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Martin Burrett

Some children can 'recover' from autism, but problems often remain - 1 views

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    "Research in the past several years has shown that children can outgrow a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), once considered a lifelong condition. In a new study, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health Systemhave found that the vast majority of such children still have difficulties that require therapeutic and educational support. The study was published online today in the Journal of Child Neurology."
Martin Burrett

Pupils with autism twice as likely to be bullied - what can teachers do? - 0 views

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    "In the UK, there are about 100,000 children with autism - about one in 100 - according to the NHS and 70% are educated in mainstream schools. Learning and socialising with neurotypical children can pose a challenge for pupils with autism who find it hard to read facial expressions and body language and have difficulties understanding the intentions of their peers. They may also prefer to play alone which sets them up as targets in the playground, with other children finding it easier to pick on them as they do not have a support structure around them."
Martin Burrett

Children with autism thrive in mainstream pre-schools - 0 views

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    "In a world first, breakthrough research from La Trobe University has shown that toddlers with autism are just as capable of learning important life skills through early-intervention delivered in mainstream pre-schools as in specialised settings. Over a period of three years, 44 children aged between 15 and 32 months were randomly assigned to classrooms that included only children with autism or to classrooms with typically developing peers."
C CC

News: The Exclusion of Autistic Children | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Educ... - 1 views

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    New campaign to stop the exclusion of pupils with Autism
C CC

Book Review: The Little Book of The Autism Spectrum | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UK... - 3 views

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    A great book full of information for those wanting to understand Autism
Vicki Davis

Sue Basko, Lawyer for Music and Film: Cyberstalker Attack! - 3 views

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    Here is Sue Basko's site about Liz. One point I want to make here is that it could be that Liz's article did in fact inspire cyberstalking against Sue. It does not, however, mean Liz is a cyberstalker. One person hating Liz also does not mean it is true. There are people who have defended me in situations against those who are unkind but I had nothing to do with it. There is a lot more here than a simple to understand interaction. Also, perhaps, it would have been easier for Sue to say that she was wrong when she got out of field and made inflammatory comments hurting those with autism (saying they were claiming it just to get money --- in a way that was insensitive, in my opinion) In all of this, as you look at the interaction there is the surface story but also the fact that with social media and thousands of bystanders watching our interactions that such convoluted scenarios will emerge.
Vicki Davis

Some thoughts on blogging and copyright, trademark, cyberstalking and more - I Speak of... - 7 views

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    It is unfortunate that controversy is surrounding autism and yet it is something misunderstood by many. Here is an article on Liz Ditz's blog going back to an issue that arose in December when she quoted a person's Facebook who then denied the posting and accused Liz of hacking the account and writing the comments herself. I am not on the inside of this but am watching as the outcome has implications for my own thoughts of digital citizenship. I am just saddened any time a person is taken of a mission to help others because of flame wars and it doesn't look like this one is going to stop soon. All I know is I have been reading Liz's blog for quite some time and although I don't know her personally, I find the charges leveled against her doubtful from what I do know.
Ed Webb

Tenured Radical - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 3 views

  • there is little to no attention being paid to giving full-time faculty the training to teach students who have a wide range of capacities when it comes to what counts for normal classroom discipline:  sitting still for an hour and taking notes, being in crowded rooms where they risk being bumped and touched, overcoming obsessive behavior to get to class or hand in a paper on time, working in small groups with other students, or being in large classes with crowds of strangers.  It is also happening in a context in which being full-time faculty is becoming anomalous, and the financial “flexibility” of running higher education on per-course labor makes it unlikely that the vast majority of faculty will be eligible, or open to making unpaid time available, for the training that would make their classrooms accessible to autistic students
  • People with autism, Gilman notes, also tend to have disordered sleep, affecting the capacity to function at high-stress times of the semester when we assume that most students are pulling all-nighters.  They have difficulty relating to someone they are intimate with (much less an impatient, overworked faculty member who wants all students to act like the adults they appear to be), what they are experiencing and what is wrong, which would make even the most generous office hours not useful. So when we are putting together arguments for hiring full-time faculty in the next round of budget cuts and declarations from foundations that tenure is holding us back, think about adding this one in.  The demands on faculty to be well-trained, knowledgeable, creative and flexible teachers are growing — not subsiding — and attention to this will make all the difference in keeping our classrooms truly inclusive
  • colleges and universities don't have the infrastructure to replicate what these students have relied upon in high school
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  • please don't generalize from specific autistic traits to all the students on the spectrum. Our autistic daughter isn't a visual learner, she's a voracious reader. Still, the number of times people have assumed that she learns in a visual or tactile way, in the style of Temple Grandin? Too many to count.
  • a good first step would be to listen to autistic undergraduates themselves and to put the needs they express first instead of responding primarily to the perspective of the neurotypical parents of autistic children. The perspective of autistic undergraduates, which seems to me to be the most important on the subject, is entirely missing from this post
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