Skip to main content

Home/ Nutrition/ Group items tagged drinks

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Matti Narkia

Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adipo... - 0 views

  •  
    Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans.
    Stanhope KL, Schwarz JM, Keim NL, Griffen SC, Bremer AA, Graham JL, Hatcher B, Cox CL, Dyachenko A, Zhang W, McGahan JP, Seibert A, Krauss RM, Chiu S, Schaefer EJ, Ai M, Otokozawa S, Nakajima K, Nakano T, Beysen C, Hellerstein MK, Berglund L, Havel PJ.
    J Clin Invest. 2009 May;119(5):1322-34. Epub 2009 Apr 20.
    PMID: 19381015
    doi: 10.1172/JCI37385.

    Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10% during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle-triglyceride and -cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults.
Matti Narkia

Fructose tied to higher blood pressure: study | Health | Reuters - 0 views

  •  
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A diet high in a form of sugar found in sweetened soft drinks and junk food raises blood pressure among men, according to research likely to mean more bad news for beverage companies and restaurant chains.

    One of two studies released on Wednesday provided the first evidence that fructose helps raise blood pressure. It also found that the drug allopurinol, used to treat gout, can alleviate the effect by reducing uric acid levels in the body.

    The second study, which measured fructose intake in mice, suggested that people who consume junk foods and sweetened soft drinks at night could gain weight faster than those who don't.
Matti Narkia

Causes of disturbances in acid-base balance - Acid-base balance, dentinogenesis and den... - 0 views

  •  
    The most common imbalance in the acid-base balance in the industrialized countries is mild chronic metabolic acidosis caused by the diet rich in the animal protein. Proteins are metabolized to organic acids. The typical American diet produces after metabolism approximately 100 meq of acid every day (Barzel 1995). This kind of a diet has been proved to cause aciduria and calciuria as a consequence of acidosis and thus a loss of total calcium of the body (Breslau et al. 1988, Schuette et al. 1980, Licata et al. 1981). Cola drinks that contain phosphoric acid are another acidosis-inducing ingredient of diet, especially among young people (Barzel 1995).
Matti Narkia

The Last Psychiatrist: Just How Many Drinks A Day Is Bad? - 0 views

  •  
    Is a glass or two of wine a day good for you? You would think this would be an easy question to answer, but it's not, and that's because of this:

    How many glasses of wine are in a bottle?

    If you answered 4-5, continue reading. Because guess what? Apparently the answer is eight. No, I'm not kidding. Yes, they are serious. Unplug your monitor and ram it into your skull as hard as you can.
Matti Narkia

Study Links Diet Soft Drinks With Cardiac Risk | LiveScience - 0 views

  •  
    Drinking more than one soda a day -- even if it's the sugar-free diet kind -- is associated with an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors linked to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, a study finds
Matti Narkia

Nine Green Teas to Explore - 0 views

  •  
    Americans are learning, from Dr. Weil and others, that green tea - a drink made from the unoxidized leaf of the Camellia sinensis plant - is wonderfully healthy. The most important polyphenol in tea is EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate), a potent antioxidant
1 - 6 of 6
Showing 20 items per page