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Nigel Coutts

A culture of innovation requires trust and resilience - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    Two quotes by Albert Einstein point to the importance of creating a culture within our schools (and organisations) that encourages experimentation, innovation, tinkering and indeed failure. If we are serious about embracing change, exploring new approaches, maximising the possibilities of new technologies, applying lessons from new research and truly seek to prepare our students for a new work order, we must become organisations that encourage learning from failure
Nigel Coutts

Culture, Change and the Individual - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    A recent post by George Couros (author of The innovators Mindset) posed an interesting question about the role that culture plays in shaping the trajectory of an organisation. The traditional wisdom is that culture trumps all but George points to the role that individuals play in shaping and changing culture itself. Is culture perhaps less resilient than we are led to imagine and is it just a consequence of the individuals with the greatest influence? Or, is something else at play here?
Nigel Coutts

Banishing The Culture of Busyness - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    At the start of each year we arrive back from our break hopefully rested and energised. The new year brings many new opportunities including new students, new team members and new teaching programmes. We begin again the climb up the hill with a fresh group of learners arriving at our doors full of excitement who will rely on us to meet their learning needs in the year ahead. All of this means we are at risk of starting the year with a certain level of panic. There is so much to do, our students are not accustomed to our routines, we don't know each other well, there are parents to meet, assessments to be done and before we know it we are back to being busy. 
Nigel Coutts

Learning vs Work in a Culture of Thinking - The Learner's Way - 10 views

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    Earlier this year a group of teachers I work with explored the 'Eight Cultural Forces' identified by Ron Ritchhart of Harvard's Project Zero. In doing so we decided to focus on our use of the term learning instead of the word work. Our goal was to bring our language choices into the spotlight and explore how a more deliberate focus on learning might alter the culture of our classrooms. Two terms later this focus persists and it is worth reflecting on the effect that this has had.
Nigel Coutts

Change, culture and Cultural Change in Education - The Learner's Way - 6 views

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     Embedded in the very weave of the organisation, culture is the most difficult aspect of an organisation to change and the hardest form of change to sustain 'That's because transforming a culture requires influencing people's deepest beliefs and most habitual behaviours' (Rogers, Meehan & Tanne 2006 p5). Rogers et al indicate that as little as 10% of all organisations that set out to develop a high performing culture achieve their goal.
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    Agreed. Education is controlled by the academics since it became a savior for leaving the middle class. Our best civic leaders have a different idea.
    http://www.textbooksfree.org/Leaders%20Educational%20Advise.htm
Steve Ransom

Peter T. Coleman, PhD: The Consequences of Our Games - 2 views

  • "At a time when games are becoming ever more realistic, reality is becoming more gamelike."
  • The problem is not that games are inconsistent with many aspects of our lives; it is that they provide a limited and skewed lens on the world
  • Seeing more and more aspects of our lives as games to win through maximization has a sort of self-perpetuating effect with perverse consequences, not the least of which is the impairment of what Diesing terms social rationality; the cherishing of unique relationships, personal connectedness, cooperative functioning, solidarity and sentiment.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • It stresses the strategic interdependent interests of humans and assumes that in games there is always a rational choice which is the best counter-choice to your opponent's.
  • If winning efficiently is the goal, then the rules (ethical, moral, legal, and spiritual), are essentially obstacles to game.
  • In our schools, competition for access to elite preschools, for grades, for social status, in sports, over positions of leadership, and for admission to exclusive colleges transforms one of our most basic institutions for fostering community, ethics and learning into competitive, individualistic corporate training-grounds. In these settings, the importance of competitive sports becomes paramount, for both financial and training purposes, and the artistry of cheating (see this year's Stuyvesant High School cheating scandal) and rule-bending (see Joe Paterno) revered. Such intense competition encourages the professionalization of parenting -- through tutors, highly-educated nannies, prep courses, and professional training camps (such as investment camps). You can imagine the deleterious effects these trends have on the ethos of care and moral responsibility in our families and schools, a critical buffer against bullying and violence in the lives of our children.
  • We become hyper-connected through technologies, boasting our number of "friends" on Facebook, and have less and less intimacy.
  • We choose friends with benefits or Internet porn over romantic relationships as they are less messy, more efficient.
  • Life is a race and we are losing.
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    A great piece worth the time to reflect on. Mindfulness needs to be practiced frequently.
Teresa Ilgunas

Seriously Amazing | Smithsonian - 60 views

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    Really interesting site !!
Suzanne Neuman

Lesson Plans - Search Education - Google - 45 views

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    The Google Search Education site includes "a series of lessons to help you guide your students to use search meaningfully in their schoolwork and beyond" (Lesson Plans, ¶ 1), plus A Google a Day Challenges in four categories: Culture, Geography, History, and Science. It also provides access to live and recorded training sessions.
Tero Toivanen

Fill Your New Kindle, iPad, iPhone with Free eBooks, Movies, Audio Books, Courses & Mor... - 107 views

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    You want to earn a big extra income? Be one of our Agents now on Studybooking.com. Registration is FREE you only need to share our website link in any social websites. For more details visit our website www.studybooking.com and contact us to info@studybooking.com
Steve Ransom

YouTube - SXSW 2010: Program or be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age - 19 views

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    "If you are not a programmer, you are one of the programmed." ...

    "If we don't create a society that at least knows there's a thing called programming, then we will end up being... not the programmers, but the users... and worse... the used."
Teresa Ilgunas

Word Spy - 37 views

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    "The Word Lover's Guide to New Words"
Kathleen N

The 100 Most Iconic Internet Videos [Full List] - - 0 views

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    per http://educationaltechnology.ca/couros/1448\nThis list of "The 100 Most Iconic Internet Videos" is useful that it gives the general context for each of these viral videos, and gives some insight into how they became so popular
Ruth Howard

mediatedcultures.net @ kansas state university - 0 views

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    beautiful comparative presentation by mwesch on digital information gathering filing use sorting etc
Ruth Howard

Digital Ethnography » Blog Archive » Toward a New Future of "Whatever" - 0 views

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    A brief history of "whatever" fab!
Dennis OConnor

Digital Ethnography - 0 views

  • a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.
  • Almost 9 months ago, the College of Wooster president, Grant Cornwell, forwarded my video to a remarkable collection of people who were daring and creative enough to think they could dance it … not just dance to it … but truly dance it.
  • This little smartpen from livescribe just might revolutionize my note-taking in seminars, discussions, and ethnographic interviews.  If you have never seen it before, check out some of the demos on YouTube.  In short, it records audio as you write and links what you are writing to the audio (by recording what you write through a small infrared camera near the tip of the pen).  When you are done recording you can actually tap the pen anywhere on your page and the pen will play the audio that was recorded at the time you were making that specific pen stroke. 
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    Best know for the great viral video the Web is using us, Michael Wesch is exploring web 2.0 as only an anthropologist could. Fascinating work. Interesting mind!
Jeff Johnson

Testing the pencil - Newspaper Tree El Paso - 0 views

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    It is hard to reconcile what Bauerlien says (Educational technology has little or no effect on learning because no-one is using it properly) with what I know instinctively happens (Kids get excited about learning when technology is added to the mix.)
J Black

Teenagers' Internet Socializing Not a Bad Thing - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    Good news for worried parents: All those hours their teenagers spend socializing on the Internet are not a bad thing, according to a new study by the MacArthur Foundation.
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