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Alena Rodick

Emotional presence, learning, and the online learning environment | Cleveland-Innes | T... - 0 views

  • Those engaged in online learning deal with the effects of emotion on a daily basis, whether in designing instruction, teaching, or learning online. The work of Damasio and LeDoux independently suggests that emotion is neither an objective nor outcome of learning yet is central to cognition. The study of O’Regan (2003) showed that students express their emotions in relation to the various aspects of an online course such as design and organizational issues (i.e., a lack of clear instructions), cognitive issues (i.e., learning materials, success), social issues (during communicating), time management, or technology. Similarly, Cleveland-Innes, Garrison, and Kinsel (2007) also found out that students disclosed emotions in relation to the social, teaching, and cognitive presence in an online course.
  • Research results from multiple studies indicate that emotions are an integral part of the learning environment and influence students’ learning experiences (Cleveland-Innes & Campbell, 2006). According to Baumeister, DeWall, and Zhang (2007), emotions influence outcomes. That is, positive emotions lead to positive outcomes and negative emotions to negative outcomes.
  • Emotion may constrain learning as a distracter but, if managed, may serve as an enabler in support of thinking, decision making, stimulation, and directing. Online learning is replete, not fraught, with emotion. We conclude, with others, that emotion is present in online learning communities
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  • Given this reality, emotion must be considered, if not a central factor, at least as a ubiquitous, influential part of learning—online and otherwise (Plutchick, 2003; Stets & Turner, 2006; Wosnitza & Volet, 2005). Therefore, emotions expressed in the online experience, as explained by the CoI model (Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000), indicate that emotional presence exists in social, cognitive, and teaching presence.
  • ey to online environments is to acknowledge and discuss emotional tenor as much communicative information is lost without tone of voice and facial expressions— emoticons excepted. The exploration of emotional states that are not present— hidden yet influential—needs attention.
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    In spite of evidence that more and more students are engaging in online learning experiences, details about the transition for teachers and students to a new learning environment are still unconfirmed. While new technologies are often expected to make work easier, they also involve the development of new competencies. This change may, in itself, elicit an emotional response, and, more importantly, emotion may impact the experience of online learning. Knowledge about the impact of emotion on learning broadly is available, but not about emotion and online learning. This study presents evidence of emotions present in online environments, and empirical data which suggests emotional presence may exist as a fundamental element in an online community of inquiry.
Alena Rodick

BE VOCAL: Characteristics of Successful Online Instructors - 0 views

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    he VOCAL approach summarizes the key characteristics that a master instructor utilizes to be effective in an online environment. VOCAL is an acronym for Visible, Organized, Compassionate, Anal ytical and Leader-by-example.
sherrilattimer

ACVE - Teaching Adults: Is It Different? - 0 views

  • pedagogy assumes that the child learner is a dependent personality, has limited experience, is ready to learn based on age level, is oriented to learning a particular subject matter, and is motivated by external rewards and punishment (Guffey and Rampp 1997; Sipe 2001).
    • sherrilattimer
       
      Not everyone is the same at the same age, and they certainly don't have the same experience.
  • traditional teaching practices, not considered appropriate for adults, are suited to the needs of children and adolescents
  • The ongoing debates—andragogy vs. pedagogy, teacher directed vs. learner centered—may mean that no single theory explains how adult learning differs from children's learning (Vaske 2001).
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  • Some question the extent to which these assumptions are characteristic of adults only, pointing out that some adults are highly dependent, some children independent; some adults are externally motivated, some children intrinsically; adults' life experience can be barriers to learning; some children's experiences can be qualitatively rich (Merriam 2001; Vaske 2001)
  • Power differences based on race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and disability can limit adults' autonomy and ability to be self-directed
  • Adults do not automatically become self-directed upon achieving adulthood. Some are not psychologically equipped for it and need a great deal of help to direct their own learning effectively (Beitler 1997; Titmus 1999)
  • Adults may be self-directed in some situations but at other times prefer or need direction from others (Courtney et al. 1999).
  • Research shows that motivational, affective, and developmental factors are more crucial in adults than in younger learners; adults are more able to be self-directed and reflective and to articulate learning goals, and they are more disposed to bring their life experiences to what and how they learn (Smith and Pourchot 1998)
  • Studies of metacognition indicate that children and adults differ at each level due to acquired expertise and active use of expert knowledge
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    This is an online version of Kerka's "Teaching Adults: Is it Different?"
Alicia Fernandez

LindyMac's Blog » Pedagogy, Andragogy, Heutagogy compared - 0 views

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    Good chart comparing pedagogy, andragogy and heutagogy
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    Good chart comparing pedagogy, andragogy and heutagogy
Alicia Fernandez

From Andragogy to Heutagogy - 0 views

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    In something of a landmark for education Knowles (1970) suggested an important change in the way in which educational experiences for adults should be designed. The approach, known as andragogy, contrasts quite sharply with pedagogy which is the teaching of children. This paper suggests there is benefit in moving from andragogy towards truly self-determined learning. The concept of truly self-determined learning, called heutagogy, builds on humanistic theory and approaches to learning described in the 1950s. It is suggested that heutagogy is appropriate to the needs of learners in the twenty-first century, particularly in the development of individual capability. A number of implications of heutagogy for higher education and vocational education are discussed.
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    In something of a landmark for education Knowles (1970) suggested an important change in the way in which educational experiences for adults should be designed. The approach, known as andragogy, contrasts quite sharply with pedagogy which is the teaching of children. This paper suggests there is benefit in moving from andragogy towards truly self-determined learning. The concept of truly self-determined learning, called heutagogy, builds on humanistic theory and approaches to learning described in the 1950s. It is suggested that heutagogy is appropriate to the needs of learners in the twenty-first century, particularly in the development of individual capability. A number of implications of heutagogy for higher education and vocational education are discussed.
Alicia Fernandez

Learner Generated Contexts - 0 views

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    University of London's work on developing learner-generated contexts and presents pedagogy, andragogy and heutagogy as a continuum of contexts versus a hierarchy.
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    University of London's work on developing learner-generated contexts and presents pedagogy, andragogy and heutagogy as a continuum of contexts versus a hierarchy.
Alicia Fernandez

Education 3.0 and the Pedagogy (Andragogy, Heutagogy) of Mobile Learning | User Generat... - 0 views

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    The evolution of the web from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 and now to Web 3.0 can be used a metaphor of how education should also be evolving, as a movement based on the evolution from Education 1.0 to Education 3.0.
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    The evolution of the web from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 and now to Web 3.0 can be used a metaphor of how education should also be evolving, as a movement based on the evolution from Education 1.0 to Education 3.0.
Hedy Lowenheim

Online Teaching Tips: Pedagogy - Communcation Tips - 0 views

  • Acknowledgment feedback assures students you have received their assignment submissions or that you are in search of answers to their questions and that you will respond soon. Sometimes you can give feedback to the entire class, reminding them that you are grading their papers and it will take a week or so to respond
Diane Gusa

Education 3.0: Altering Round Peg in Round Hole Education | User Generated Education - 0 views

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    A link that I felt you all would enjoy, from a previous EDUC 640 student.
Heather Kurto

The Myth of Learning Styles - 0 views

  • . While many of those scientists seek to discover general principles of learning, we all acknowledge that there are differences among students. Understanding these differences and applying that understanding in the classroom can improve everyone's education
  • First, whether we call it talent, ability, or intelligence, people vary in their capacity to learn different areas of content
  • Second, and often intertwined with ability, students differ in their interests. If a student loves the piano, or basketball, or chess, or the biology of frogs, that student will no doubt learn material related to that subject faster than another one who does not share that fascination.
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  • Third, students differ in their background knowledge, and that difference influences their learning
  • Many students will report preferring to study visually and others through an auditory channel. However, when these tendencies are put to the test under controlled conditions, they make no difference—learning is equivalent whether students learn in the preferred mode or not
  • The emphasis on learning styles, we think, often comes at the cost of attention to these other important dimension
  • Finally, some students have specific learning disabilities, and these affect their learning in specific ways.
  • just as our social selves have personalities, so do our memories.
  • The proof that the learning-styles theorist must find is that for some sort of content—whether it be math, poetry, or dodgeball—changing the mode of presentation to match the learning styles helps people learn. That evidence has simply not been found.
  • Third, learning-styles theory has succeeded in becoming “common knowledge.” Its widespread acceptance serves as an unfortunately compelling reason to believe it
  • Teachers should take into account the differences in learners' abilities. And adjusting a lesson not just to be appropriately pitched at the students' level of ability but to take into account their background knowledge and interests is surely an important first step in fostering learning.
  • if a student believes she is a visual learner and therefore disengages and daydreams when a lecturer turns off the PowerPoint and tells a story, this will prevent her from learning the concept through a compelling narrative. And while these beliefs may not have as direct an impact on performance reviews as they do in K-12 settings, a belief in learning styles occasionally shows up in student evaluations of teaching:
  • (can the auditory learner learn geography through hearing it? Can the visual learner become better at music by seeing it?)
  • While such evidence of learning styles would serve as a proof that they exist, the lack of evidence does not prove definitively that they do not exist
  • econd, learning-styles theory is sometimes offered as a reason to include digital media in the classroom.
  • . We shouldn't congratulate ourselves for showing a video to engage the visual learners or offering podcasts to the auditory learners. Rather, we should realize that the value of the video or audio will be determined by how it suits the content that we are asking students to learn and the background knowledge, interests, and abilities that they bring to i
  • Assessment of student interest can also be a useful tool for deciding how to approach the material in a given class
  • Students differ in their abilities, interests, and background knowledge, but not in their learning styles. Students may have preferences about how to learn, but no evidence suggests that catering to those preferences will lead to better learning. As college educators, we should apply this to the classroom by continuing to present information in the most appropriate manner for our content and for the level of prior knowledge, ability, and interests of that particular set of students.
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    Great article for all teachers. Thank you!
kevin volo

http://ualbany.mrooms.net/file.php/242/readings/v8n3_pelz.pdf - 1 views

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    This article led me to question what "learner centered" really means
Hedy Lowenheim

Teacher-Centered vs. Student-Centered Pedagogy - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher E... - 1 views

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    "Last week, I had my first peer-to-peer teacher observation as a new assistant professor. After teaching at the college level for 10 years, I felt my teaching and pedagogy were sound, so I wasn't too concerned about being observed by a colleague. In a debriefing after the observed session, my colleague noted that the class seemed to be "teacher-centered." This was not offered as a critique, but simply as a statement. The statement, however, surprised me. I had always seen myself as a "student-centered" type of teacher. Since I teach composition, which is typically a student-centered discipline, I was confused. I wondered if we'd been in the same classroom and witnessed the same interactions or if we were using the same definitions of those often-used terms."
Gary Bedenharn

Diversity and Inclusion: Strategies for Special Ed Teachers - 0 views

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    Strategies for a successful learning environment for students with disabilities.
Gary Bedenharn

Technology in Schools - Chapter 7: Technology Integration, Technology in Schools: Sugge... - 0 views

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    A in-depth look at the implementation of technology in K-12 schools.
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