Skip to main content

Home/ ETAP640/ Group items tagged questioning

Rss Feed Group items tagged

sherrilattimer

FILLING THE TOOL BOX - 0 views

  • If on the other hand, they are used to information questions, they may ask, "Which states joined the Confederacy? What were the six main causes of the war? What happened at Shiloh? Who was the Union commander at Shiloh? When did the war end?"
  • If you ask many tantalizing and divergent questions in your classroom, your students are likely to model after your behavior for example, "What would have happened if Lincoln was shot in the first month of the war? Why did Lincoln only free the slaves in the rebel states? How did it feel to be a woman in the path of Sherman's army?"
  • The four rules of brainstorming: 1. all contributions are accepted without judgment; 2. the goal is a large number of ideas or questions; 3. building on other people's ideas is encouraged; 4. farout, unusual ideas are encouraged.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • And why do we bother with a time-consuming activity like developing a typology of questions? Because once students have the labels, you can lead them to practice each type of question thoughtfully. You can show a film and ask each student to think of three "why?" questions to share with the class at its conclusion. You may assign a story to read and ask for three "inference" questions. Suddenly the students can reach into their questioning tool box and carefully select the saw for sawing and the plane for planing.
  • When questions are nurtured, admitting a lack of knowledge is rewarded. It is the first step in learning and problem-solving
  • Unlike answers, questions carry little risk because the activity has made it acceptable to identify what it is that you do not know.
  • Some questions deserve 10 seconds of thought. Others require days or even months. Great questions span centuries of human civilization (i.e., "why are we here?" "How do we know?" "Can we know?" "How can we know if we know?").
  • The more typical classroom activity involves concealing what it is that you do not know.
  • Research into wait-time for American classrooms paints a distressing picture. Many teachers wait less than two seconds for the answer to each question and ask hundreds of questions per hour. These types of questions are generally recall questions demanding little thought.
  • Unlike many textbook publishers, reporters like to ask questions that flow from or stimulate curiosity, because unlike schools, televisions do not have captive audiences. A reporter will ask the victim how he or she is feeling, the rock star why he or she used drugs and the politician why he or she betrayed his or her constituents. Sometimes we are offended by the boundary lines of decency that curiosity compels these people to cross, so a recent rock song portrayed the phenomenon as "We love dirty laundry." We should expect considerably more sensitivity from our students, yet the model can work powerfully for us as we explore the issues surrounding any human event being studied in a classroom.
  •  
    Classroom strategies to engender student questioning.
Alena Rodick

A Framework for Designing Questions for Online Learning - 0 views

  • At least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • t least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • At least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • At least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • Discussion is widely used because it can promote several types of thinking-and certain types of thinking especially those characterized as constructivist, are important in education.
  • Questioning is a significant instructional design element for the promotion of effective discussion. This article describes a theoretical framework for designing questions for starting online discussion and follow-up questions to maintain the discussion.
  •  
    "The discussion method is one of the most commonly used pedagogical techniques in the online classroom. Discussion is widely used because it can promote several types of thinking-and certain types of thinking especially those characterized as constructivist, are important in education. Proper attention to the design, facilitation, and maintenance of an online instructional discussion is critical to promote students' constructive thinking. Questioning is a significant instructional design element for the promotion of effective discussion. This article describes a theoretical framework for designing questions for starting online discussion and follow-up questions to maintain the discussion. This framework is placed within a broader context of discussion within a constructivist, online environment. Numerous examples of discussion questions which were gathered from experienced online instructors are presented with the goal of preparing students and teachers to participate effectively in online discussions."
Gary Bedenharn

Classroom questioning for trainee teachers - 0 views

  •  
    Reasons and recommendations on questioning in the classroom.
George Dale

Discussion Prompts - Pedagogical Repository - 2 views

  • Effective online discussion prompts provide a frame of reference through an associated shared experience or learning activity, but there are numerous creative ways in which this context can be brought to bear.
  •  
    Various types of discussion prompts are discussed.
  •  
    Great *short* discussion of discussions (are we getting meta yet?) with specific examples of prompts and direction. Also nice reference list.
Joan McCabe

The Role of Socratic Questioning in Thinking, Teaching, and Learning - 0 views

  •  
    I think this is more of the article we had to read for class, but I am citing it here as there is more to it that I want to use. Describes how questions are the driving force of thought. Also describes the Socratic method in depth.
sschwartz03

The Role of Questions in Teaching, Thinking and Le - 0 views

  • If we want thinking we must stimulate it with questions that lead students to further questions. We must overcome what previous schooling has done to the thinking of students. We must resuscitate minds that are largely dead when we receive them. We must give our students what might be called "artificial cogitation" (the intellectual equivalent of artificial respiration).
    • Luke Fellows
       
      Arts teach student's to ask questions, not provide answers. Like in Improv - "Yes, and..." this agrees a concept and adds to the narrative. Never negate. Like and answer. "Why?" Game. Superficial question that digs for deeper answers.
  • Thinking is not driven by answers but by question
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • This demonstrates that most of the time they are not thinking through the content they are presumed to be learning. This demonstrates that most of the time they are not learning the content they are presumed to be learning.
  • only students who have questions are really thinking and learning
  • all statements that this or that is so — are implicit answers to questions
  • Answers on the other hand, often signal a full stop in thought
  •  
    How deep questions drive thought. Statements are contrived originally by answering questions.
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    So, how do we provide "artificial cogitation"?
  •  
    Need to ask questions to be able to think and then comes the learning.
  •  
    "Thinking is driven by questions"
Catherine Strattner

EQM0048.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

  •  
    Great resource regarding managing, facilitating, and participating in online discussion.
Fiona Grady

Formative Assessment Techniques - 0 views

  •  
    Features Paul Black. I think this is a great video that vividly depicts ways instructors can change the way they interact with pupils to enhance student outcomes.
Donna Angley

Foster Critical Thinking Using the Socratic Method - 0 views

  •  
    The article summarizes a talk given by Political Science professor Rob Reich, on May 22, 2003, as part of the center's Award Winning Teachers on Teaching lecture series. Reich, the recipient of the 2001 Walter J. Gores Award for Teaching Excellence, describes four essential components of the Socratic method and urges his audience to "creatively reclaim [the method]
Diane Gusa

Teaching Creativity - 0 views

  • Most five year olds are totally confident that they can draw, sing, and dance.  Tragically, within three or four years this child, if she is typical, will experience a crisis of confidence
  • She will no longer feel competent or creative. 
  • When allowed to do what we want to do, we are most likely to revert to whatever we previously found enjoyable and/or successful.
    • Diane Gusa
       
      I have experienced this with my students, but now I also understand that they need more confidence to be risk-takers
  • ...11 more annotations...
  •   In order to force a new idea to the surface, an artist might reverse the order of work, change the medium, change the scale, forbid a certain common component in the work, and so on.  These are limitations to jog or jump start the creative impulse.
  • In creative teaching, assignment limitations provide a way to change the student's habits of work
  • people have developed problem solving habits that lack confidence in their own ability to bring any life experience or judgement to the situation.
  • a society that values conformity above indiviual creativity and choice making probably should teach drawing as a series of prescribed symbols rather than teaching actual observation, thinking, feeling, and interpretation skills.
  • Teach creativity by giving TIME FOR THE CREATIVE PROCESS Assign HOMEWORK OF THE MIND
  • When we show an end product in order to help explain something, we risk that students will not be challenged to think creatively
  • To teach process, we avoid posting charts that gives answer unless the students themselves have invented the charts.
  •   The scientific method says that questions must be answered experimentally and the results are repeatable.
  • the scientific method takes more time in the short run, but if a student learns that they can design experiments to solve their own problems, they have learned not only the scientific method, they have learned one of the important components of artistic thinking and artistic behavior. Ultimately, time is saved because students have learned to figure out how to answer their own questions. They are empowered.
  • True creativity happens when intuitive imagination brings forth the previously unknown and unimagined
  • The creative process includes preparation, incubation, insight, elaboration, and evaluation.
Donna Angley

The Six Types of Socratic Questions - 0 views

  •  
    Critical thinking is the process we use to reflect on, access and judge the assumptions underlying our own and others ideas and actions. Socratic questioning is at the heart of critical thinking and a number of homework problems draw from R.W. Paul's six types of Socratic questions:
Melissa Pietricola

DoingCL - Guided Reciprocal Peer Questioning - 0 views

  •  
    Peer Questioning and how to provide guided questions.
Diane Gusa

Socratic questioning - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

  • When teachers use Socratic questioning in teaching, their purpose may be to probe student thinking, to determine the extent of student knowledge on a given topic, issue or subject, to model Socratic questioning for students, or to help students analyze a concept or line of reasoning.
  • To deeply probe student thinking, to help students begin to distinguish what they know or understand from what they do not know or understand
  • To foster students' abilities to ask Socratic questions
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Socrates himself thought that questioning was the only defensible form of teaching
Donna Angley

The Role of Socratic Questioning... - 0 views

  • Respond to all answers with a further question (that calls upon the respondent to develop his/her thinking in a fuller and deeper way)
  • Treat all thoughts as in need of development
  • Recognize that any thought can only exist fully in a network of connected thoughts. Stimulate students — through your questions — to pursue those connections
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • Recognize that all thought reflects an agenda. Assume that you do not fully understand the thought until you understand the agenda behind it. (What are you trying to accomplish in saying this? What is your central aim in this line of thought?)
  • Recognize that all thoughts presuppose an information base. Assume that you do not fully understand the thought until you understand the background information that supports or informs it. (What information are you basing that comment on? What experience convinced you of this? How do we know this information is accurate?)
  • Recognize that all thought takes place within a point of view or frame of reference. Assume that you do not fully understand a thought until you understand the point of view or frame of reference which places it on an intellectual map. (From what point of view are you looking at this? Is there another point of view we should consider?)
  •  
    SOcratic Method Ideas Recognize that all thought reflects an agenda. Assume that you do not fully understand the thought until you understand the agenda behind it. (What are you trying to accomplish in saying this? What is your central aim in this line of thought?)
  •  
    One of the reasons that instructors tend to overemphasize "coverage" over "engaged thinking" is that they do not fully appreciate the role of questions in teaching content. Consequently, they assume that answers can be taught separate from questions.
Mary Huffman

Socratic Questioning - 0 views

  •  
    discussion tips
1 - 19 of 19
Showing 20 items per page