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Dennis OConnor

Views: Lessons of a Summer Teaching Online - Inside Higher Ed - 0 views

  • As I faithfully attended the monthly training meetings for Just in Time Technology (ex: how to use Skype) and for Course Design (ex: what is the conversion of 14 weeks pacing into a 30 day class), it began to dawn on me that I had underestimated the time and preparation required for my online course.
  • Reducing the amount of content does not mean reducing rigor for students or work for me. Like many others who have never taught online, I had entered this experience thinking that online courses were a little bit “fluffy.” I have a newfound respect for my fellow online professors.
  • Although I am a relative novice in the teaching arena, I appreciated the chance to revive my teaching mojo. I was forced to be creative about how to present course material and ensure that my students had a solid understanding of the information. I also realized I needed to revise my opinion of online teaching and those who participate in it. I now know that online courses are not a pale and lifeless version of traditional courses or worse, a “pay for an A” scam in which everyone teaches him/herself and everyone gets a good grade. Online courses can be distinctive and worthwhile ways of teaching in their own right. Amy Overman is assistant professor of psychology at Elon University.
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    Reviewed by Nancy Chapko: n her article, Lessons of a Summer Teaching Online, Dr. Amy Overman describes how she revived her "Teaching mojo" as a novice online instructor. An assistant professor of psychology at Elon University in North Carolina, Dr. Overman describes her personal experience as a first-time online instructor. Written for instructors who may have doubts about online Teaching and learning as she did, her account is both thoughtful and humorous. Dr. Overman describes her decision to teach an online class and her preparation for the experience. She relates her somewhat unexpected positive experience facilitating the class. She offers comparisons between her face-to-face and online Teaching experiences and draws some insightful conclusions. Among them is the realization that reducing the amount of content does not reduce the rigor of the course and online classes take a lot of time, but they're worth it. Whether you're a committed veteran of online Teaching, or you are at the initial stage of considering its merits, you will find Dr. Overman's article perceptive and thought-provoking. As she states, "… online courses are not a pale and lifeless version of traditional courses."
kabir mo

Innovative Teaching Method - ZIIEI - 0 views

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    Innovative teaching methods useful for teaching in classroom by the teachers to make the learning easier &engaging.
Berylaube 00

Main Page - TEFL World Wiki - 0 views

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    Acollaborative project with the aim of providing useful information for TEFL professionals." TEFL Teaching: This area is all about Teaching: how to teach and what to teach. And then how to make sure your students are learning! Included here are loads of activities and ideas for classroom control, discipline, techniques and so on Skills:How to teach the four skills in English: listening, reading, speaking and writing. Grammar Guide:=The TWW Grammar Guide is a comprehensive guide to English grammar written in a user-friendly manner for both learners and teachers.
kabir mo

Effective Teaching Methods Easy to Implement - ZIIEI - 0 views

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    Gone are the days when teaching was confined between books, blackboard, chalk and duster. Interactions were minimal between the teacher and students. However, the mode of imparting education has evolved over time and the teachers are embracing new & Effective teaching Methods. Experiential teaching is the keyword; therefore Government and the educationists across the world are emphasizing on adopting new Effective teaching Technique.
Tony Searl

NZ Interface Magazine | If you can't use technology get out of teaching! - 13 views

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    Is a lack of PD a barrier? Professional development is a barrier, although I think they can teach themselves much of what teachers need to be learning to be able to modernise their classrooms. The worst thing a teacher can say is: "who's going to teach me how to do that?" Teachers are teachers and should be able to teach themselves what they need to know. If they can't then they probably shouldn't be teaching. You want a teacher who can keep up. There are networks of other educators out there that can connect you with new skills. Professional development doesn't have to be something that is done to teachers - it can be just ongoing conversations they're having with other professionals that they're learning from every day.
kabir mo

Effective Teaching Ideas Easy to Implement - ZIIEI - 0 views

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    Effective teaching ideas allow the teacher to use the teaching methods to teach the students in the class to make the learning easier & engaging students in the classroom.
kabir mo

Best Innovative Teaching Practices For Education - 1 views

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    Every teacher has to face some challenges, that his students able to understand his teaching how much & how quickly they get it. Different teaching methods are used by the teachers in the classroom to teach the students. It is very necessary to use the Innovative teaching Strategy to teach the children. So we will discuss in this blog on Innovative teaching with different strategies.
Dennis OConnor

E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it - 53 views

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    Hi impact, curated magazine of articles and professional resources for those interested in e-learning and online teaching. Published by Dennis O'Connor, Program Advisor for the University of Wisconsin Stout E-Learning and Online teaching Graduate Certificate Program.
Marc Lijour

Go Ahead, Mess With Texas Instruments - Phil Nichols - The Atlantic - 5 views

  • Though many devices enter our classrooms for different reasons -- they are not neutral. Some are used to reinforce the authority of formal teaching; some engage students in the process of imaginative discovery. By balancing conventional and subversive academic possibilities, these latter objects show us the real potential of learning technologies. Not as sterile knowledge-delivery devices policed by authorized educators, but as boundary objects between endorsed educational utility and creative self-expression gone rogue.
  • Though many devices enter our classrooms for different reasons -- they are not neutral. Some are used to reinforce the authority of formal teaching; some engage students in the process of imaginative discovery. By balancing conventional and subversive academic possibilities, these latter objects show us the real potential of learning technologies. Not as sterile knowledge-delivery devices policed by authorized educators, but as boundary objects between endorsed educational utility and creative self-expression gone rogue.
  • Though many devices enter our classrooms for different reasons -- they are not neutral. Some are used to reinforce the authority of formal teaching; some engage students in the process of imaginative discovery. By balancing conventional and subversive academic possibilities, these latter objects show us the real potential of learning technologies. Not as sterile knowledge-delivery devices policed by authorized educators, but as boundary objects between endorsed educational utility and creative self-expression gone rogue.
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  • Though
  • Though many devices enter our classrooms for different reasons -- they are not neutral. Some are used to reinforce the authority of formal teaching; some engage students in the process of imaginative discovery. By balancing conventional and subversive academic possibilities, these latter objects show us the real potential of learning technologies. Not as sterile knowledge-delivery devices policed by authorized educators, but as boundary objects between endorsed educational utility and creative self-expression gone rogue.
  • Though many devices enter our classrooms for different reasons -- they are not neutral. Some are used to reinforce the authority of formal teaching; some engage students in the process of imaginative discovery. By balancing conventional and subversive academic possibilities, these latter objects show us the real potential of learning technologies. Not as sterile knowledge-delivery devices policed by authorized educators, but as boundary objects between endorsed educational utility and creative self-expression gone rogue.
  • Much like skateboarders have an imaginative orientation that allows them to see textures and movement in the curvatures of everyday objects -- a park bench, a railing, an empty swimming pool -- programmers learn to see their immediate environment as a creative space, a source for inspiration and improvisation.
  • This is distinct from other popular educational technologies -- many of which are marketed as subversive tools to "disrupt" traditional notions of learning, but often end up preserving those aspects of schooling that are most in need of disruption. In recent decades, districts have spent millions of dollars equipping classrooms with TVs, computers, and Smartboards -- only to find that such devices are mostly used to aid formal teaching instead of facilitating student discovery.
  • writing code for an iPad is restricted to those who purchase an Apple developer account, create programs that align with Apple standards, and submit their finished products for Apple's approval prior to distribution.
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    "Though many devices enter our classrooms for different reasons -- they are not neutral. Some are used to reinforce the authority of formal teaching; some engage students in the process of imaginative discovery. By balancing conventional and subversive academic possibilities, these latter objects show us the real potential of learning technologies. Not as sterile knowledge-delivery devices policed by authorized educators, but as boundary objects between endorsed educational utility and creative self-expression gone rogue."
April H.

The 10K Hour Rule: Deliberate Practice leads to Expertise, and Teaching can trump Genetics | Computing Education Blog - 0 views

  • The first is that practice is not the same as deliberate practice
  • second is that the fallback position can’t be genetics/innate talent
  • Simply putting in 10,000 hours of practice in an activity does not guarantee expertise
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  • They tested a weak form of the “10,000 hour rule” (that it’s just “practice,” not “deliberate practice”) and found it wanting.
  • They cite two studies that show that identical twins seem to have similar music and drawing talent compared to fraternal twins.
  • To start counting hours-towards-expertise anything later than birth is discounting the impact of learning in the pre-school years on up.
  • Hours spent in practice with a good teacher are going to contribute more to expertise than hours spent without a teacher.
  • We should be thinking about how we can teach in order to develop expertise.
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    "The Slate authors and Macnamara et al. dismiss the 10K hour rule too lightly, and their explanation of genetic/innate basis for expertise is too simple.  Practice is not the same as deliberate practice, or practice with a teacher. Expertise is learned, and we start learning at birth with expertise developing sometimes in ways not directly connected to the later activity. The important part is that we are able to learn to overcome some genetic/innate disparities with good teaching. We shouldn't be giving up on developing expertise because we don't have the genes. We should be thinking about how we can teach in order to develop expertise."
kabir mo

ZIIEI - INNOVATIVE PATHSHAALA- APP FOR TEACHERS - 0 views

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    ZIIEI Innovative Pathshaala App is designed to encourage and promote an experiential learning environment in the classroom. This platform serves as an everyday classroom companion to the teachers who can refer to the innovative ways of teaching different lessons through these zero-investment ideas. IP App is a digital leap of Innovative Pathshaala that is a series of books serving as a readymade teaching tool for all the teachers. This free learning App is a one-stop junction for subject-specific teaching tools mapped with all educational boards like C.B.S.E, I.C.S.E, Uttar Pradesh Board, Bihar Board, MP Board and many more. Teachers have access to innovative and experiential learning concepts, based on the existing school curriculum, applicable to any grade, multi-grade, and inclusive classrooms. The zero investment teaching tools available on this educational app can be of great help to govt. school teachers, private school teachers, tutors and to all kinds of educationists.
Carlos Quintero

Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
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  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of Teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of Teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
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    About pedagogic 2.0
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    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
Jeff Johnson

Become Better at Teaching with Technology, Conquering One Tech Challenge a Month for a Year - 0 views

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    The whole idea of the challenge has sparked my imagination about creating a challenge for teachers. I think teachers might be intrigued by the idea that they can become better at teaching with technology in "X" simple steps. The challenge might take on the title: Become Better at teaching with Technology, Conquering One Tech Challenge a Month for a Year.
Sheri Edwards

Cell phones in education - 53 views

Another free resource that will have your kids texting away on their phones is PollEverywhere. I put a link in my tiny (so far) list of bookmarks. I have used Polleverywhere a few times in class ...

technology teaching cell phones

Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - The role of teachers in Education 3.0 - 0 views

  • Download-style education fails when we try to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to lead in a future that is very different from what exists today –and, in a future that defies human imagination.
  • Teaching in Education 3.0 requires a new form of co-constructivism that provides meaningful extensions to Dewey, Vygotsky and Freire, while building the future.
  • Specifically, teaching in Education 3.0 necessitates a Leapfrog approach with: Adults who are eager to imagine, create and innovate with kids Kids and adults who want to learn more about each other Kids and adults who partner to collaborate in teaching to and learning from each other Kids who work at creative tasks that mirror the innovation workforce An understanding that kids need to contribute to all economic levels, and with better distribution of effort than in the past
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  • The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0? ShareThis
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    The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0?
anonymous

July 2 - "Teaching and Learning Weekly" is out | Studying Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it - 0 views

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    An online newspaper that collects together the week's news relating to teaching and learning - particularly for those interested in finding resources and inspirational stories about education.  Read and subscribe free at: http://paper.li/f-1328546324
Roland Gesthuizen

The Trouble With Online Education - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • Internet learning promises to make intellectual life more sterile and abstract than it already is — and also, for teachers and for students alike, far more lonely
  • The Internet teacher, even one who responds to students via e-mail, can never have the immediacy of contact that the teacher on the scene can, with his sensitivity to unspoken moods and enthusiasms.
  • I think that the best of those lecturers are highly adept at reading their audiences. They use practical means to do this — tests and quizzes, papers and evaluations. But they also deploy something tantamount to artistry. They are superb at sensing the mood of a room. They have a sort of pedagogical sixth sense. They feel it when the class is engaged and when it slips off. And they do something about it.
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  • With every class we teach, we need to learn who the people in front of us are. We need to know where they are intellectually, who they are as people and what we can do to help them grow. Teaching, even when you have a group of a hundred students on hand, is a matter of dialogue.
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    "With every class we teach, we need to learn who the people in front of us are. We need to know where they are intellectually, who they are as people and what we can do to help them grow. Teaching, even when you have a group of a hundred students on hand, is a matter of dialogue. "
Paul Beaufait

Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning - 55 views

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    "It is crucial to recognize that inquiry-based teaching should not be viewed as a technique or instructional practice or method used to teach a subject. Rather, inquiry starts with teachers as engaged learners and researchers with the foundational belief that the topics they teach are rich, living and generous places for wonder and exploration." (para. 4, retrieved 2012.11.23)
Nigel Coutts

Teaching Dispositions for Learning - The Learner's Way - 5 views

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    Increasingly we aim to teach dispositions but some care in the use of the term is required as it is easily oversimplified. While teaching for dispositions is encouraged it will have little effect if it means doing little other than engaging with the terminology. If we are to encourage the expansion of the desired dispositions, we must be sure to adequately unpack them and understand the implications in store for our culture of learning. 
Dorothy Hastings

Independence Day: Teach Your Kids the True Value of 4th July - 0 views

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    Teach your kids about the true meaning of why we celebrate every year Independence Day. Learn how to teach your children about the importance of July4.
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