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amy musone

What's on your refrigerator? | Connected Principals - 36 views

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    What's on your refrigerator? Way to collect what's important to people...shared vision, everyone has a voice
Jennifer Judkins

K12 Online Conference - 4 views

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    Free, online PD
Beth Panitz

Think Classroom Channel - 90 views

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    Source for interactive tools and media, lessons, MD State Curriculum
Beth Panitz

Free PD Resources for Teachers: Teacher Professional Development Sourcebook Directory - 78 views

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    Teacher Professional Development Directory can help you identify accredited programs, supplemental materials, software, workshops, and more.
Dimitris Tzouris

Bringing the Learning to you: Virtual Professional Development Communities by Hazel Owe... - 64 views

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    Interesting prezi presented at the 2010 Global Education Conference
A Gardner

Classroom 2.0 LIVE! - Archive and Resources - 141 views

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    Incredible number of maths resources. Thanks Mr Dan Meyer.
Miss OConnor

Personal Learning Networks for Educators - The Educator's PLN - 67 views

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    understanding the importance of building a PLN
Daryl Bambic

Be the Change. Listen. Follow-up » Edurati Review - 42 views

  • 1. Be the change. Leaders of professional development seem to forget that they’re actually teaching, and that part of teaching is modeling the activity you hope to see adopted. A session devoted to equipping teachers to implement more collaborative learning that is presented via “death by PowerPoint” is an oxymoron, a term originating from a Greek word appropriately meaning “pointedly foolish.” As one teacher recently expressed it, “Why does the worst teaching often happen in sessions on how to improve teaching?” Why, indeed? Modeling is a powerful teaching technique. In addition to communicating that the suggested new approach promotes learning, demonstration taps into some of the brain’s natural learning systems: This may be because demonstration actually encourages the brain to engage. Specialized neurons known as mirror neurons make practicing “in the head” possible…When a teacher repeatedly performs a sequence of steps, her students’ mirror neurons may enable their own preliminary practice of the same steps. In other words, as a teacher demonstrates a skill, students mentally rehearse it.1
  • Though we’ve been invited to lead professional development, we do not have all the answers. Professional development involves merging new research findings with current personnel—i.e., bringing ideas and people together. One way I’ve tried to do more of this recently is to ask teachers if any of them have tried something similar to a new approach I’ve explained. If any have, I invite them to share their experience. This invites elaboration, a critical cognitive process for constructing understanding. If the teacher’s experience was positive, we discuss why the approach was successful. If the teacher’s experience was frustrating, we often find together the reason for it and develop a plan for structuring it better the next time. This give-and-take values everyone, respects the experience present in the session, and allows the leader to be a colleague rather than an aloof expert.
  • 2. Listen. I have a tendency to get preoccupied with my preparation and forget that I’ll actually have people in the professional development session. Not just people but colleagues!
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  • 3. Follow up. I’ve written previously about the importance of coaching and the characteristics of an effective coach. A one-time information flood is ineffective, no matter how engaging the session’s leader may be. Teachers need support as they begin to implement new ideas, methods, and approaches. Note that support, not judgement, is needed. Showing up with an evaluation form is a certain way to kill any benefit professional development might yield. Teachers are learners, and we need the time and space to try, to reflect, to try again, to get helpful feedback, and to truly master implementation. We need the opportunity to learn. Coaching provides this opportunity, along with the encouragement and feedback necessary for success.
Beth Panitz

Learner.org - 103 views

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    Great videos to further understanding of subjects across the curriculum.
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    Annenberg Media has a new name. Free teacher professional development videos. Student interactives and resources across the curriculum. 
Lisa McCulloch

100 Free Online Lectures that Will Make You a Better Teacher | Best Universities - 7 views

  • Teachers learn from their experience, from their colleagues, from their students, and any number of other resources. If you are a teacher looking for ways to expand your knowledge base, here are 100 free lectures you can watch to help facilitate some of that learning.
  • Creative Learning Environments
  • Technology
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  • Technology
  • Information for New Teachers
  • Technology
  • Information for All Teachers
  • Teaching Specific Subjects
  • Special Needs
  • Arts
  • Arts
  • Physical Education and Health Education
  • Arts From film to music to the nature of creativity, watch these videos to learn about teaching the arts.
  • Lectures from Influential Professors
  • The following videos demonstrate ways to use technology in the classroom and offer tips, lessons, and information.
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    Great teachers know that learning doesn't stop as soon as you graduate from college. Teachers learn from their experience, from their colleagues, from their students, and any number of other resources. If you are a teacher looking for ways to expand your knowledge base, here are 100 free lectures you can watch to help facilitate some of that learning.
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