could be highlighted to check for understanding. Some students have problems determining what should be highlighted in an article or passage. Teachers could use this tool to demonstrate how to correctly highlight and find the key points.
  • Diigo highlighting tool allows the teacher or student to highlight in an article or a web page.
  • Teachers or students can tag a website that they want to bookmark for future reference. Teachers can research websites or articles that they want their students to view on a certain topic and tag them for the students.This tool is nice when researching a certain topic. The teacher can tag the websites that the students should use eliminating the extra time of searching for the sites that would be useful and appropriate for the project.
  • The sticky note tool is a great addition to the tools of diigo. Students may add sticky notes to a passage as they are reading it. The sticky notes could be used to make notes or ask questions by the students.Teachers could postition the sticky notes in the passage for students to respond to various ideas as they are reading.Students could use sticky notes to peer edit and make comments on other student's work through Google docs.
  •  
    My group for my grad class, "Learning with the Internet" created this wiki about using and implementing Diigo in the classroom.
Jac Londe

Cartes de Montréal - 1 views

  • Cartes actuelle de la ville de Montréal
  • Cartes des quartiers et arrondissements de Montréal
  • Cartes du quartier Centre-Ville (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Côte-des-Neiges - Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Rosemont (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Outremont (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Plateau Mont-Royal (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Ahuntsic / Cartierville (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Villeray / Saint-Michel (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Hochelaga-Maisonneuve (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Lachine (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Verdun (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Saint-Léonard (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Westmount (PDF) »» Cartes du quartier Saint-Henri / Petite-Bourgogne (PDF) »» Arrondissement Rivière-des-Prairies Pointe-aux-Trembles (PDF) »» Autres plans Carte détaillée du Montréal Souterrain (PDF) »» Carte détaillée du Montréal Souterrain par la STM (PDF) »» Carte détaillée du Montréal Souterrain RESO (PDF) »» Carte des pistes cyclables de Montréal et ses banlieues(PDF) (PDF) »» Pistes cyclables de la Ville de Montréal(PDF) (PDF) »» Plan du campus de l'Université de Montreal (PDF) »» Plan du campus de l'UQAM »» Carte du réseau d'autoroute du grand Montréal (PDF) »» Plan du Vieux Port de Montréal (PDF) »» Voir aussi: cartes sur le site de la STM
Jeremy Brueck

Navigating Text Complexity - 80 views

  • Includes lesson videos and model text-dependent questions.
  • Our text complexity roadmaps bring together the quantiative, qualitative, and reader and task considerations of texts.
  • take a close look at what text complexity is and why it's important to preparing students for college and career.
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  • what makes a text complex
  • how will it help prepare my students for college and career?
  • What tools can I use to select rich, worthy texts for instruction in my classroom?
  • How can analyzing the qualitative characteristics of a text inform my instruction of a text?
  •  
    "Understanding text complexity is essential to implementing the Common Core State Standards in ELA & Literacy. But what makes a text complex and how will it help prepare my students for college and career? What tools can I use to select rich, worthy texts for instruction in my classroom? How can analyzing the qualitative characteristics of a text inform my instruction of a text? These have been our guiding questions in developing this text complexity resource for teachers. "
Bob Rowan

Weblogg-ed - 2 views

  • no better place for my children to watch that speech (or any other, for that matter) than in a place where ideas are encouraged, where critical thinking about those ideas is a natural part of the conversation, and where appropriate response and debate can flourish. Where the adults in the room lead my kids to dig deeper, to validate facts, and consider the many levels of context in which every speech and every debate takes place. Where the discussion around it is such that it lays to rest the concern that many seem to have about this particular speech in general, that in some way the President will be able to “indoctrinate” our kids into some socialist mindset. If schools are the fully functioning learning communities that we hope they are, they should be the place where our kids learn to make sense of ideas, not to fear them. That, however, is not the message we are sending.
    • C Clausen
       
      Isn't it ironic that the very things that we fought for and received via the US Constitution, Civil Rights, etc. are the very things that students are today losing? As an American History teacher I talk about the past, present, and future and show my students how things have/have not changed throughout time. I begin the year by reading the "True Story of the 3 Little Pigs," and talk about J.S. Mill and his challenge to others to question. Is society truly against the educating of its students to have an open-mind, ask questions, and look at many perspectives?
  • In the midst of all of the “uproar” over the President’s planned speech to school kids on Tuesday, I keep thinking about what all of this says about schools, about what they are for, and about the perception that a lot of people in this country have of them.
    • Michelle Ohanian
       
      My English Language Learners were very positive about the speech and couldn't understand all the uproar. Aren't we teaching in government funded schools? Well my young adults liked the message of responsibilty. I have also taught the true story of the 3 little pigs but my ELLs weren/t really familiar with the original version. It helped with point of view from the orignal version.
  • thin walls
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  • thin walls
  •  
    Education Speech
  •  
    Education Speech
  •  
    Will Richardson is Mr. Utopian Education to a lot of people. Even if you don't agree with everything he says, most folks agree that he offers thought-provoking topics.
kellidgegroup

Online text to speech (TTS) converter - SpokenText.net - 14 views

  • What is SpokenText.net? SpokenText lets you easily convert text into speech. Record (English, French, Spanish or German) PDF, Word, plain text, PowerPoint files, and web pages, and convert them to speech automatically. Download your reccordings as .mp3 or .m4b (Audio Book) files (in English, French, Spanish and German)
  • great way to check your writing for grammar and spelling errors
  • What is SpokenText.net? SpokenText lets you easily convert text into speech. Record (English, French, Spanish or German) PDF, Word, plain text, PowerPoint files, and web pages, and convert them to speech automatically. Download your reccordings as .mp3 or .m4b (Audio Book) files (in English, French, Spanish and German)
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  • What is SpokenText.net? SpokenText lets you easily convert text into speech. Record (English, French, Spanish or German) PDF, Word, plain text, PowerPoint files, and web pages, and convert them to speech automatically. Download your reccordings as .mp3 or .m4b (Audio Book) files (in English, French, Spanish and German) of any text content on your computer or mobile phone.
  • Record books, articles,web pages, your papers class notes or any other text content
  • convert text into speech. Record (English, French, Spanish or German) PDF, Word, plain text, PowerPoint files, and web pages, and convert them to speech automatically.
  •  
    SpokenText lets you easily convert text into speech. Record (English, French, Spanish or German) PDF, Word, plain text, PowerPoint files, and web pages, and convert them to speech automatically.
  •  
    SpokenText converts any text into clear natural sounding speech. Convert documents, web pages or just copy and paste the text you want to convert, then learn while on the go
meghankelly492

Project MUSE - Learning from Masters of Music Creativity: Shaping Compositional Experie... - 7 views

  • n contrast to others who are not as prone to divulge their feelings about their creative process
  • "Variation in style may have historical explanation but [End Page 94] no philosophical justification, for philosophy cannot discriminate between style and style."3
  • The testimonies of the composers concerned bear on questions about (a) the role of the conscious and the unconscious in music creativity, (b) how the compositional process gets started, and (c) how the compositional process moves forward
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  • It is hoped that the themes that emerge by setting twentieth and twenty-first century professional composers' accounts of certain compositional experiences or phases of their creative processes against one another will provide a philosophical framework for teaching composition.
  • Furthermore, the knowledge of how professional composers compose offers the potential of finding the missing link in music education; that is, the writing of music by students within the school curriculum
  • Such involvement may deepen their understanding of musical relationships and how one articulates feelings through sounds beyond rudimentary improvisational and creative activities currently available
  • raw philosophical implications for music composition in schools from recognized composers' voices about their individual composing realities
  • It is hoped that the direct access to these composers' thoughts about the subjective experience of composing Western art music in the second half of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first century may also promote the image of a fragmented culture whose ghettoization in music education is a serious impediment to the development of a comprehensive aesthetic education.
  • n other words, there is a striking unanimity among composers that the role of the unconscious is vital in order to start and/or to complete a work to their own satisfaction.
  • I need . . . to become involved, to come into a state where I do something without knowing why I do i
  • This is a complex problem and difficult to explain: all that one can say is that the unconscious plays an incalculable rol
  • Nonetheless, these self-observations about the complementary roles of the unconscious and conscious aspects of musical creativity do not cover the wide range of claims in psychological research on creativity
  • I strongly believe that, if we cannot explain this process, then we must acknowledge it as a mystery.25 Mysteries are not solved by encouraging us not to declare them to be mysteries
  • When Ligeti was commissioned to write a companion piece for Brahms' Horn Trio, he declared, "When the sound of an instrument or a group of instruments or the human voice finds an echo in me, in the musical idea within me, then I can sit down and compose. [O]therwise I canno
  • Extra-musical images may also provide the composer with ideas and material and contribute to musical creativity.
  • ome composers need to have something for it to react against.38 Xenakis, however, asserted that "all truly creative people escape this foolish side of work, the exaltation of sentiments. They are to be discarded like the fat surrounding meat before it is cooked."
  • as, as these examples show, dreams can also solve certain problems of the creative process.
  • In other words, to compose does not mean to merely carry out an initial idea. The composer reserves the right to change his or her mind after the conception of an idea.
  • n sum, self-imposed restrictions or "boundary conditions"55 seem to provide composers with a kind of pretext to choose from an otherwise chaotic multitude of compositional possibilities that, however, gradually disappears and gets absorbed into the process of composition which is characterized by the composers' aesthetic perceptions and choices.
  • Therefore, it is not surprising that influences from the musical world in which the composer lives play an important role in the creative process
  • Thereby the past is seen as being comprised by a static system of rules and techniques that needs to be innovated and emancipated during the composers' search for their own musical identity.
  • I strongly suggest that we play down basics like who influenced whom, and instead study the way the influence is transformed; in other words: how the artist made it his own.
  • Nothing I found was based on the "masterpiece," on the closed cycle, on passive contemplation or narrowly aesthetic pleasure.61
  • Furthermore, for some composers the musical influence can emerge from the development of computer technology.
  • In sum, the compositional process proceeds in a kind of personal and social tension. In many cases, composers are faced with the tensive conflict between staying with tradition and breaking new ground at each step in the process. Thus, one might conclude that the creative process springs from a systematic viewpoint determined by a number of choices in which certain beliefs, ideas, and influences—by no means isolated from the rest of the composer's life—play a dominant role in the search for new possibilities of expression.
  • If a general educational approach is to emerge from the alloy of composers' experiences of their music creativity, it rests on the realization that the creative process involves a diversity of idiosyncratic conscious and unconscious traits.
  • After all, the creative process is an elusive cultural activity with no recipes for making it happen.
  • n this light, the common thread of composers' idiosyncratic concerns and practices that captures the overall aura of their music creativity pertains to (a) the intangibility of the unconscious throughout the compositional process,68 (b) the development of musical individuality,69 and (c) the desire to transgress existing rules and codes, due to their personal and social conflict between tradition and innovation.70
  • In turn, by making student composers in different classroom settings grasp the essence of influential professional composers' creative concerns, even if they do not intend to become professional composers, we can help them immerse in learning experiences that respect the mysteries of their intuitions, liberate their own practices of critical thinking in music, and dare to create innovative music that expresses against-the-prevailing-grain musical beliefs and ideas.
  • Therefore, it is critical that the music teacher be seen as the facilitator of students' compositional processes helping students explore and continuously discover their own creative personalities and, thus, empowering their personal involvement with music. Any creative work needs individual attention and encouragement for each vision and personal experience are different.
  • After all, the quality of mystery is a common theme in nearly every composer's accoun
  • Failing this, musical creativity remains a predictable academic exercise
  • Music teachers need to possess the generosity to refuse to deny student composers the freedom to reflect their own insights back to them and, in turn, influence the teachers' musical reality
  • Indeed, it is important that music teachers try to establish students gradually as original, independent personalities who try to internalize sounds and, thus, unite themselves with their environment in a continuous creative process.
  • Music teachers, therefore, wishing student composers to express and exercise all their ideas, should grant them ample time to work on their compositions,
  • n sum, music knowledge or techniques and the activation of the student composers' desire for discovery and innovation should evolve together through balanced stimulation.
  • While music creativity has been a component of music education research for decades, some of the themes arising from professional composers' experiences of their creativity, such as the significance of the unconscious, the apprehension towards discovering ones' own musical language, or the personal and social tension between tradition and innovation, among others, have not been adequately recognized in the literature of music education
  • By doing this, I strongly believe that musical creativity in general and composing in particular run the risk of becoming a predictable academic exercise
  • which merely demands problem-solving skills on the part of the student composers (or alleged "critical thinkers").
  • . On the other hand, only few music educators appear to draw their composer students' attention to the importance of the personal and social conflict between staying within a tradition or code, even if it is the Western popular music tradition, and breaking new ground at each step in the creative process and, possibly, shaping new traditions or codes.
  • Culture is a precious human undertaking, and the host of musics, arts, languages, religions, myths, and rituals that comprise it need to be carefully transmitted to the young and transformed in the process."85
  • Nevertheless, further research is needed in which women's voices can be heard that may offer an emancipatory perspective for the instruction of composition in education which will "challenge the political domination of men."
meghankelly492

Ms. Kelly's Music Class - 1 views

  • Google Classroom page
  • Google Classroom page
  • CLICK HERE!
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  • March 30-April 3
  • For example (to the tune of Bohemian Rhapsody)Is this the real life?Maybe just allergies?Caught in a lockdownNo escape from the familyDon't touch your eyes, Just hand sanitize quickly!
  • Is this the real life?Maybe just allergies?Caught in a lockdownNo escape from the familyDon't touch your eyes, Just hand sanitize quickly!
  • For example (to the tune of Bohemian Rhapsody)
  • Each week I will post a fun activity to try if you would like.  Anyone in the school can complete the task! Send your final product to Ms. Kelly: meghan.kelly@springsschool.org and a winner will be chosen and featured on my website!YOUR TASK: Create a "Parody" of a song that describes what is happening right now in the world. Take a song and re-write the words to talk about social-distancing/ staying at home/however you are feeling. Make a video of you singing, dancing, and send the words and video to Ms. Kelly. One winner will be chosen. Good luck!
  • No escape from th
  • family
  • Maybe just allergies?
  • aught in a lockdown
Mr. Eason

Educational Leadership:Reading: The Core Skill:The Challenge of Challenging Text - 131 views

  • The new standards instead propose that teachers move students purposefully through increasingly complex text to build skill and stamina.
  • higher-order thinking in reading depends heavily on knowledge of word meanings.
  • Students' ability to comprehend a piece of text depends on the number of unfamiliar domain-specific words and new general academic terms they encounter.
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  • If students are to interpret the meanings such complex sentence structures convey, they need to learn how to make sense of the conventions of text—phrasing, word order, punctuation, and language.
  • Students who are aware of the patterns authors use to communicate complex information have an advantage in making sense of text.
  • maintaining understanding across a text.
  • Students' background knowledge, including developmental, experiential, and cognitive factors, influences their ability to understand the explicit and inferential qualities of a text.
  • building skills, establishing purpose, and fostering motivation.
  • even students who have basic decoding skills sometimes struggle to deploy these skills easily and accurately enough to get a purchase on challenging text. To help these students develop reading fluency, teachers should give them lots of practice with reading the same text, as well as instruction to help them develop a stronger sense of where to pause in sentences, how to group words, and how their voices should rise or fall at various junctures when reading aloud.
  • A final determinant of text difficulty, however, depends on the reader's prior knowledge.
  • pair repeated readings of the same text with questions that require the student to read closely for detail and key ideas.
  • Ongoing, solid vocabulary instruction
  • also on general academic words.
  • also explore the connections among words,
  • In contrast, in reading history and literature, readers need to be concerned with not just the causes of events, but also the human intentions behind these causes.
  • teachers should not convey so much information that it spoils the reading or enables students to participate in class without completing the reading; rather, they should let students know what learning to expect from the reading.
  • Teachers may be tempted to try to make it easier for students by avoiding difficult texts. The problem is, easier work is less likely to make readers stronger.
  • You need to create successive successes.
  • Students experience success in the company of their teacher, who combines complex texts with effective instruction.
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    What makes text difficult and how to teach skills for successful comprehension.
Jac Londe

U.S. Code: Title 17 - COPYRIGHTS | LII / Legal Information Institute - 48 views

  • U.S. Code › Title 17 U.S. Code: Title 17 - COPYRIGHTS
  • CHAPTER 1—SUBJECT MATTER AND SCOPE OF COPYRIGHT (§§ 101–122) CHAPTER 2—COPYRIGHT OWNERSHIP AND TRANSFER (§§ 201–205) CHAPTER 3—DURATION OF COPYRIGHT (§§ 301–305) CHAPTER 4—COPYRIGHT NOTICE, DEPOSIT, AND REGISTRATION (§§ 401–412) CHAPTER 5—COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT AND REMEDIES (§§ 501–513) CHAPTER 6—IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION (§§ 601–603) CHAPTER 7—COPYRIGHT OFFICE (§§ 701–710) CHAPTER 8—PROCEEDINGS BY COPYRIGHT ROYALTY JUDGES (§§ 801–805) CHAPTER 9—PROTECTION OF SEMICONDUCTOR CHIP PRODUCTS (§§ 901–914) CHAPTER 10—DIGITAL AUDIO RECORDING DEVICES AND MEDIA (§§ 1001–1010) CHAPTER 11—SOUND RECORDINGS AND MUSIC VIDEOS (§ 1101) CHAPTER 12—COPYRIGHT PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (§§ 1201–1205) CHAPTER 13—PROTECTION OF ORIGINAL DESIGNS (§§ 1301–1332)
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    Everything to you must know about copyrights for your work and the work of your students.
Kenuvis Romero

The Art of Memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

  • The Art of Memory From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For the general topic known as "Ars memoriae" or "the Art of Memory", see Art of memory. The Art of Memory Author(s) Frances A. Yates Country United Kingdom Language English Publisher Routledge and Kegan Paul Publication date 1966 Media type Print (book) Pages 400 ISBN 0-226-95001-8 OCLC Number 42905743  Preceded by Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition The Art of Memory is a 1966 non-fiction book by British historian Frances A. Yates. The book follows the history of mnemonic systems from the classical period of Simonides of Ceos in Ancient Greece to the Renaissance era of Giordano Bruno, ending with Gottfried Leibniz and the early emergence of the scientific method in the 17th century. See also [edit] Method of loci John Crowley Art of Memory
Amy Roediger

Reading Strategies for 'Informational Text' - NYTimes.com - 172 views

  • Four Corners and Anticipation Guides:Both of these techniques “activate schema” by asking students to react in some way to a series of controversial statements about a topic they are about to study. In Four Corners, students move around the room to show their degree of agreement or disagreement with various statements — about, for instance, the health risks of tanning, or the purpose of college, or dystopian teen literature. An anticipation guide does the same thing, though generally students simply react in writing to a list of statements on a handout. In this warm-up to a lesson on some of the controversies currently raging over school reform, students can use the statements we provide in either of these ways.
  • Gallery Walks:A rich way to build background on a topic at the beginning of a unit (or showcase learning at the end), Gallery Walks for this purpose are usually teacher-created collections of images, articles, maps, quotations, graphs and other written and visual texts that can immerse students in information about a broad subject. Students circulate through the gallery, reading, writing and talking about what they see.
  • Graphic Organizers:
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  • Making Text-to-Text/Text-to-Self/Text-to-World connectionsCharting Debatable IssuesListing Facts/Questions/ResponsesIdentifying Cause and EffectSupporting Opinions With FactsTracking The Five W’s and an HIdentifying Multiple Points of ViewIdentifying a Problem and SolutionComparing With a Venn Diagram
  • The One-Pager:Almost any student can find a “way in” with this strategy, which involves reacting to a text by creating one page that shows an illustration, question and quote that sum up some key aspect of what a student learned.
  • “Popcorn Reads”:Invite students to choose significant words, phrases or whole sentences from a text or texts to read aloud in random fashion, without explanation. Though this may sound pointless until you try it, it is an excellent way for students to “hear” some of the high points or themes of a text emerge, and has the added benefit of being an activity any reader can participate in easily.
  • Illustrations:Have students create illustrations for texts they’re reading, either in the margins as they go along, or after they’ve finished. The point of the exercise is not, of course, to create beautiful drawings, but to help them understand and retain the information they learn.
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    Update | Feb. 2012: We'll be exploring the new Common Core State Standards, and how teaching with The Times can address them, through a series of blog posts. You can find them all here, tagged "the NYT and the CCSS."
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    A good list of reading strategies for informational text from the New York Times.
Jac Londe

17 U.S. Code § 113 - Scope of exclusive rights in pictorial, graphic, and scu... - 10 views

  • U.S. Code › Title 17 › Chapter 1 › § 113 17 U.S. Code § 113 - Scope of exclusive rights in pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works
  • (a) Subject to the provisions of subsections (b) and (c) of this section, the exclusive right to reproduce a copyrighted pictorial, graphic, or sculptural work in copies under section 106 includes the right to reproduce the work in or on any kind of article, whether useful or otherwise.
  • (b) This title does not afford, to the owner of copyright in a work that portrays a useful article as such, any greater or lesser rights with respect to the making, distribution, or display of the useful article so portrayed than those afforded to such works under the law, whether title 17 or the common law or statutes of a State, in effect on December 31, 1977, as held applicable and construed by a court in an action brought under this title.
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  • (c) In the case of a work lawfully reproduced in useful articles that have been offered for sale or other distribution to the public, copyright does not include any right to prevent the making, distribution, or display of pictures or photographs of such articles in connection with advertisements or commentaries related to the distribution or display of such articles, or in connection with news reports.
  • (d) (1) In a case in which— (A) a work of visual art has been incorporated in or made part of a building in such a way that removing the work from the building will cause the destruction, distortion, mutilation, or other modification of the work as described in section 106A (a)(3), and
  • (B) the author consented to the installation of the work in the building either before the effective date set forth in section 610(a) of the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990, or in a written instrument executed on or after such effective date that is signed by the owner of the building and the author and that specifies that installation of the work may subject the work to destruction, distortion, mutilation, or other modification, by reason of its removal,
  • then the rights conferred by paragraphs (2) and (3) of section 106A (a) shall not apply.
  • (2) If the owner of a building wishes to remove a work of visual art which is a part of such building and which can be removed from the building without the destruction, distortion, mutilation, or other modification of the work as described in section 106A (a)(3), the author’s rights under paragraphs (2) and (3) of section 106A (a) shall apply unless—
  • (A) the owner has made a diligent, good faith attempt without success to notify the author of the owner’s intended action affecting the work of visual art, or (B) the owner did provide such notice in writing and the person so notified failed, within 90 days after receiving such notice, either to remove the work or to pay for its removal.
  • For purposes of subparagraph (A), an owner shall be presumed to have made a diligent, good faith attempt to send notice if the owner sent such notice by registered mail to the author at the most recent address of the author that was recorded with the Register of Copyrights pursuant to paragraph (3). If the work is removed at the expense of the author, title to that copy of the work shall be deemed to be in the author.
  • (3) The Register of Copyrights shall establish a system of records whereby any author of a work of visual art that has been incorporated in or made part of a building, may record his or her identity and address with the Copyright Office. The Register shall also establish procedures under which any such author may update the information so recorded, and procedures under which owners of buildings may record with the Copyright Office evidence of their efforts to comply with this subsection.
Deborah Batzer

The Comic Book Periodic Table of the Elements - 177 views

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    This site contains comic book images linked to the chemical elements via the periodic table. Comics include Uncle $crooge, Metal Men, Metamorpho, Batman, Fantastic Four, Superman, and many more."> The Comic Book Periodic Table of the Elements BODY { color: rgb(0,0,0);} Th
SHARON DRESSEL

Coh-Metrix - 30 views

  • five major factors that account for most of the variance in texts across grade levels and text categories: word concreteness, syntactic simplicity, referential cohesion, causal cohesion, and narrativity
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    Computer analyses of text characteristics are often used by reading teachers, researchers, and policy makers when selecting texts for students. The authors of this article identify components of language, discourse, and cognition that underlie traditional automated metrics of text difficulty and their new Coh-Metrix system. Coh-Metrix analyzes texts on multiple measures of language and discourse that are aligned with multilevel theoretical frameworks of comprehension. The authors discuss five major factors that account for most of the variance in texts across grade levels and text categories: word concreteness, syntactic simplicity, referential cohesion, causal cohesion, and narrativity. They consider the importance of both quantitative and qualitative characteristics of texts for assigning the right text to the right student at the right time.
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    How do we go about selecting texts for individualized reading assistance? This sounds like a new way.
Wayne Holly

Animate Text with Wondersay - 254 views

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    Wondersay is a simple tool for creating animated text displays. The animated text displays you create with Wondersay can be embedded into a blog post or wiki page. To create an animated text display just type a few words then click the Wondersay This icon. If you don't like the display that is automatically generated you can customize the colors, fonts, and animation effects until you're satisfied with the display. See my animated text below.
Carol Ansel

The Daring Librarian: Wikipedia is not wicked! - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post - 70 views

  • Teaching Wikipedia in 5 Easy Steps: *Use it as background information *Use it for technology terms *Use it for current pop cultural literacy *Use it for the Keywords *Use it for the REFERENCES at the bottom of the page!
  • 4 ways to use Wikipedia (hint: never cite it) Teachers: Please stop prohibiting the use of Wikipedia 20 Little Known Ways to Use Wikipedia Study: Wikipedia as accurate as Encyclopedia Britannica Schiff, Stacy. “Know it all: Can Wikipedia conquer expertise?” The New Yorker, February 26, 2006 And: Yes students, there’s a world beyond Wikipedia **Several years ago, Nature magazine did a comparison of material available on Wikipedia and Brittanica and concluded that Brittanica was somewhat, but not overwhelmingly, more accurate than Wikipedia. Brittanica lodged a complaint, and here, you can see what it complained about as well as Nature’s response. Nature compared articles from both organizations on various topics and sent them to experts to review. Per article, the averages were: 2.92 mistakes per article for Britannica and 3.86 for Wikipedia. -0- Follow The Answer Sheet every day by bookmarking http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet. And for admissions advice, college news and links to campus papers, please check out our Higher Education page. Bookmark it! var entrycat = ' ' By Valerie Strauss  |  05:00 AM ET, 09/07/2011 .connect_widget .connect_widget_text .connect_widget_connected_text a {display:block;} #center {overflow:visible;} /*.override-width iframe {width:274px !important;}*/ Tumblr Reddit Stumbleupon Digg Delicious LinkedIn http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.html#_=1315504289567&count=horizontal&counturl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fblogs%2Fanswer-sheet%2Fpost%2F
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    Excellent perspective on "The 'W' Word" - use it wisely for what it is - high school and college kids shouldn't be citing any general knowledge encyclopedias for serious research - but that doesn't mean there aren't some excellent uses for it.
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