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lkryder

REAP - Resources > Assessment Principles: Some possible candidates - 0 views

  • Table 1: Principles of good formative assessment and feedback.


    1. Help clarify what good performance is (goals, criteria, standards).
      To what extent do students in your course have opportunities to engage actively with goals, criteria and standards, before, during and after an assessment task?
    2. Encourage ‘time and effort’ on challenging learning tasks.
      To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning?
    3. Deliver high quality feedback information that helps learners self-correct.
      What kind of teacher feedback do you provide – in what ways does it help students self-assess and self-correct?
    4. Provide opportunities to act on feedback (to close any gap between current and desired performance)
      To what extent is feedback attended to and acted upon by students in your course, and if so, in what ways?
    5. Ensure that summative assessment has a positive impact on learning?
      To what extent are your summative and formative assessments aligned and support the development of valued qualities, skills and understanding.
    6. Encourage interaction and dialogue around learning (peer and teacher-student.
      What opportunities are there for feedback dialogue (peer and/or tutor-student) around assessment tasks in your course?
    7. Facilitate the development of self-assessment and reflection in learning.
      To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-asse
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    a web resource with the REAP material in the JISC pdf for easier bookmarking
lkryder

Usable Knowledge: What is Teaching for Understanding? - 0 views

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    The TfU model nicely compliments CATs and UbD - I personally use a hybrid version of all three and I see many similar ideas in our readings for this class from JISC
lkryder

Gamasutra - Playing Games Is Hard Work: An Excerpt From Reality Is Broken - 0 views

  • Games make us happy because they are hard work that we choose for ourselves, and it turns out that almost nothing makes us happier than good, hard work
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    games as hard fun
Alicia Fernandez

Pearson Research Network - School of Thought Videos - 0 views

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    Vision of the future that integrates technology, neuroscience, and educational psychology into everyday life to make anytime, anywhere learning possible. These videos demonstrate how innovative connections among technology, content, and life beyond formal schooling can change how we think of learning.
cpcampbell88

Real Connections: Making Distance Learning Accessible to Everyone - 0 views

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    Different ways students with specific disabilities can access the course
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    Different ways students with specific disabilities can access the course
Jessica M

How People Learn - 1 views

    • Jessica M
       
      "The romanticized view of technology is that its mere presence in schools will enhance student learning and achievement"
    • Jessica M
       
      "Technologies do not guarantee effective learning, however"
    • Alicia Fernandez
       
      "The transfer literature suggests that the most effective transfer may come from a balance of specific examples and general principles, not from either one alone"
    • Jessica M
       
      "it is now easier to create environments in which students can learn by doing, receive feedback, and continually refine their understanding and build new knowledge"
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    • Jessica M
       
      "These technologies also provide access to a vast array of information, including digital libraries, data for analysis, and other people who provide information, feedback, and inspiration." 
lkryder

Individual and Social Aspects of Learning - 1 views

  • The cognitive transformations triggered by tools have two sides, paralleling the kinds of effects discussed above. One side is learning effects with the tool. This recognizes the changed functioning and expanded capability that takes place as the user uses and gets used to particular tools. Impact occurs through the redistribution of a task‰s cognitive load between persons and devices (e.g. Pea, 1993; Perkins, 1993), including symbol-handling devices (e.g,. a spell checker) or across persons, mediated by devices and symbol systems (telephones, fax machines). As these examples suggest, such tools are all around us, but their possibility also invites the design of special-purpose tools for supporting various cognitive functions. For instance, experiments have shown that a computerized Reading Partner that provides ongoing metacognitive-like guidance improves students‰ comprehension of texts while they read with the tool (Salomon, Globerson, & Guterman, 1991).
  • Social Mediation by Cultural Artifacts
  • The role of tools and symbol systems as both reflecting and affecting the human psyche has long been recognized. But it is mainly due to the Russian sociocultural tradition of Vygotsky (e.g., 1978), Luria (1981), and Leont‰ev (1981), and their Western interpreters (e.g,. Cole & Wertch, 1996), that scholarly attention has focused on tools as social mediators of learning. Here we use ‹toolsŠ in a broad sense, including not only physical implements but technical procedures like the algorithms of arithmetic and symbolic resources such as those of natural languages and mathematical and musical notation.
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  • implements of information-handling,
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    dated but still very interesting and relevant article about what "social learning is"
dkiesel

Learning from Our Teaching Mistakes | Faculty Focus - 0 views

  • I hold in particularly high esteem those faculty members not only willing to talk about teaching failures but also to publish articles about them
  • But you also can’t read them and be unimpressed by how much they learned through the analysis. Each one is an exemplar of the kind of critical reflection that fosters growth. This is reflection that makes us wise and wonderful teachers. And finally you also can’t read these articles and not realize how much there is for us to learn from one another’s mistakes. I’m definitely in favor of more articles like these, but there is one caveat. It might be better if they were published after you have tenure or a continuing contract.
kasey8876

Personal Learning Environments, social media, and self-regulated learning: A natural fo... - 1 views

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    A Personal Learning Environment or PLE is a potentially promising pedagogical approach for both integrating formal and informal learning using social media and supporting student self-regulated learning in higher education contexts.
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    Formal and informal learning, personal learning environments and social media
sherrilattimer

FILLING THE TOOL BOX - 0 views

  • If on the other hand, they are used to information questions, they may ask, "Which states joined the Confederacy? What were the six main causes of the war? What happened at Shiloh? Who was the Union commander at Shiloh? When did the war end?"
  • If you ask many tantalizing and divergent questions in your classroom, your students are likely to model after your behavior for example, "What would have happened if Lincoln was shot in the first month of the war? Why did Lincoln only free the slaves in the rebel states? How did it feel to be a woman in the path of Sherman's army?"
  • The four rules of brainstorming:

    1. all contributions are accepted without judgment;

    2. the goal is a large number of ideas or questions;

    3. building on other people's ideas is encouraged;

    4. farout, unusual ideas are encouraged.

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  • And why do we bother with a time-consuming activity like developing a typology of questions? Because once students have the labels, you can lead them to practice each type of question thoughtfully. You can show a film and ask each student to think of three "why?" questions to share with the class at its conclusion. You may assign a story to read and ask for three "inference" questions. Suddenly the students can reach into their questioning tool box and carefully select the saw for sawing and the plane for planing.
  • When questions are nurtured, admitting a lack of knowledge is rewarded. It is the first step in learning and problem-solving
  • Unlike answers, questions carry little risk because the activity has made it acceptable to identify what it is that you do not know.
  • Some questions deserve 10 seconds of thought. Others require days or even months. Great questions span centuries of human civilization (i.e., "why are we here?" "How do we know?" "Can we know?" "How can we know if we know?").
  • The more typical classroom activity involves concealing what it is that you do not know.
  • Research into wait-time for American classrooms paints a distressing picture. Many teachers wait less than two seconds for the answer to each question and ask hundreds of questions per hour. These types of questions are generally recall questions demanding little thought.
  • Unlike many textbook publishers, reporters like to ask questions that flow from or stimulate curiosity, because unlike schools, televisions do not have captive audiences. A reporter will ask the victim how he or she is feeling, the rock star why he or she used drugs and the politician why he or she betrayed his or her constituents. Sometimes we are offended by the boundary lines of decency that curiosity compels these people to cross, so a recent rock song portrayed the phenomenon as "We love dirty laundry." We should expect considerably more sensitivity from our students, yet the model can work powerfully for us as we explore the issues surrounding any human event being studied in a classroom.
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    Classroom strategies to engender student questioning.
lkryder

Johns Hopkins University School of Education Graphics and Learning - 0 views

  • It is of course important to organize one's ideas before formal writing, but I now believe that all students should have the choice of whether to do so in outline or in some graphic form.
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    visualizing ideas and types of visualization
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    visualizing ideas and types of visualization
Alena Rodick

A Framework for Designing Questions for Online Learning - 0 views

  • At least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • t least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • At least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
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  • At least four types of thinking are identified in the literature as being promoted by discussion: critical thinking, higher-order thinking, distributed thinking, and constructive thinking.
  • Discussion is widely used because it can promote several types of thinking-and certain types of thinking especially those characterized as constructivist, are important in education.
  • Questioning is a significant instructional design element for the promotion of effective discussion. This article describes a theoretical framework for designing questions for starting online discussion and follow-up questions to maintain the discussion.
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    "The discussion method is one of the most commonly used pedagogical techniques in the online classroom. Discussion is widely used because it can promote several types of thinking-and certain types of thinking especially those characterized as constructivist, are important in education. Proper attention to the design, facilitation, and maintenance of an online instructional discussion is critical to promote students' constructive thinking. Questioning is a significant instructional design element for the promotion of effective discussion. This article describes a theoretical framework for designing questions for starting online discussion and follow-up questions to maintain the discussion. This framework is placed within a broader context of discussion within a constructivist, online environment. Numerous examples of discussion questions which were gathered from experienced online instructors are presented with the goal of preparing students and teachers to participate effectively in online discussions."
lkryder

Adaptive Learning System - The Role of Adaptive Learning in Math - 0 views

  • Pedagogically and research-based intelligent adaptive learning technology accesses and stays in the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) for each learner. That means it provides the right next lesson at the right level of difficulty at the right time.

    When work is easy, learners can do the work on their own without any help. It’s in their "comfort zone." If all the work a learner is asked to do is always in the comfort zone, no real learning will take place and the learner will eventually lose interest. Conversely, when the work is too hard, the learner becomes frustrated and will likely give up.

    The area between the comfort zone and the frustration zone is the one where true learning will take place – the optimal learning zone. It’s the area where a learner will need some help or will need to work hard to understand a concept or complete a task.

    By keeping the challenge appropriate, the learner is guided to be a mathematical ‘doer’ — someone who thinks and strategizes in ways they can apply in school and in their real life experience. This is optimal teaching and optimal learning.

    • lkryder
       
      This has been my thinking all along on the gamefying and my weekly really hard quizzes. Now I hope to build on it.
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    This is a page offering a product BUT what I found fascinating was their use of ZPD as the learning opportunity in adaptive technologies. I recall as a child having programmed learning guides that I loved and I did them for hours ( I recall they were about logic and problem solving- very cool). They were printed in a book. Now that kind of thing is frowned upon as low on Bloom but all the publishers are creating these adaptive supplements and students love them.
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    This is a page offering a product BUT what I found fascinating was their use of ZPD as the learning opportunity in adaptive technologies. I recall as a child having programmed learning guides that I loved and I did them for hours ( I recall they were about logic and problem solving- very cool). They were printed in a book. Now that kind of thing is frowned upon as low on Bloom but all the publishers are creating these adaptive supplements and students love them.
abeukema

CTE - Using Effective Questions - 0 views

    • Put the question through the following filters:
    • Does this question draw out and work with pre-existing understandings that students bring with them?
    • Does this question raise the visibility of the key concepts the students are learning?
    • Will this question stimulate peer discussion?
    • Is it clear what the question is about?
kasey8876

Online group work patterns: How to promote a successful collaboration - 0 views

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    Collaborative learning processes are highly dependent on the shared written information and the interactions that are established among the participants.
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