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Contents contributed and discussions participated by lkryder

lkryder

ISTE Standards Essential Conditions - 0 views

  • oactive leadership in developing a shared vision for educational technology among all education stakeholders, including teachers and support staff, school and district administrators, teacher educators, students, parents, and the community Empowered Leaders&nbsp; Stakeholders at every level empowered to be leaders&nbsp;in effecting change Implementation Planning A systemic plan aligned with a shared vision for school effectiveness and student learning through the infusion of information and communication technology (ICT) and digital learning resources &nbsp; Consistent and Adequate Funding Ongoing funding to support technology infrastructure, personnel, digital resources, and staff development Equitable Access Robust and reliable access to current and emerging technologies and digital resources, with connectivity for all students, teachers, staff, and school leaders Skilled Personnel Educators, support staff, and other leaders skilled in the selection and effective use of appropriate ICT resources Ongoing Professional Learning Technology-related professional learning plans and opportunities with dedicated time to practice and share ideas Technical Support&nbsp; Consistent and reliable assistance for maintaining,&nbsp; renewing, and using ICT and digital learning resources&nbsp; Curriculum Framework Content standards and related digital curriculum&nbsp; resources that are aligned with and support digital age&nbsp; learning and work&nbsp; Student-Centered Learning&nbsp;</h3
  • Proactive leadership in developing a shared vision for educational technology among all education stakeholders, including teachers and support staff, school and district administrators, teacher educators, students, parents, and the community
  • Shared Vision
lkryder

Socratic Smackdown pdf - 2 views

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    Game plan for student discussion
lkryder

OpenBadges.me - 0 views

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    a place to make badges - really easy and fun - download and put them in your course
lkryder

theoryoffun.pdf - 0 views

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    presentation based on Raph Koster's book Theory of Fun
lkryder

Gamasutra - Book Excerpt: 'A Theory Of Game Design' - What Games Aren't - 0 views

  • Game designer Marc LeBlanc has defined eight types of fun: sense-pleasure, make-believe, drama, obstacle, social framework, discovery, self-discovery and expression, and surrender. Paul Ekman, a researcher on emotions and facial expressions, has identified literally dozens of different emotions - it’s interesting to see how many of them only exist in one language but not in others. Nicole Lazzaro did some studies watching people play games, and she arrived at four clusters of emotion represented by the facial expressions of the players: hard fun, easy fun, altered states, and the people factor.
  • Games are not stories. It is interesting to make the comparison, though: Games tend to be experiential teaching. Stories teach vicariously. Games are good at objectification. Stories are good at empathy. Games tend to quantize, reduce, and classify. Stories tend to blur, deepen, and make subtle distinctions. Games are external - they are about people’s actions. Stories (good ones, anyway) are internal - they are about people’s emotions and thoughts. In both cases, when they are good, you can come back to them repeatedly and keep learning something new. But we never speak of fully mastering a good story.
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    games and stories
lkryder

Raph's Website - 0 views

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    Koster's work is considered important foundation for game design
lkryder

REAP > Theory & Practice > Conceptions - 0 views

  • In this website some key assumptions are made about assessment and feedback.&nbsp; In particular, the primary purpose of these processes is conceptualised as being to enable students to develop as self-regulated learners, able to monitor, evaluate and regulate their own learning. This does not mean a focus on individual learning. Rather, student self-regulation is more likely to be&nbsp;developed through collaboration amongst students rather than by individualistic approaches to learning.
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    engagement and empowerment through effective assessment redesign
lkryder

REAP - Resources > Assessment Principles: Some possible candidates - 0 views

  • Table 1: Principles of good formative assessment and feedback. Help clarify what good performance is (goals, criteria, standards). To what extent do students in your course have opportunities to engage actively with goals, criteria and standards, before, during and after an assessment task? Encourage ‘time and effort’ on challenging learning tasks. To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning? Deliver high quality feedback information that helps learners self-correct. What kind of teacher feedback do you provide – in what ways does it help students self-assess and self-correct? Provide opportunities to act on feedback (to close any gap between current and desired performance) To what extent is feedback attended to and acted upon by students in your course, and if so, in what ways? Ensure that summative assessment has a positive impact on learning? To what extent are your summative and formative assessments aligned and support the development of valued qualities, skills and understanding. Encourage interaction and dialogue around learning (peer and teacher-student. What opportunities are there for feedback dialogue (peer and/or tutor-student) around assessment tasks in your course? Facilitate the development of self-assessment and reflection in learning. To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-assessment or peer assessment in your course? Give choice in the topic, method, criteria, weighting or timing of assessments. To what extent do students have choice in the topics, methods, criteria, weighting and/or timing of learning and assessment tasks in your course? Involve students in decision-making about assessment policy and practice. To what extent are your students in your course kept informed or engaged in consultations regarding assessment decisions? Support the development of learning communities To what extent do your assessments and feedback processes help support the development of learning communities? Encourage positive motivational beliefs and self-esteem. To what extent do your assessments and feedback processes activate your students’ motivation to learn and be successful? Provide information to teachers that can be used to help shape the teaching To what extent do your assessments and feedback processes inform and shape your teaching?
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    a web resource with the REAP material in the JISC pdf for easier bookmarking
lkryder

IEEE Xplore Abstract - Empirical Study on the Effect of Achievement Badges in TRAKLA2 O... - 0 views

  • encourage desired study practices.
    • lkryder
       
      This aligns with how I want to use them
lkryder

Usable Knowledge: What is Teaching for Understanding? - 0 views

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    The TfU model nicely compliments CATs and UbD - I personally use a hybrid version of all three and I see many similar ideas in our readings for this class from JISC
lkryder

Wiggins, Grant P.? Assessing Student Performance - 0 views

  • All students are entitled to the following:
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    Assessment Bill of Rights - wiggins - excerpted
lkryder

Gamasutra - Playing Games Is Hard Work: An Excerpt From Reality Is Broken - 0 views

  • Games make us happy because they are hard work that we choose for ourselves, and it turns out that almost nothing makes us happier than good, hard work
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    games as hard fun
lkryder

Making Matters! How the Maker Movement Is Transforming Education - WeAreTeachers - 0 views

  • The tools and ethos of the Maker revolution offer insight and hope for schools. The breadth of options and the “can-do” attitude espoused by the movement is exactly what students need, especially girls who tend to opt out of science and math in middle and high school. However, hands-on Making is not just a good idea for young women. All students need challenge and “hard fun” that inspires them to dig deeper and construct big ideas. Making science hands-on and interesting is not pandering to young sensibilities; it honors the learning drive and spirit that is all too often crushed by endless worksheets and vocabulary drills. Making is a way of bringing engineering to young learners. Such concrete experiences provide a meaningful context for understanding the abstract science and math concepts traditionally taught by schools while expanding the world of knowledge now accessible to students for the first time.
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    Maker movement a good example of students' need and desire to learn by doing
lkryder

The Artist's Toolkit - 0 views

  • The site is interactive, annimated, and allows users to create works based on the tools that they've learned about.
    • lkryder
       
      I will use this to help students understand the vocabulary of formal aspects of art works. This is designed for kids but it is fun to use and the animations are actually overlaying real works of art. Exactly the deconstruction of what we will be doing in class all semester. I think it helps make the connection better than a simple text explanation from me.
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    I bookmarked this a while back in diigo but might not have used the merlot entry address, but instead bookmarked the actual tool itself in loco
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    I bookmarked this a while back in diigo but might not have used the merlot entry address, but instead bookmarked the actual tool itself in loco
lkryder

How to Design Your Online Course - YouTube - 1 views

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    An excellent example of an adaptation of the Understanding by Design backward design process ( although not stated as such) with a healthy dose of Quality Matters alignment between assessment and objectives.
lkryder

Consider the Source II - 0 views

shared by lkryder on 24 Jul 14 - No Cached
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