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Melinda Connon

CPMP-Tools Software - 0 views

  •  
    This is a free Computer Algebra System designed to go with the Core-Plus Mathematics Curriculum. We are using a different curriculum, but this was referenced as a free tool as an alternative to the leading calculator product. Since we will be 1:1, my students don't need to invest in those calculators. CAS is not allowed on any college testing as of yet.
hansenn

ollie-afe-2018: Building a Better Mousetrap - 3 views

  • we ought to illicit student input when constructing rubrics
    • leighbellville
       
      Student input when creating rubrics would assist them in fully understanding the expectations set forth. It would be interesting to see examples of rubrics constructed with student input.
    • bbraack
       
      Having students illicit input in making of the rubric gives the students ownership and feel like they have a say in what should be assessed.
    • dykstras
       
      This would be tough for me to do in an ALgebra class as a majority of what i am teaching is brand new to them.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      I love this idea! I think there would be the initial learning curve of how to design a rubric, but a teacher could explain some of the main features/expectations of the projects and then let the students have some say in what excellent would look like etc.
    • carlarwall
       
      Building autonomy in our students and promoting learner agency! What a novel idea.
    • brarykat
       
      Great idea but realistically when would any teacher have time to gather input?  Could it be through exit tickets?  I could see Google Forms be used as a way to collect input. It still would mean dedicated time to review input.   
    • staudtt
       
      I have had mixed feelings with this. For those that have done it do students really help design to further learning? I have had conversations with educators that say in some cases students create simple rubrics to make the expectations easy to attain. Just wondering what experiences were.
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      As far as the time committment, I don't think it would have to be student created all day every day. I think allowing them to contribute when possible AND pulling out previous rubrics which students contributed on in the past shows the students that the teacher listens to student voice on a regular basis. Not necessarily 24/7. :)
  • dehumanize the act of writing
  • At the beginning of the process, you could ask a student to select to select which aspect she values the most in her writing and weight that aspect when you assess her paper.
    • leighbellville
       
      The idea of asking a student to choose which aspect "she values most" to determine the piece that will be weighted more heavily is an interesting one. I think it lends itself to creating personalized goals with students. Similar to when we ask teachers if there is a specific area they would like to focus on to receive a rating and feedback during an AIW scoring, it could create opportunities for growth and discussion between the teacher and the student.
  • ...67 more annotations...
  • rubrics can help the student with self-assessment; what is most important here is not the final product the students produce, but the habits of mind practiced in the act of self-assessment.
    • bbraack
       
      Though the end product is important, I agree that it is important for the student to think about what or how they are going to go about constructing the end product.
    • jhazelton11
       
      True. If students could accurately self-assess, their end-products ultimately become stronger.
    • stephlindmark
       
      This is when the true spirit of education come through when there is self reflection and self assessment occurs.
    • carlarwall
       
      The best way to get students to use self-reflection and self assessment is for teachers to also model this same practice.
    • dassom
       
      I often forget about the benefit of students being able to self assess. It would not be as useful in probably a math class since it's usually a yes or a no. However in a writing assignment it could help the students see how much work they need to do to get to the next level.
    • blockerl
       
      I agree that it is important to encourage self-assessment. I also like to show students things I have written so they can grade me on the rubric. They enjoy critiquing their teacher. :)
  • produced less interesting essays when they followed the rules [as outlined in a rubric]
    • bbraack
       
      I can see where students would be too concerned with following the rubric in writing, instead of just writing for the fun of it or pleasure of adding things to their writing that they might not when using a rubric.
    • krcouch
       
      I love when they write for fun but they still need to know the basics of grammar and sentence structure etc. and even writing and then going back and doing a self evaluation would be helpful to see if they got all the required items.
    • staudtt
       
      My biggest fear in creating a rubric is just this. How do I write it to encourage going the extra mile and encourage not squash creativity?
  • The second step is deciding who your audience is going to be. If the rubric is primarily used for instruction and will be shared with your students, then it should be non-judgemental, free of educational jargon, and reflect the critical vocabulary that you use in your classroom
    • leighbellville
       
      Purpose and audience are two important considerations when developing a rubric. The point of including "critical vocabulary that you use in your classroom" and ensuring that it is "non-judgemental" are pieces that can be overlooked by educators.
    • stephlindmark
       
      I really like that this emphasizes that the rubric be free from educational jargon.
    • carlarwall
       
      Student friendly language is key if we want the student self reflection to happen.
    • Mike Radue
       
      I think it's helpful to consider / reflect on the notion of the students as our audience in terms of assessment and feedback. Remaining non-judgemental is important to remember in the assessment mode.
  • an analytical rubric, however, will yield more detailed information about student performance and, therefore, will provide the student with more specific feedback.
    • bbraack
       
      I like the idea of having two or more separate scales (analytical rubric). Some parts of an assignment or test might have the student do more and so it should have a different scale. Specific feedback for students is always important so they can understand how they did and what they might need to improve on.
  • Can different scorers consistently apply the rubric?
    • brarykat
       
      I hadn't considered this being an issue until our small group assignment this week.  I've only used rubrics in isolation.  Interesting thought for teachers in department (i.e. Social Studies) using same rubric.
    • leighbellville
       
      Inter-rater reliability is essential. The goal is promoting creativity and creating clear expectations. However, by including too many details, we run the risk of formulaic writing. It is important to ensure students understand the expectations, but also stretch themselves and do not do the minimum required to reach proficiency. On the other hand, when enough detail is not included, then we can run the risk of a rubric that becomes too subjective and then two scorers can review the same piece of writing and score it differently based on their own expectations.
  • stultifying and others see as empowering.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      First of all, I had not seen the word stultifying before! In order for a rubric or other type of assessments to be empowering, students must understand how to use them and have examples that help guide the conversation. Students need to know the expectations and what is considered and exceeds and just beginning. We must put more ownership on the kids' ends to self-assess well before the final due date. We want kids to improve it. I have come to love checklists to help guide this.
    • stephlindmark
       
      I just commented about how students need to see the rubric before hand so they know what is expected of them. I love the idea of using checklists more to help guide the learning.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      Agreed. What good is a rubric if we don't let the students see it ahead of time? Are we setting students up for failure?
    • emmeyer
       
      Sadly, it is so easy to get wrapped up in all that we have to do in the short amount of time and not show the students the rubric, even when we know that it is more meaningful to show the rubric ahead of time.
    • blockerl
       
      I feel both ways about rubrics. Rubrics certainly help the students and teachers know what is expected out of an assignment, but they can sometimes restrict a student's creativity. I feel like we saw that when we applied our rubric to some of the assignments this week.
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think this is a major problem for a lot of PLCs I work with. Some don't even want students to see exemplars for fear of limiting creativity.
  • post-secondary educators in all disciplines
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I have had quite a bit of training on assessment and rubrics and still feel it is almost impossible to write a good one. Are our post-secondary educators, many of whom don't necessarily have a teaching background, feel comfortable developing rubrics? Who is in charge of this huge task that can be career ending or career beginning for some?
    • nickol11
       
      I couldn't agree more with your thoughts here! And depending on who is assessing your rubric the feedback, grows and glows you receive will also be different. OR what one person is taught as never to include in a rubric another person is taught to always do that.
    • dykstras
       
      Heather, I am with you. Right now I am torn because I am supposed to be assessing my Algebra classes by standards with rubrics created for me at the district level, but everything I read indicates that these should be teacher created. i'm not sure who is more (or less) qualified to be doing this type of work, the individual teachers or the district level decision makers?
  • current goals of solving real problems and using statistical reasoning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This perplexes me...As Mike pointed out the need to focus more on the process, do we focus too much on the final product? Can't we have separate rubrics that assess along the way to help with this? It would improve learning but and help teachers truly give a grade with multiple indicators that assess work ethic, collaboration, final product, and the process. I am glad to hear that our focus isn't always on the right answer but creating students who can reason and problem solve.
    • lisamsuya
       
      That idea resonates with me. Rubrics to help students with the process makes sense. Maybe the learning progressions would be helpful for teachers to create rubrics for "along the way."
  • The issue of weighting may be another area in which you can enlist the help of students
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This perplexes me...As Mike pointed out the need to focus more on the process, do we focus too much on the final product? Can't we have separate rubrics that assess along the way to help with this? It would improve learning but and help teachers truly give a grade with multiple indicators that assess work ethic, collaboration, final product, and the process. I am glad to hear that our focus isn't always on the right answer but creating students who can reason and problem solve.
  • “Meaningfully” here means both consistently and accurately—accurately measuring the specific entity the instructor intends to measure consistently student after student.
    • jhazelton11
       
      As a psychology major, this was a big deal in making sure you had sound products you were using. I'm wondering how much we are testing ours today. I know some PLC's that practice scoring examples with rubrics, then discuss, to ensure they are on the same page.
    • brarykat
       
      I see how beneficial rubrics can be in "meaningful" assessment.  It provides clear expectations for both teachers and students, keeps the student focused, and hopefully created to meet standards or other meaningful benchmark.  
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think sometimes the rubric is a tool for the teacher to score and not as much a tool for feedback and encouraging learning (from earlier in the article). When teachers common score, are they using that discussion to shape their instruction and feedback to students? I don't mean to imply they aren't, I don't currently work with a PLC willing to common score. They simply use the same rubric.
  • (whether they are rubrics or more nebulous modes of evaluation) from students is not only unfair and makes self-assessment more difficult, it maintains the traditional gap between what the teacher knows and what the student knows
    • jhazelton11
       
      We are running into this right now with our LMS... the new assessment piece doesn't allow us to upload the rubric. So, kids will have to do tasks without seeing the rubric. This is not okay with teachers, so hoping the tech people will build the rubric options in....
    • stephlindmark
       
      Agreed that withholding assessment tools does a disservice to the education for the students and is can give some teachers a power trip. I am glad to hear the tech at your school are working on this piece and that the LMS has a feature to upload rubric into the system.
  • one rubric can be used to assess all of the different papers assigned in a freshman composition course.
    • jhazelton11
       
      We use a common rubric when assessing special education students with writing goals (although some students have modified or specific rubrics addressing the specifics of their goal).
    • krcouch
       
      I love the idea of common rubrics so that the goals are spelled out. especiallywhen one teacher likes it this way and another likes it this way can be so confusing.
    • emmeyer
       
      I agree, it is nice to have the common rubric that makes all expectations the same.
  • Does the rubric relate to the outcome(s) being measured?
    • jhazelton11
       
      In paper-writing, sometimes we get really caught up in measuring outcomes like mechanics (capitalization, punctuation), and not content. Often we get so caught up in assessing those things, we lose sight of the higher order thinking that we are really trying to measure.
  • non-judgmental:
    • jhazelton11
       
      rubrics are certainly less judgemental when they are used formatively along the way during the process... it's not an end-all "gotcha"
  • system designed to measure the key qualities
    • stephlindmark
       
      The system of a rubric can be very abstract and not concrete if being teacher made. This has pros and cons, one pro if the teacher lets the students see it ahead of time, is that the students know what is expected of their performance.
    • srankin11
       
      Agree! This can be challenging for a new teacher or one that is new to teaching that unit/class. The rubric also allows for standards to be measured in multiple assessments.
  • actually learned rather than what they have been taught
    • stephlindmark
       
      This reiterates to me the difference we are learning between assessing and grading. It is our job as teachers to make sure all students our learning and we aren't just going through the motions of going from chapter to chapter in a textbook.
    • dassom
       
      Teaching is a personal profession and when a student doesn't perform well on an exam it can be a shot to the teachers ego. If we can get teachers to think of rubrics as a way to see if the students have learned it yet instead of just a summative yes or not they got it, it might become less personal and we can start focusing on how to get the students to actually learn in.
  • help instructors in all disciplines
    • stephlindmark
       
      A beauty about Rubrics is they can be utilized in all content areas for all educators.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      and they can be tailored for the specific assignment or project. I love that rubrics are not content specific and can be designed for individualized, specific things.
  • traditional gap between what the teacher knows and what the student knows
    • stephlindmark
       
      This makes me emotional and the emotion I feel is anger. That there are teachers that are still out there that try to one up the student and have a power trip. As an educator and mother of three students myself I see this and have to play the politically nice card and try to listen instead of get mad during conversations with teachers. This class is giving me knowledge on the importance of assessments and different types.
  • Well-designed rubrics
    • stephlindmark
       
      As stated in one of the videos teachers are not taught in pre-teaching programs how to ask good questions, nor do I think we were taught how to prepare well written rubrics. If rubric are well designed they should not be "formulaic" in their outcomes.
  • But she did it without saying anything coherent
    • stephlindmark
       
      I would say this student was not given a well written rubric.
    • staudtt
       
      Agreed. The rubric apparently wasn't written so that it focused on an outcome the required something coherent.
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      Leave it to kids to take your words literally in order to drive you figuratively insane. This just goes to show that a rubric shouldn't be driving students to one right answer but rather guiding them towards quality and learning.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      Absolutely. Kids will pick out one or two words and take them out of context. Is that what the intent of the rubric was? most likely no, but we need to teach the students that the rubric is a guide for expanding their learning with a few checks throughout the process.
  • mitagate both teacher bias and the perception of teacher bias
    • stephlindmark
       
      Anything to mitigate teacher bias is an improvement for many teacher assessments and evaluations of student learning.
    • emmeyer
       
      So true, removing teacher bias is difficult, and when we can do it, it is a good thing.
    • dassom
       
      I love the term real-life learning. Most professions don't have a good and bad type of employee. There are different levels of employees, and there's usually room for improvement.
    • brarykat
       
      In this respect, rubrics protect both the student and teacher. This document removes any possible bias perceived by students and/or parents.
    • blockerl
       
      The problem, which I don't know that it is really a problem, is that grading writing is biased. What I find creative or thoughtful might not be what another teacher thinks. The rubric can assess the prescriptive things like thesis, intro., conclusion, etc.
  • achiev[ing a] new vision of statistics education.
    • nickol11
       
      This is also true for the review systems for many companies. As I talk more and more with my friends outside of education, they talk of the rubrics that are used for their evaluation processes. I think that it is important as we teach students that they are able to relate their learning to rubrics as someday they will have to transfer that knowledge and understanding to their someday job/career.
  • a clear understanding of how rubrics operate
    • nickol11
       
      I really feel like many times when teachers are lost building rubrics they really need to zero in on the criteria needed to meet each indicator level. That said, they also need to model and communicate these items with their students.
    • emmeyer
       
      I agree with both of your points here. The indicator level makes the rubric clear and effective or not so much. Also, it is key for students to know what is expected of them. We, as adults, want to know what is expected of us, but we often think that students don't...which doesn't make sense.
  • wrote poorly when writing, as we might say, to the rubric
    • nickol11
       
      Have we considered to present the assignment to the students with the criteria THEN midway through the creative process bringing in the rubric so that students can assess their own work but still not lose their individuality?
  • Do the students find the rubric helpful?
    • nickol11
       
      I always find it helpful that in designing my rubrics (especially now when our school is building learning targets, assessment plans and more rubrics) that I test them out in my classrooms. They not only provide me feedback to student learning but I also have students provide me feedback as to how they are written, what I can change or add to make them work better for them. It also gives them even further buy-in to what you are doing in the class, as well and shows that you respect that there may be changes in learning but you are there for the student.
  • shared with students prior to the completion of any given assignment
    • hansenn
       
      I think rubrics should always shared with students when they start the assignment. so for me it is not an "IF:
    • dykstras
       
      I agree Noel! Mine are posted along side my standards and learning targets in my room, and constantly referred to.
    • krcouch
       
      I agree completely. I think the kids should know ahead of time what the expectation is.
  • reports that extensive use of rubrics can help minimize students’ educational disparities and bring fairness into assessment on numerous levels:
    • hansenn
       
      As long as the rubrics are well constructed and use I believe they do help lead to more equality and consistency in assessment. Teachers that give the same assessments, also need to review the rubrics together for consistency across schools and district.
  • students to simply make sure their essays have those features
    • hansenn
       
      Many students will just complete the assessment to meet the requirements in the rubric, but students are then meeting the expectations you wrote in the rubric. If you want them to do more change the rubric. What would happen if you did not share the rubric some might do more than expected and many would not because they have no idea what is expected.
  • Look at some actual examples of student work to see if you have omitted any important dimensions.
    • lisamsuya
       
      Looking at actual examples of student work ahead of time is a good idea. When we created the rubric for the Assess This assignment, we only had one example of student work. Then when we were given more pieces to assess, we quickly learned that the rubric would not work for all of the types of pieces that needed assessed.
    • hansenn
       
      Sometimes after using a new assessment an rubric, I reflect and notice the mistakes I made when creating the rubric and revise it. When you have students examples it makes it easier to evaluate your own rubric.
  • given their association with standardized assessment
    • dykstras
       
      Last I checked, the iowa Assessments were not scored by a rubric. This is something I continuously struggle with. if students, teachers, buildings, and districts are measured by standardized test scores, why do we push for standards based assessments and rubrics? This will be the first year I have never taught specific focus lessons geared to higher achievement on the iowa Assessments. My district wanted me to pilot standards based assessment so I am going all out! Can't wait to compare and contrast previous years' scores to this year. Stay tuned!
  • formulaic writing
    • dykstras
       
      Sounds more like a checklist approach. Who hasn't been guilty in their life of following a rubric like a checklist? Almost human nature.
  • “checksheets.”
    • dykstras
       
      There's my checklist comment! Should have kept reading :-) When I think of this in math though, I must admit it's a struggle to NOT say these skills are level 1, these are level 2, and so on.
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      I do see the checklists especially in math as a benefit when collaborative teacher teams are discussing what exactly the foundational skills of a priority standard look like and what dots to connect if a student is far away from achieving proficiency. I don't think that kind of learning progression would translate for a student who would see it as a checklist.
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think the checklist and deep learning piece are not necessarily mutually exclusive. The checklist may require certain content (based on the unit of study or course topic) but the rest of the rubric can be skill focused and framed in a growth model.
  • there has been “notable increases in the use of open-response questions, creative/critical thinking questions, problem-solving activities, […] writing assignments, and inquiry/investigation.”
    • dykstras
       
      This ties in directly with a comment I made earlier, "How does this help increase student achievement scores of high stakes standardized assessments like the Iowa Assessments.
  • Focus, Support, Organization, Conventions.
    • dykstras
       
      Good for us Group 1! We pretty much came up with these same criteria for our rubric :-)
  • Weighting
    • dykstras
       
      I have to admit as a math teacher this peaks my interest the most. Would love to work with teachers who establish their own grading criteria for rubrics but want help 'converting' that into a conventional grade for reporting purposes i.e. report cards.
  • Modify accordingly
    • dykstras
       
      As should be the case with anything we do as professional educators.
    • jwalt15
       
      I agree with you Shawn. Professional educators are constantly modifying and adapting their instruction to the meet the needs of their students and the curriculum. Change means growth and learning are taking place for both the student and the teacher.
  • that rubrics provide students with clear and specific qualities to strive for in those assignments that “are open-ended, aligned more closely to real-life learning situations and the nature of learning”
    • krcouch
       
      I agree that it helps the students know what they need to strive for instead of just open ended questions and then you get back your grade and you did not do well because it wasn't what the teacher wanted. I struggled with this in my undergrad classes.
    • stephlindmark
       
      I agree with this too that it provides students with the clear and specific qualities of the academic piece of material they are working on to be assessed. I have never thought about it being related closely to real-life learning situations though which is an imperative connection that should be made.
  • ‘some rubrics are dumb.’” He recounts,
    • stephlindmark
       
      I would say to that, it was a poorly written rubric is it is "dumb".
  • Usually a numerical value is assigned to each point on a scale
    • stephlindmark
       
      This has been my experience with rubric to be very specific in the world of special ed. especially when using them for IEP goal writing.
  • vital to the process and/or product of a given assignment,
    • carlarwall
       
      When I see the word vital in this statement, it reminds me that we should only be assessing the qualities that are truly important. We need to be so careful when we are creating and assessing student work to not over assess or under assess our students.
    • staudtt
       
      I think this is true. Sometimes as teachers we feel the need to give a grade to everything. And while we are constantly assessing, we need to focus on the the things that are vital for the student to know.
    • jwalt15
       
      I agree with both of your statements. The word "vital" does remind the teacher to assess only what is truly important. It is very easy for teachers to loose focus on the important skills being taught and turn their attention to mundane details that are easier to define like writing mechanics or content presentation.
  • rubrics to both assess and encourage student learning.
    • carlarwall
       
      This statement stands out to me because we should use rubrics for many purposes. Many times teachers just want to use the rubric to grade. We need to think about the feedback that we give students on a rubric as a way to encourage them to continue to push themselves in their learning and set goals for themselves.
    • dassom
       
      I really like the word encourage here. I do not really show the kids the rubric I am grading them on (although I should). I don't know if my students are mentally there to "want" to move to the next progression. Currently I am doing a lot of forcing to learn. I think that encourage puts the wanting to learn on the students shoulders.
    • trgriffin1
       
      I like this concept - assess and encourage, not just evaluate and move on to the next assignment. In my opinion, this is where the learning on assessment and feedback is so important for teachers and students.
  • When instructors plan on grading student thinking and not just student knowledge, they should articulate the vital features that they are looking for and make these features known to the student.
    • carlarwall
       
      Students should not have to play a guessing game with instructors. We as teachers need to be transparent with our students about what they need to know and should be able to demonstrate.
  • rubrics should be used in conjunction with other strategies
    • carlarwall
       
      So important to remember that rubrics are not the only way to provide feedback to students.
    • srankin11
       
      True! I would hope by the time that the students complete a project to get graded on by a rubric, that they have received feedback from formative assessments along the way.
  • some educators see
    • dassom
       
      I think it's important to understand both sides of why teachers may or may not be in favor of rubic. In a math class it seemed unresonable and unnecessary to use a rubric until we started talking about standard based grading. It still a hard concept I am wrapping my head around but I am getting there. I have had WAY more instruction than other math teachers in building and district so I know it will be a huge struggle for them to see the value.
  • become wooden
    • dassom
       
      This reminds me of readings we did that talked about rubics killing the creativity of the writings. It is definately a con, but for some students might help them get started in the writing process.
  • With your colleagues
    • dassom
       
      This is important. If you are going to go into rubric style grading you want input from like content people. I teach 8th grade math, and would want input from 7th and 9th teachers when developing rubrics.
  • different levels of that “deep learning”
    • brarykat
       
      The examples of why rubrics haven't been appreciated mainly boil down to poor design.  I like this statement because it shows the flexibility of rubrics.  The creator can decide how in-depth the learning can go or encourage the student to expand beyond with skinny columns.
  • different
  • A rubric that tells students, as a typical example, that they will get an A for writing a 1000 word essay that “cites x number of sources and supports its thesis with at least three arguments” will lead students to perceive writing as a kind of “paint-by-number” endeavor (Mathews).
    • Mike Radue
       
      When I see a rubric performance descriptions include a certain number of something, I can't help but think about this.
    • srankin11
       
      In this case, a teacher could use a checklist instead of a rubric. Trying to reach a specific number seems like it would cut down on the quality of some student work and only produce quantity.
    • tifinif
       
      I understand this type of rubric but have also wondered what # of words/ correct words/spelling etc. constitutes an A/B/C...grade. What an A means to mean might not be the same to another person.
  • I once gave extra credit to a student who realized that without providing a shred of meaningful content she could meet all the requirements of a state writing rubric he posted in his classroom. As required she used the word “persuade” and two synonyms, composed a clear topic sentence and closing sentence, and made no spelling or grammatical errors.
    • Mike Radue
       
      Even a well-intentioned rubric can leave something to be desired. This sounds more like a checklist but begs the argument around having a criteria for coherence.
  • Similarly, Heidi Andrade, in her study, “The Effects of Rubrics on Learning to Write,” has found that, while rubrics increased her students’ knowledge of the grading criteria and helped most of her students (especially the young male students) do well on the state writing test, many of the young female students, who had been more expressive in previous writing assignments
    • Mike Radue
       
      I find this interesting. The formal, structured writing is favored and the in this particular task, the expressive abilities of a writer are not assessed and reported on and/or flexibility to consider creative structures is not in place. We should look at a student's overall writing abilities in a variety of settings.
  • problem-solving, inquiry-based, student-centered pedagogy replacing the traditional lecture-based, teacher-centered approach in tertiary education
    • staudtt
       
      This to me is important. I try to use rubrics to assess the more inquiry/student centered work I do. There is still a place for teacher centered as there are skills that must be conveyed to all students for foundational learning. Finding that balance between teacher and student based is what can be challenging.
    • srankin11
       
      I agree that there needs to be a balance and that balance can be challenging. I believe this is important as it helps to reach all learning styles.
  • weight dimensions differently
    • staudtt
       
      I need to figure out a way to do this within our standards based grading system.
  • increases the likelihood of a quality product
    • srankin11
       
      It can be challenging and time consuming to create a quality product. In my opinion, teachers that can work in teams to develop rubrics have a bonus. Several minds working together may help to produce a better rubric. A quality rubric is important so students do not have to guess what teachers want as they work on a project.
    • trgriffin1
       
      Also, I think the teachers having that discussion is powerful - it can help develop their ideas or challenge misconceptions. I know some teachers fear students looking at an exemplar or rubric and all students creating basically the same thing. I think that is an error of instruction/feedback/design and not a student error. I think teachers having that discussion can prevent that type of problem.
  • description of the work rather than judgments about the work.
    • lisamsuya
       
      Descriptive vs evaluative is another way to think about this. It is difficult to keep evaluate words from our feedback and from rubric descriptions but descriptive feedback is more beneficial than evaluative feedback for students learning.
  • we need a rubric to judge our performance—
  • However, for the student to successfully use a rubric this way, the criteria must be made clear to them and the jargon used must not only be understandable to the student but also be linked specifically to classroom instruction.
    • jwalt15
       
      This is a powerful statement because it doesn't do any good to share rubrics with students if they don't understand the expectations or the way the teacher is using the rubric. Older students should have a better understanding of rubrics because they should have more experience with them. I think that younger students would benefit from initial exposures to rubrics especially since more and more teachers and employers are using them.
  • “Perhaps the greatest potential value of classroom assessment is realized when we open the assessment process up and welcome students into that process as full partners”
    • tifinif
       
      I think that this would be interesting to see what students consider valuable in the assessment. What is it that they want to gain from their input?
    • tifinif
       
      Totally agree. This goes back to the days when you study for a test, take the test and then do poorly because nothing you studied for was included on the test. If students have input or are able to know the expectations the results will hopefully reflect actual student learning.
  • teacher
  • explicit performance criteria, along with supporting models of work, make it possible for students to use the attributes of exemplary work to monitor their own performance
  • The result is many students struggle blindly, especially non-traditional, unsuccessful, or under-prepared students, who tend to miss many of the implied expectations of a college instructor, expectations that better prepared, traditional students readily internaliz
    • tifinif
       
      I think that having students of all ages know the expectations or knowledge of what is required for grades is crucial. As an adult it is important that we are clear with what we are assessing. Time is valuable at any age but certainly as an adult learner I don't want to spend hours working on a project only to find out that what I present or do was not relevant.
  • Can students and parents understand the rubric?
    • jwalt15
       
      It is important that students and parents understand the rubric because usually the project grade is the product or reflection of the rubric. If the students or parents don't understand the components of the rubric, then they will question the validity of the grade that was given.
  • to assess our rubric
    • blockerl
       
      I agree. When we make these rubrics, we do need to discover its effectiveness.
  • “red” or “reddish,
    • trgriffin1
       
      Sometimes this looks like teachers' favorite parts - marking up the sheet in every possible way. I personally don't even have red pens! I think it sends the wrong message.
  • to a hit or miss endeavor
    • trgriffin1
       
      This is why students see school as a game and only want to talk about how to get more points.
  • static
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think the classic example of this is something like "3-5 spelling errors" as a criterion. Some rubrics are bad because they focus on delimiting every possible error instead of being growth or learning focused.
Melinda Connon

GeoGebra - 2 views

  •  
    Great free geometry software that is similar to Geometer's sketchpad
  •  
    I have been using this tool to develop/convert investigative activities for Geometry through Calculus. The files files can be exported to HTML in a nicer format that Geometer's Sketchpad 4.0. I haven't tried GSP 5.0.
Deb Henkes

How Online Education Is Changing the Way We Learn [INFOGRAPHIC] - 1 views

    • Deb Henkes
       
      This info graphic really shows how online learning is changing and challenging our traditional mode of educating.
    • Andrea Accola-Sabin
       
      Our school offered a blended class through APEX learning. I was in charge of the Algebra II class and the students loved working at their own pace and when they wanted to work. There were time lines for assignments and test, but students could work ahead. If they had questions I was available for them. I don't think that they could do the course completely by themselves. I think that this was a great learning opportunity for the students, to see what is ahead of them in the learning system.
  • How Online Education Is Changing the Way We Learn [INFOGRAPHIC]
  • Check out this infographic from OnlineEducation.net about how the world of online learning has changed and grown over the years.
  •  
    Impressive graphic....reinforces the need for classes such as the ones through OLLIE.
  •  
    Ollie Iowa
Melinda Connon

Art of Problem Solving Foundation - 0 views

  •  
    This website is a great math contest practice location. Our students are so over committed, they don't have time to practice as a group for a math team...I'm not sure they'll do this. I did have an extra advanced 8th grader working on it when he was finished with his homework. It lets you try a problem twice, shows a solution, and builds in difficulty. I have lots to learn from these problems -- many of which are beyond Core Curriculum.
mschutjer

ollie-afe-2019: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 6 views

    • nealjulie
       
      I thought this quote was interesting. I always believe that having more than one data point helps a teacher see more of a rounded picture of that student. Relying on just one assessment isn't fair to the student. I believe we should look at multiple assessments, formative assessments, check points to help our students grow. JN
  • assessor needs to have a clear picture of what achievement he or she intends to measure. I
    • rhoadsb_
       
      Assessment needs to be directly tied to the standard you are teaching too.
    • Deborah Cleveland
       
      When we were rolling out the Iowa Core, we really emphasized how content, instruction, and assessment were part of the "curriculum". Each piece playing an integral part in student learning.
    • nealjulie
       
      I think we as teachers need to make sure we are focused on what essentials we need to assess. We have the mindset that we must teach the content, and not the process. JN
  • ...66 more annotations...
  • Do the results provide clear direction for what to do next?
    • nealjulie
       
      Do we use the data for reteaching? JN
  • Students learn best when they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning
    • kmolitor
       
      I really like this idea of having students take responsibility for their own learning, and putting the learning target in language they can understand would definitely help!
    • mpercy
       
      I agree that students do learn best when they take on the responsibility but I also think this is the ideal situation and often does not happen. How do we motivate more students to do this?
    • alisauter
       
      I agree with this, but it seems so foreign to students. I think we need to plan on a lot of modeling to shift the responsibility to them.
    • nealjulie
       
      Student friendly learning targets! I believe involving students in tracking their own learning targets is very powerful! It's high on the Hattie scale. JN
  • f we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      While this seems like a straightforward idea, in reality, making a learning purpose clear and understandable to everyone - students included - can be difficult. Especially in English, the skill were teaching is not clear cut. CCSS Reading Literature 11-12.6 asks students to "Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant." However, there's no "right" answer to this skill. Student analysis of "what is really meant" could encompass a huge range of ideas. Crafting an assessment and teaching/learning opportunities that clearly delineate "proficient" analysis from "poor" analysis can't always be put into clear and understandable language. How can you quantify the qualitative?
    • kimgrissom
       
      There is truth in the challenge. But I know I have been guilty of knowing what I was looking for but not clearly communicating it to students. Then they are left to guess...which means they are likely to guess in at least some ways incorrectly. I think the more modeling we do, the more "anchor papers" we provide, the better students achieve our expectations. Putting those expectations into words and examples is its own challenge, but a worthy one.
    • cathy84
       
      It is nice to hear from other high school English teachers about the difficulty of measuring such subjective skills. I always struggled. One strategy I did find helpful was assigning paragraph writing as an assessment and scoring them 1-5, with a 3 being adequate and a 5 outstanding Then we would do several together and discuss what constituted a 3 and the differences between 3-4-5. That did seem to help, and students personalized the challenge of getting at least a 3 to show competency and reaching for outstanding.
  • t also helps them assign the appropriate balance of points in relation to the importance of each target as well as the number of items for each assessed target.
    • annott
       
      I really like this chart, it's easy to follow and easy to read.
  • minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This is where I know as an English teacher, I can get bogged down in the details. All of my writing assignments have an assessment category for "M.U.G.S." as we call them (mechanics, usage, grammar, spelling), but those aren't actively taught and retaught every unit. We just expect students to have a certain level of proficiency at this point. However, that isn't always the case. There are MANY students who have not internalized the "rules" of writing. Their mechanics (punctuation) seems haphazard, grammar atrocious, usage nonexistent, and spelling like they fell asleep on their keyboard. However, a complete lack of those skills might not prevent them from being able to distinguish "what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant." I have to be careful to not allow my internal bias against poor writing ability to distort an accurate estimate of a student's learning and demonstration of the skill.
    • kmolitor
       
      When I read through this about minimizing bias it made me think of the old ITBS/ITED tests and a student we had that was new to this country. The student was very bright but he did not perform well on the test because of bias. One example I recall was he had no idea what a fir tree was as where he was from there was no such thing.
  • Will the users of the results understand them and see the connection to learning?
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This is also where I struggle. Our department uses the online program Turnitin.com to give students feedback on written assessments and grade almost all work. This is partially to alleviate issues with plagiarism, but mostly because it gives students and teachers a one access point to communicate feedback. The program allows users to submit rubrics that students can see. We've started assessing rough draft using the final rubric so students can see where their work is in the rough draft stage so they know which paper criteria need work. They also can view my feedback on the paper that tells them how to fix what they need to fix. My frustration is when students aren't willing to go back and look at the feedback on the paper or rubric so they know what learning skills they still need to work on. How can we motivate them to look at the results, see the connections, and make the progress in learning?
    • kmolitor
       
      That is a great point! How do we motivate kids to go back and look at the feedback and make changes. Many of our kids just want to know what do I need to know to pass the test or assignment and once they pass that's all that matters.
    • jennham
       
      You have mentioned before that kids always want to know what they have to do in order to get an A or pass...but that's what I want to know when I take a course. I want/need to know what the expected outcomes are. I feel that kids have so many classes, tests, and assignments that if they don't ask those questions or think in that kind of a structured fashion that they will crash and burn. I get that we want them to LEARN and be passionate, but especially in required courses, the passion just isn't always there and the class literally is a box to check off.
  • From a formative point of view, decision makers at the classroom assessment level need evidence of where students are on the learning continuum toward each standard
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This is another area where I personally struggle. The time and flexibility needed to be truly responsive is astronomical. I currently teach 4 of the 10 sections of English 10 at Indianola High School. As a class cohort, we try to be within a day or two of each other in content delivery. However, if my students don't get a concept, it's difficult to take a day to reteach since that throws off my alignment with the other teachers. It also means that I would have would have different periods at different places. I'm hoping the flipped and blended learning opportunities will help with the time and organization issues I currently have. If I can break groups up into smaller cohorts based on skill, then use flipped/blended methods for each group, I can (hopefully) accomplish more within the time frame. It makes organization more complicated, but allows more flexibility.
    • kimgrissom
       
      This is why common formative assessments can be so helpful. If some of your students aren't getting something, it's likely that others aren't either. If you look at the whole team's formative data, it could be that everyone needs to adjust rather than just you.
    • barbkfoster
       
      And if your class is doing more poorly than another class, you can have conversations about the different instructional practices being used. We all do our best but it's ok to not be the best. Together we can do what is best for our students.
  • Do the results provide clear direction for what to do next?
    • mgast40diigo
       
      We receive a lot data but never do much with it. What do other schools do with their data? There are great questions within this paragraph that should be asked when the results are in. MG
  • A grade of D+, on the other hand, may be sufficient to inform a decision about a student's athletic eligibility, but it is not capable of informing the student about the next steps in learning.
    • mgast40diigo
       
      SBL and transitioning from all letter grades is a lengthy process but very beneficial for feedback purposes. MG
    • tommuller4
       
      I agree with you about the SBL and how it shows a student exactly what they know or what they need to improve on. A letter grade just give them a percentage of the time they have a correct answer. Doesn't give them any information at what they know or don't know.
    • kmolitor
       
      I agree Matt, but how do we get kids to go back and internalize the feedback?
  • aim for the lowest possible reading level,
    • mgast40diigo
       
      I am curious to see if the new Iowa Assessments focus on this. MG
    • kimgrissom
       
      I think this is also interesting because I know there are some tests that do this purposefully to "increase the rigor" of the test. For instance, AP exams notoriously use vocabulary to make the questions harder. This is saying it could be not just separating those who know less about the content, but also those who have different background, cultural knowledge, or just English as a first language. I, too, wonder how the ISASP will do with this.
    • mpercy
       
      Are we challenging our top students and preparing them for their futures when we use low reading levels? Seems to contradict what we are trying to accomplish.
    • rhoadsb_
       
      This is so very important as we are seeing a dramatic increase in student populations that are not fluent in English.
    • jennham
       
      I have developed a system where I always read math tests out loud. That way students are not missing information due to not understanding the vocabulary.
    • chriskyhl
       
      Jenn that's an interesting concept of reading the tests outloud....have never thought of doing that in a HS classroom but might help!
  • The classroom is also a practical location to give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate what they know and can do, adding to the accuracy of the information available from that level of assessment.
    • rhoadsb_
       
      This is an important thing to consider in the design of your course.
    • tmolitor
       
      I agree, providing students multiple opportunities to show their knowledge, and understanding needs to be done.
  • Most assessments developed beyond the classroom rely largely on selected-response or short-answer formats and are not designed to meet the daily, ongoing information needs of teachers and students.
    • mgast40diigo
       
      I fall into this trap with assessments. I do need to incorporate more questions that focus on higher DOK levels. MG
    • jennham
       
      You are not alone. So do I. When I have an average of 70+ students to assess on math skills, these are easier.
  • Five keys to assessment quality
    • sjensen21
       
      To summarize, the 5 keys to assessment quality are: 1. clear purpose 2. clear learning targets 3. sound assessment design 4. effective communication of results 5. student involvement in the assessment process
    • cathy84
       
      Great idea on how to use an annotation tool. I can see this being very beneficial to high school students
    • chriskyhl
       
      thats a really cool usage! Could see teaching my kids to do this when doing technical reading
  • grouping the assessments
    • sjensen21
       
      Grouping assessments into levels: ongoing classroom assessment (daily work/observation), periodic interim/benchmark assessment (weekly quizzes/ group work), and annual state/district standardized assessments. I would add summative unit assessments (tests/projects) here also.
    • kmolitor
       
      Grouping assessments should give us a better picture of where students are at and help to identify where they need help.
  • cannot measure more complex learning targets at the heart of instruction
    • sjensen21
       
      Our school district is doing the ISASP this year for the first time. This is a computer based test based on the Iowa Core. I worry how these results will be used to evaluate student mastery of content specific standards. How much effort will students put into the test and are there too many distractors that will bias the results?
    • kimgrissom
       
      Those are legitimate concerns. On the other hand, what this quote makes me think of regarding the ISASP is that at least the types of questions are not only selected response. So many of the standards in the Core can not be measured by the only multi-choice questions in the previous test.
  • Bias can also creep into assessments and erode accurate results.
    • sjensen21
       
      On the new computer based standardized tests, ISASP, I worry that there will be skewed results, because this if the first time students have had to take a standardized test online.
  • descriptive feedback
    • kmolitor
       
      We do need to make sure that our feedback is helpful. Telling students "fix this" or "revise this paragraph" doesn't help them learn, the feedback needs to be more specific and point to the learning target.
    • tommuller4
       
      I totally agree with giving feedback about why they missed a question or problem. If you just count it wrong the student might now have any idea why they got the question wrong.
  • The assessor must begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment.
    • kimgrissom
       
      I think a lot of times we default to "for a grade" but there are lots of other reasons to consider.
    • tommuller4
       
      I think this is very important sentence. I know I don't do the greatest job of outlining learning goals everyday and explaining value in each. It's same thing for test. Are testing because its end of chapter or because you want to assess learning goals from the chapter that were the most important from the chapter and meet the standards for your class.
    • annott
       
      I agree Tom, I am not the best at covering learning targets with students. And maybe standards based learning will help focus my lesson designing and improve student learning.
    • rhoadsb_
       
      I think it is very important that we focus on the learning that is taking place within our classrooms and not on grading. Our assessments should be an avenue to strengthen learning and to inform the teacher what they need to do for learning to continue to occur.
    • alisauter
       
      This reminds me of UBD, or working backwards. The teacher knows the outcome first, and then builds the learning and assessments.
  • Selecting an assessment method that is incapable of reflecting the intended learning will compromise the accuracy of the results.
    • kimgrissom
       
      I thought the assessment brainstorming we did at the end of last week with ways to assess face-to-face vs. online was an interesting way to think of all the ways we can assess. I think as teachers we often default to a couple content-specific norms and it would be good to open up to other alternatives on occasion.
    • barbkfoster
       
      Many years ago I remember assessing my math students at the end of the year with a multiple choice test. None of my tests during the year were multiple choice, but finals were required and it was the most efficient way to get my grades done :( I'm sure it did compromise the accuracy of the results.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
    • kimgrissom
       
      I was a part of a John Hattie book study this year. In Visible Learning he talks a lot about success criteria being so clear that students can accurately self-assess their work. I think that's a really great goal for any rubric or learning target.
    • rhoadsb_
       
      Again here we should aim to write them in the lowest reading level possible
  • common assessments.
    • kylelehman
       
      I totally agree with this statement that we are assessing more than ever before. I don't think that it has to be a bad thing. However, I could see from a student's point of view that it could be overkill if they don't understand why.
  • Teachers have choices in the assessment methods they use
    • mpercy
       
      Is it important for assessments to contain all 4 types of responses?
    • jennham
       
      I don't think so. I think the teacher is to pick the best assessment method for that particular learning target.
    • tmolitor
       
      I agree with Jen. I think the teacher would need to use professional judgement to decide what the best assessment method would be. Sometimes it may include all 4 types though.
  • inform what decisions?
    • kylelehman
       
      This has been a large debate that we have been having at our district. We need some sort of feedback roll out that will say how we have managed the data and what the data is and will be used for.
    • tommuller4
       
      I think is important part for a teacher after each assessment to use results to maybe modify teaching topics that students performed poorly on. Maybe need an extra day to cover certain topics more in depth if students struggled with it on test or maybe we have a poorly written question on the test causing students to miss points.
  • communicated
    • kylelehman
       
      This has been another large debate that we have had. We want to make sure that our assessments are given back in a timely manner but we also want to make sure that they have correct and accurate feedback as well as to help the student know what they did well and where to improve and all of that takes time.
    • barbkfoster
       
      TIME! It's a four-letter word in teaching! The feedback we give students is WAY more important than the grade, and way more time consuming. How do we effectively give the feedback necessary for student growth in a timely manner? I'd love to hear strategies from others here.
  • Summative applications
    • kylelehman
       
      I think that this becomes more and more important as we look into SBG. Summatives are what tell you the story of how the students mastered something and if you want to see the evidence along the way, that becomes the formatives.
  • Periodic interim/benchmark assessments can also serve program evaluation purposes, as well as inform instructional improvement and identify struggling students and the areas in which they struggle.
    • mpercy
       
      Our math department has been looking at the AAIMS tests for Algebra students which could be used as data to support the learning taking place.
    • annott
       
      This makes me think of the concept of scaffolding. Which I have used in my classroom when lesson designing. Now I need to do the same thing with assessing. Assess students periodically both formative and summative.
  • minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • kmolitor
       
      As teachers we do have to be careful of bias and making assumptions. When I read through this about minimizing bias it made me think of the old ITBS/ITED tests and a student we had that was new to this country. The student was very bright but he did not perform well on the test because of bias. One example I recall was he had no idea what a fir tree was as where he was from there was no such thing.
    • cathy84
       
      I completely understand this. Teaching writing and reading at the secondary level is so very difficult.
  • Creating a plan like this for each assessment helps assessors sync what they taught with what they're assessing
  • Knowledge targets, which are the facts and concepts we want students to know.
    • annott
       
      As our district moves toward standards based grading, understanding our knowledge targets is naturally happening during this process.
    • alisauter
       
      We are working on Power Standards in our buildings. I think this would fit with those too.
    • barbkfoster
       
      It all goes back to 1) what do we want them to know and 2) how will we know when they know it. We are working hard on choosing power standards. It is a long and exhausting process but a necessary one. Even after power standards are chosen, we need to break them down into learning targets our students can understand.
  • students to track their own progress on learning targets
    • whsfieldbio
       
      I have seen this done throughout a unit of student with a Red Light, Yellow Light, Green Light rating for students to self assess their percieved understading of a learning target. This self assessment was revisited frequently and used to drive student to specific learning activities that they needed to work on.
    • tmolitor
       
      I think allowing the students to self-assess and set goals is really beneficial. I like the idea of using red light, green light, and yellow light for students to show the teacher their understanding.
  • performance assessment or personal communication may be less effective and too time-consuming
    • whsfieldbio
       
      One dilema that teacher face is the factor of time which we all know. I have worked with teacher who have over 200 students in their classes and often default to a selected response assessment item even when a performance based would be more appropriate. It is challenging to assess and provide feedback in timely manner with this many students. This is not an excuse, but a barrier that needs to be explored.
  • or making the correct answer obvious
    • whsfieldbio
       
      I would also suggest to make non correct answers plausible and avoid answers that are glaringly impossible. If student select the incorrect answer then teachers could be able to identify misconceptions from an item analysis.
  • dependable data generated at every level of assessment.
    • whsfieldbio
       
      I wonder how much professional develoment or preservice teacher training is spent on looking at data to make decisions. There is most likely a range of understanding of what data should be used to design instruction. This is why is it good to have a strong PLC for teachers to work through data and assessment creation (which is really challenging in itself).
    • chriskyhl
       
      we are starting this assessment process and it is very challenging
    • mistermohr
       
      It is amazing to me that data acquisition/analysis and student feedback/scores are largely two separate endeavors. In this day and age, these should be the same step. Without some automation, I don't think this can actually be done. At least not in a meaningful manner.
  • track their own progress on learning targets
    • whsfieldbio
       
      I have seen this done throughout a unit of student with a Red Light, Yellow Light, Green Light rating for students to self-assess their perceived understanding of a learning target. This self-assessment was revisited frequently and used to drive student to specific learning activities that they needed to work on.
  • if students will be the users of the results because the assessment is formative
    • rhoadsb_
       
      Use of formative assessment is vital to the success of students and to inform teachers. this should be a daily practice and done through multiple types of measures.
  • n the past, few educators, policymakers, or parents would have considered questioning the accuracy of these tests.
    • alisauter
       
      Is this because educators had more trust among these stakeholders back in the day?
  • Assessment literacy is the foundation for a system that can take advantage of a wider use of multiple measures.
    • alisauter
       
      We need to be teaching assessment literacy in teacher prep classes.
  • inform students about their own progress
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      Shouldn't this be the goal of all assessments? If it serves other purposes great. If this does not become the focus of the assessment, then a student will start chasing points.
    • mschutjer
       
      Ideally testing should serve the purpose of helping the teacher and student see areas where they need improvement...
  • clear curriculum maps for each standard, accurate assessment results, effective feedback, and results that point student and teacher clearly to next step
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      I believe that this is important because highlights the role feedback plays in the assessment process. I think we often forget feedback.
    • tmolitor
       
      I agree, feedback is really important. It also needs to be provided as quickly as possible.
    • zackkaz
       
      Feedback is most certainly key for something that can be so subjective like writing, but I also think providing feedback on LOT can also improve students understanding. I know that is something I struggle with - leaving the necessary feedback. There's always a time crunch, and sometime students that assessed well receive little feedback even though they could use it too.
  • students can use the results to self-assess and set goals.
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      We need to model how to self-assess and set goals. I was guilty of expecting that my students knew how to do this.
    • Deborah Cleveland
       
      Yes. It is indeed a paradigm shift for teachers and students. Modeling the process to students and talking about it will help them get the most out of the assessment process.
  • learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan that matches the learning targets represented in the curriculum.
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      I wonder if the creators of ISASP has taken this into consideration. It would be interesting to learn how they accomplished this.
    • cathy84
       
      Excellent point!
    • cathy84
       
      I wonder who "we" are when the authors say "we're betting." I don't think it's the teachers, for we know the limits of testing.
  • cultural insensitivity.
    • cathy84
       
      I think this is a way bigger problem than ,most people realize.
    • cathy84
       
      I think this is a real problem with ISASP
    • zackkaz
       
      I'm willing to let ISASP run its course though - I think it is vastly improved from the old ITBS. At least it does have open ended questions and require students to process and write instead of the good ole A, B, C, or D.
  • Making decisions that affect individuals and groups of students on the basis of a single measure
    • robertsreads
       
      The idea that a single measure can accurately assess students is absolutely baffling to me. ~KMR
    • chriskyhl
       
      definitely a scary concept with the large presence and weight placed on these assessments
    • mschutjer
       
      it seems this concept totally contradicts what education stands for. Only good test takers like these tests.
  • We're betting that the instructional hours sacrificed to testing will return dividends in the form of better instructional decisions and improved high-stakes test scores
    • robertsreads
       
      I could not agree with this more. The amount of hours we spend preparing students for a single test is astounding. The time would be better served to actually teaching students content.
  • The goal of a balanced assessment system is to ensure that all assessment users have access to the data they want when they need it, which in turn directly serves the effective use of multiple measures.
    • robertsreads
       
      Given the requests for data from our administrators and other stakeholders, this is imperative.
  • From a summative point of view, users at the classroom and periodic assessment levels want evidence of mastery of particular standards; at the annual testing level, decision makers want the percentage of students meeting each standard.
    • robertsreads
       
      It is more beneficial for students to demonstrate mastery of standards than for students to test well.
  • assessment formatively
    • barbkfoster
       
      I feel like we could do a better job of formatively assessing students. When students hear the word assessment, they think quiz or test and they get apprehensive. We need to change their mindset and show them how they can use formative assessments (exit tickets, class polls, one-minute papers, etc) to help them take control of their own learning.
  • the use of multiple measures does not, by itself, translate into high-quality evidence
    • jennham
       
      I happy to say that in our district we are working very hard at using only those assessments that we find useful to both the teachers as well as the students. We have drastically cut back on the number of assessments our students take.
  • At the level of annual state/district standardized assessments, they involve where and how teachers can improve instruction—next year.
    • jennham
       
      I feel this takes us dangerously close to teaching to the test. Is that really what is best for students? Changing everything around in order for them to score well on standardized tests? If the goal is truly to benefit students and how they learn, I am all for it no matter what.
  • "I can make good inferences. This means I can make a guess that is based on clues."
  • Who is the decision maker?This will vary. The decision makers might be students and teachers at the classroom level; instructional leaders, learning teams, and teachers at the periodic level; or curriculum and instructional leaders and school and community leaders at the annual testing level.
    • zackkaz
       
      For those that teach AP they also have the AP board to assess
  • or summatively—to feed results into the grade book.
    • zackkaz
       
      Evan, just curious since you suggested that potentially the answer is no grade book? How would use summative assessments? Would students just keep repeating until they were garnered proficient?
  • Effectively planning for the use of multiple measures means providing assessment balance throughout these three levels, meeting student, teacher, and district information needs.
    • chriskyhl
       
      so important to consider all 3 levels when planning
  • Reasoning targets, which require students to use their knowledge to reason and problem solve. A reasoning target in math might be to use statistical methods to describe, analyze, and evaluate data. Performance skill targets, which ask students to use knowledge to perform or demonstrate a specific skill, such as reading aloud with fluency. Product targets, which specify that students will create something, such as a personal health-related fitness plan.
    • Deborah Cleveland
       
      These categories of learning targets seem to tie in nicely with authentic learning.
  • balanced system
  • balanced system
    • Deborah Cleveland
       
      Do districts map out these different groups of assessments on a yearly calendar? It would be interesting to see how many days a year are students engaging in assessment and also the types of assessment.
  • overflow of testing
    • Deborah Cleveland
       
      Yes. There is a lot of testing these days One of my friends mentioned that between testing and snow days she hadn't "taught" from MLK day to almost President's day. Needless to say she was anxious about how well students wee going to demonstrate learning when they hadn't had much instruction for over a month.
  • schools now make decisions about individual students, groups of students, instructional programs, resource allocation, and more.
    • mistermohr
       
      I think that these decisions are made too infrequently. One test may place a student in a group that is not in your zone of proximal development. They may be stuck there for quite some time.
  • We're betting that the instructional hours sacrificed to testing will return dividends in the form of better instructional decisions and improved high-stakes test scores
    • mistermohr
       
      and to think of the potential impact on opportunities available to students...crazy
    • mschutjer
       
      too much time is spent testing....
  • about the overall level of students' performance.
    • mistermohr
       
      From my experience, most of the high stakes testing explicitly states that the results should not be used on the individual student decision making level. Oh the irony....
  • ults
annott

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 5 views

  • When that happens, the structures around the classroom leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering.
    • jennham
       
      This is a challenge for me. How do we personalize learning while ensuring that teachers are teaching and students are learning what is expected? I do not want online learning to become just something else they do in order to check a box on Yes! I have personalized learning for my students!
    • tracyc4
       
      Agreed. We have a lot of boxes to tick already. Where does the accountability lie when students don't achieve their goals/what is expected of them?
  • It’s as if engaging them in learning without technology has become this impossible task.
    • jennham
       
      Whoa! Having kids engaged in school and in their learning is something teachers have been doing long before technology became an imperative part of education. (I realize he agrees with me. That anyone could feel this statement strongly is what I reacted to.)
    • tmolitor
       
      I thought this was interesting as well. It seems like an easy out for anyone that needs an excuse. Oh it's not the content we just can't compete with their video games.
  • the best thing we can do for kids is empower them to make regular, important, thoughtful decisions about their own learning, what they learn and how they learn it
    • jennham
       
      How do we make this happen? I do not think that one teacher in a building can pull this off. I see this as being a monumental shift in an entire district to truly make personalized learning personal to each student.
    • anonymous
       
      I think this is also one of my main questions, and something I hope to explore in this course. Does personalized/personal learning work in small doses? In the confines of a single classroom or a single unit?
    • annott
       
      That is a total shift in thought, and I agree, how do we do it? Give me the manual!
  • ...30 more annotations...
  • personalization is “not about giving students what they want, it’s about a recommended learning path just for them.”[
    • jennham
       
      This really sums up, for me, the difference between personalized learning and having personal learning. I think it is the learning path that educators get caught up on. The Oh! This program scales up the difficulty if the student answers the question right and scales it down if they miss it!, type of thing. That isn't personal to the student at all.
  • This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model.
    • mgast40diigo
       
      What do you do with students that work at a slow pace and can't meet deadlines? That may lead to more of a teacher directed approach to speed things up.
    • tommuller4
       
      I think this would be a hard sell in the high school where the smarted kids would complain about having to do more than the other students. They would say that its not fair.
    • tmolitor
       
      I think you both bring up really good points. How can you even grade something like this when one student does twice the work of another?
  • We can truly individualize the classroom by using data-driven platforms to continually assess and track progress through any given curriculum and provide the most relevant content or resources to any given learner based on specific needs or learning styles
    • mgast40diigo
       
      Technology is amazing. There are so many tools out on the web that I haven't even used yet. I amazed how kahoot, quizizz, and google forms can assess and track data. It is scary to think what the next five years may look like in education and especially the tools we will have access to.
  • But I marvel how that, in many schools I work with, the prevailing narrative seems to be that we can’t engage kids without technology, without a smartphone, tablet computer or some other multimedia device or tool.
    • mgast40diigo
       
      There is a lot of truth to this. The problem is not only is this the truth in schools but households as well.
    • k_gibson
       
      We can't stop the technology train, nor should we. Tech, when used responsibly and effectively, is an invaluable tool in our society and schools. The key here is 'effectively.' Too many educators put kids on computers to look cool,"Hey, I'm using technology!" However, in reality, it's busy work and low-level thinking. What we ask students to do with technology is key to creating a truly PL classroom.
  • Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
    • mgast40diigo
       
      How would this work? The 3 most important things in my son's life are Fortnite, socializing with friends, and sports. Where would the balance be if they were in charge of designing their own courses?
    • anonymous
       
      Depends on the topic, of course, and hard to motivate either way- but there is reading/writing/communicating in social media, Fortnite, and sports. There is history in sports. Math in sports. I'm sure your son uses our fundamental skills and builds new knowledge using the things he loves.
    • k_gibson
       
      I think to ensure that learning happens outside of the classroom, we need to shift education to a trade school model, where students are shadowing professionals, choosing apprenticeships/internships, etc. during normal school hours. These experiences would replace some of the traditional classes during the school day.
  • 2. Education is about the transmission of bits of information, not the construction of meaning.
    • k_gibson
       
      I disagree with how this statement is written. Education isn't entirely about the transmission of information, but information is still important and shouldn't be dismissed. Education can't be an 'either/or,' it must be a 'both.' Students need information in order to apply it, design, and create. Without information, there is a huge gap left in their learning called 'ignorance.'
    • anonymous
       
      I agree with your statement- I had to re-read this section a few times to understand exactly what they were getting at. I think the idea here is that students should be choosing/finding their information, though, not having that information 'delivered' to them.
  • same knowledge
    • k_gibson
       
      Every person/child is unique. I agree that skills, and to a point knowledge, should vary. However, there is a certain well-rounded nature we want children to possess to be successful in society. Hence why we created a common set of standards, like Iowa Core. There should always be certain skills and information we set forth for children to learn. Then, there should be an element to learning that opens up new experiences and opportunities for exploring interests. Balance is important, I think.
    • cmanring
       
      Very true. I teach History and Government. There is some information that must be had by all. The method, delivery, way can be different but none the less some items must be covered.
    • anonymous
       
      I unfortunately don't remember the source, though I'm sure it's something I could look up- but I was once taught/read that a lot of the things we do is just to train our brain to do more complex tasks. We may not necessarily use all the algebra and trig we learn, for example, but it builds new connections in our brains and helps us learn and think in new ways. That's sometimes difficult to explain to students.
  • it implies moving away from the industrialized form of education that pumps out cookie-cutter students with the
  • and skills.
  • commitment to individualism yet experience a “relentless pressure to conform
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      This sounds like every teenager's experience. I wonder if there is more pressure now that we have social media.
  • learning tends to nourish kids’ curiosity and deepen their enthusiasm
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      Is this the goal of education? Our at least one of our hidden goals that we do not measure. We only include it in our mission statement.
  • it involves collaboration and takes place in a communit
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      I think we often forget this part of learning. We are quick to hand students a computer and system to help students learn.
  • “Follow the money” is apt advice in many sectors of education
    • mrsmeganmorgan
       
      I think of many of the computer programs that my children use and wonder who is profiting from the subscription. It really becomes obvious when you attend ISTE and see the over the top parties that being thrown by various EdTech companies.
  • ‘We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
    • cmanring
       
      The longer I teach (22 years) the more I find that the continued focus on test scores hampers a lot of learning. Teaching to the test, focusing on the test, etc. , etc. are sometimes a large waste of everyone's time. In this current era do we actually need to have state testing to decide if a school is functioning? When teachers are evaluated there is not a test.
    • tommuller4
       
      As a teacher its hard to give up some control of the classroom and give students the freedom to learn in whatever style fits them the best.
    • tmolitor
       
      I agree, it is hard to give up control of the classroom, sometimes it feels like giving up control the whole class will go crazy.
  • First, ask just about any vendor of personalization technology what the intended outcome is and, with a little prodding, you’ll get to this: better test scores.
    • cmanring
       
      The longer I teach (22 years) the more I find that the continued focus on test scores hampers a lot of learning. Teaching to the test, focusing on the test, etc. , etc. are sometimes a large waste of everyone's time. In this current era do we actually need to have state testing to decide if a school is functioning? When teachers are evaluated there is not a test.
  • but meaningful (and truly personal) learning never requires technology.
    • cmanring
       
      Very true. I have polled my students and at times they feel that there is an unnatural push towards using technology. They feel that some teachers/administrators push technology just for the sake of it. This did answer my question about In The Day Of The Life entry as my student will show the example that learning does not have to require technology.
    • tracyc4
       
      Agreed. I teach band. I sometimes have kids write on worksheets, counting rhythms, or reflecting on something they played or heard. Their handwriting is terrible! They don't spend any time writing anymore, it is all done on computers. This, I believe is a true shame. Technology is great for a lot of things, but when we are losing skills because of its use, that is frightening.
  • authentic choice
    • mistermohr
       
      This is tough to implement. Students don't know intuitively how to do this on their own. There has to be coaching a feedback provided. I know that I have not implemented this to any degree of fidelity, but I am amazed at what students come up with on their own. They need to know they have that freedom, and that comes with the knowledge of how to use it.
    • kmolitor
       
      It is important for students to have the freedom to choose things that are meaningful to them. When that happens they buy into learning.
    • taylormunson
       
      I agree that this is tough to implement but I think it is a critical component. The freedom of students getting to play a key role in their own learning is so fun to watch. I am amazed when I see even a small taste of this, the difference in the students' attitudes and motivations.
    • tmolitor
       
      When students are given an actual choice, it does seem to make a world of difference in their efforts. It also seems like they are more excited for class, and sometimes even upset when the period ends.
  • “Personalized” learning is something that we do to kids; “personal” learning is something they do for themselves.
    • mistermohr
       
      I love this line! We have to help students do things for themselves. I don't know about you, but implementing this for the vast majority of students takes so much time in getting them comfortable with the desire to learn. I know, I know, I'm just trying to pass the buck onto someone that "should have taught them that". How do I do it? I need to only consider reality, it doesn't matter if they don't know how. They need to learn how, and that is where I need to focus my attention.
    • tracyc4
       
      This is a powerful distinction. Teaching kids how to do things for themselves is something that I believe is important. The kids in my school lack the intrinsic motivation to do anything, except play Minecraft. As in many initiatives in education, I think that it is not necessarily that we should make a shift from one thing to another, but how can we blend the good from all? That is, how can we blend personalization and personal learning, not just follow one or the other.
    • taylormunson
       
      Wow! This really jumped out at me. I don't think many people would acknowledge the difference between personalized and personal learning. When described like this... it really makes me think of the key distinctions that must be made. The important part is not just that we are altering our instruction to what our students like but encouraging the development of personal learning experiences and helping set our students up for successful experiences when this is done.
  • who knows each child well
    • mistermohr
       
      Who has the time for this? I say it sarcastically, but this is really a numbers game. 25 kids, 45 minutes, 90 class periods in a semester. That is 2.7 hours per student. That includes getting to know students, helping with personalization choices, decision making, monitoring learning, providing feedback, monitoring new learning, providing more feedback on dozens of standards. Our system isn't designed to foster personalized learning. We are trying to fit a square key in a round hole.
    • anonymous
       
      It's true, this is definetely a system-problem. It's one of the questions I'm hoping to answer through this course. Can these concepts be used in smaller ways and have a significant impact? They do ask a lot of us as educators.
  • Certain forms of technology can be used to support progressive education
    • mistermohr
       
      I think of this as adaptive learning. it can be a valuable resource in personalization. Going back millenia, personalization began with the socratic method from Socrates himself. He was able to adapt learning through questioning, but he didn't rely on technology. He also had groups of 10 students for extended periods of time. So maybe technology allows teachers to have a larger effective reach than without it. In today's world, do you think technology aided learning is essential?
  • She cautions educators who may be excited about the progressive educational implications for “personalized learning” to make sure everyone they work with is on the same page about what that phrase means.
    • tracyc4
       
      My school is always looking to be on the cutting edge, looking for the new shiny thing that will catch people's eyes. "Personalized Learning" is the flavor of the year this year. It is frustrating as an educator in this situation because we feel we are doing something new ALL THE TIME. Our administration has not been clear as to what it will look like for us and our kids yet. While, in theory, I think that personalized learning will have many benefits for kids, I worry about what else it is going to pile on to us teachers.
  • system of accountability in the U.S. educational system
    • kmolitor
       
      Standardized tests seem counterintuitive to innovative learning. How do we balance the two?
    • anonymous
       
      If the standardized tests are on concepts/objectives that we think all students show know/understand as they progress through school, they should be general enough that students can approach them from different ways/their own ways and still achieve the objectives.
    • tommuller4
       
      Admin is always worried about test scores and rankings but if we want to give students the freedom to learn what they want the admin may be concerned about scores.
  • Big questions, passion, personal interest are what should drive our use of technology, not the other way around.
    • kmolitor
       
      We definitely need to make sure we consider what needs to be taught first and then how can technology make it better.
    • annott
       
      Good point Kelley.
  • best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another
    • kmolitor
       
      This is so true when people have the opportunity to collaborate with one another it elevates their learning and productivity. Ideas help beget other ideas and help stimulate thoughts and create questions.
  • it implies moving away from the industrialized form of education that pumps out cookie-cutter students with the
    • taylormunson
       
      This made me think of our last forum post when we discussed the difference between "personalized and differentiation". This is what I was referring to when I said using them interchangeably doesn't necessarily work. It might... but often time personalized means student choice based and out of the ordinary.
  • For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.”
    • taylormunson
       
      If educators don't have the "true meaning" of personalized learning... is there a correct way of implementing into the classroom? Are implementation expectations meant to be just as flexible as the concept itself?
    • annott
       
      Have to admit that is what I normally do? I wonder if students would be more engaged.
  • After decades of this approach, it is clear that all children don’t learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences
    • tommuller4
       
      If we really want to teach our students we need to change the way we teach. We might need to have 3-4 different ways to teach the same topic.
  • “We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance,”
    • annott
       
      This is a very good point.
  • Our kids (and we ourselves) are suddenly walking around with access to the sum of human knowledge in our pockets and connections to literally millions of potential teachers
    • annott
       
      That is a huge change since I started teaching 26 years ago, and we still had some typewriters in the building, and maybe 3 computers.
  • content knowledge that, as we know from experience, never gets applied in real life.
    • annott
       
      I have struggled with this many times. Will they ever use this again?
rhoadsb_

ollie-afe-2019: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 0 views

  • Because the formative assessment process helps students achieve intended learning outcomes based on explicit learning progressions, teachers must first identify and then communicate the instructional goal to students.
    • alisauter
       
      The reason Learning Targets are so important to establish and communicate.
    • kmolitor
       
      Articulating goals in student friendly language is important so students know what the target is.
    • barbkfoster
       
      As our district moves forward to standards-based learning/grading, we need to change our mindset. Students need to see learning as more important that "getting a good grade'. We can help this process by sharing the learning targets with them.
    • jennham
       
      In order for the students to see that the learning is more important than the grade, educators also need to make that shift in thinking. As my son starts applying to colleges, it seems to be ALL about his grades. I know many of my sons' teachers also feel that getting a good grade is the end result. I think students as a whole would be more receptive to how much they have learned if their teachers modeled that as well.
    • annott
       
      This is where the rubric comes into play. Students need to know or see what they will be evaluated on for the final product. I really like the idea of having students create their own rubric.
  • Effective formative assessment involves collecting evidence about how student learning is progressing during the course of instruction so that necessary instructional adjustments can be made to close the gap between students’ current understanding and the desired goals. Formative assessment is not an adjunct to teaching but, rather, integrated into instruction and learning with teachers and students receiving frequent feedback.
    • alisauter
       
      People think this can be "scripted" but it really can't. Formative assessment CHANGES the teaching and learning processes to meet the needs of the learners. It is fluid.
    • mistermohr
       
      and I think it is difficult to say that formative assessment can close the gap. Imagine if classrooms waited for everyone to get something before moving on. Formative assessment is more beneficial, in my opinion, in small groups. If 90% of kids get an exit ticket correct, the class will likely move on. Even though we know that 10% don't get it.
    • jennham
       
      In an ideal situation you would move on, but the 10% would receive additional instruction in order to learn and understand what they didn't before. The trick is to find the time to do that. Every time we find time in order to make this happen it seems to get snatched up by something else that we need to do.
    • mschutjer
       
      This is something we can been discussing a great deal and whether we should include it in our grade books...with or without points and we do not give credit for formative assessments.
  • In self-assessment, students reflect on and monitor their learning using clearly explicated criteria for success.
    • alisauter
       
      I think this is harder for some kids to do than others.
    • kmolitor
       
      I agree but if we did it more and across the curriculum we could help them all become better at it.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      I find that kids are often more critical of themselves than I would be. Maybe it's false modesty, but when I've had students do a post-writing reflection or log, most of the time they think their writing is crap and they struggled more than I say in class. That is often eye opening since we think we know what happens in our classrooms, but it shouldn't be a surprise that students - like teachers - are experts at hiding their struggles.