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Matti Narkia

Super Foods: Horseradish: Protection Against Cancer and More - Life Extension - 0 views

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    "Horseradish
    Protection Against Cancer and More
    By Steve Goodman
    Horseradish: Protection Against Cancer and More

    Whether it's fighting the flu and respiratory disorders or combating tonsillitis and urinary tract infections, horseradish is a condiment that can help keep you healthy.1-3 Used to treat a wide variety of ailments over centuries, nearly every part of the horseradish plant seems to have some medicinal value. Tea made from its root has been used as an expectorant,1 while tea brewed from its flowers can be used to fight the common cold.3 A poultice can also be made of its roots to externally treat joint discomfort. In addition, raw leaves of horseradish also fulfill a purpose as a natural analgesic and, pressed against the forehead, can eliminate headache pain. Furthermore, an infusion of horseradish has known antibiotic properties,4-6 which have been proven effective against pathogenic fungi.4,5

    A perennial plant, horseradish is related to mustard, cabbage, and other cruciferous vegetables. Despite its long history as a versatile herbal remedy, however, perhaps the most interesting health benefit of horseradish is emerging from recent studies of its anticancer effects."
Matti Narkia

The Vitamin D-Antimicrobial Peptide Pathway and Its Role in Protection Against Infectio... - 1 views

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    The vitamin D-antimicrobial peptide pathway and its role in protection against infection.
    Gombart AF.
    Future Microbiol. 2009 Nov;4:1151-65.
    PMID: 19895218

    Vitamin D deficiency has been correlated with increased rates of infection. Since the early 19th century, both environmental (i.e., sunlight) and dietary sources (cod liver) of vitamin D have been identified as treatments for TB. The recent discovery that vitamin D induces antimicrobial peptide gene expression explains, in part, the 'antibiotic' effect of vitamin D and has greatly renewed interest in the ability of vitamin D to improve immune function. Subsequent work indicates that this regulation is biologically important for the response of the innate immune system to wounds and infection and that deficiency may lead to suboptimal responses toward bacterial and viral infections. The regulation of the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene is a human/primate-specific adaptation and is not conserved in other mammals. The capacity of the vitamin D receptor to act as a high-affinity receptor for vitamin D and a low-affinity receptor for secondary bile acids and potentially other novel nutritional compounds suggests that the evolutionary selection to place the cathelicidin gene under control of the vitamin D receptor allows for its regulation under both endocrine and xenobiotic response systems. Future studies in both humans and humanized mouse models will elucidate the importance of this regulation and lead to the development of potential therapeutic applications
Matti Narkia

The vitamin D-antimicrobial peptide pathway and its role in protection against infectio... - 0 views

  •  
    The vitamin D-antimicrobial peptide pathway and its role in protection against infection.
    Gombart AF.
    Future Microbiol. 2009 Nov;4:1151-65.
    PMID: 19895218
    doi:10.2217/fmb.09.87
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D Newsletter September 2009 | Vitamin D is Protective Against H1N1 Swine Flu - 0 views

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    This is an announcement to alert readers to a crucial email I received from a physician who has evidence vitamin D is protective against H1N1. I ask you, the reader, to contact your representatives in Washington to help protect Americans, especially children, from H1N1 before winter comes.
Matti Narkia

The Heart Scan Blog: The case against vitamin D2 - 0 views

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    Why would vitamin D be prescribed when vitamin D3 is available over-the-counter?

    Let's review the known differences between vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol):

    --D3 is the human form; D2 is the non-human form found in plants.

    --Dose for dose, D3 is more effective at raising blood levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D than D2. It requires roughly twice to 250% of the dose of D2 to match that of D3 (Trang H et al 1998).

    --D2 blood levels don't yield long-term sustained levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D as does D3. When examined as a 28-day area under the curve (AUC--a superior measure of biologic exposure), D3 yields better than a 300% increased potency compared to D2. This means that it requires around 50,000 units D2 to match the effects of 15,000 units D3 (Armas LA et al 2004).

    --D2 has lower binding affinity for vitamin D-binding protein, compared to D3

    --Mitochondrial vitamin D 25-hydroxylase converts D3 to the 25-hydroxylated form five times more rapidly than D2.

    --As we age, the ability to metabolize D2 is dramatically reduced, while D3 is not subject to this phenomenon
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