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Vicki Davis

Why Burned Out Teachers Are Quitting Their Jobs - 3 views

  • Overall, nearly three in 10 teachers surveyed said it's likely or very likely that they'll leave the profession in the next year.
Vicki Davis

Impact of Educational Technology on Teacher Stress and Anxiety: A Literature Review - PMC - 1 views

  • However, for teachers this is not usually the case. Incorporating technology into their teaching practices without being aware of the didactic possibilities that technology offers, a lack of training in educational technology, or resistance to its use produces fatigue in the professional and working environments
  • “burnout syndrome”, which is related to exhaustion and burnout due to increasing demands
  • In the pedagogical context, burnout syndrome in teachers can affect their level of commitment at work.
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    "The main findings show that teachers present high levels of anxiety or stress due to their use of educational technology in the classroom. Among the conclusions, the need for research on different strategies to prevent the emergence of these anxiety and stress symptoms in teachers stands out."
Vicki Davis

More Than $1 Billion in K-12 Ed-Tech Licensing Fees Go to Waste - Market Brief - 0 views

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    A significant percentage of edtech licenses go to waste.
Ed Webb

What Cliff? Data and the Destruction of Public Higher Ed | Just Visiting - 1 views

  • That higher education institutions are facing a “demographic cliff” in the coming years has become conventional wisdom. But what if there is no cliff? What if we’ve instead been subjected to a narrative rooted in limited data that serves the interests of corporations and is doing real damage to our public institutions?
  • Currently, the NCES projects relatively constant numbers of high school graduates through 2030, with total graduates expected to increase in the mid-2020s, followed by a modest decline, making the projected 2029–30 number slightly greater than in 2016–17. Further, it is important to note that since the 1970s, the total number of high school graduates in the U.S. has declined several times before. More importantly for higher education, the NCES projects modest increases in higher education enrollments through 2029.
  • WICHE is an interest group with an explicit policy agenda—“focus areas”—which includes “developing and supporting innovations in technology and beyond that improve the quality of postsecondary education and reduce costs.”
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  • The purported demographic crisis is being used around the country to fundamentally remake higher education. For example, this is the main argument being advanced by Republicans in the Wisconsin Legislature seeking to radically reshape the University of Wisconsin system. This plan calls for the significant expansion of online education, regionalization of the comprehensive campuses, increased campus specialization and program consolidation and elimination, among other long-standing priorities.
  • The current context of higher education provides fertile ground for the uncritical acceptance of the demographic cliff. Higher education enrollments have declined since reaching historic highs in 2010. And decades of political decisions have made higher education tuition-driven, one state budget cycle at a time. We are vulnerable to the demographic cliff framing because of the politically imposed financial crunch in which we exist. Enrollments dictate everything we do.
  • the demographic cliff is an austerity-driven narrative that assumes that public funding will never—and should never—come back
  • Programs must be eliminated, online education must be expanded and, if necessary, even entire campuses must be closed. Higher education must be agile because tax increases are off the table, even as stock markets reach new highs and the income and wealth of the highest earners skyrockets. The interests of corporations and the wealthy will dictate public policy.
  • official population and education data—which come with no political assumptions, narrative or products for sale—show a slowly increasing population, including higher education enrollments, in the coming years.
  • demographic cliff is a manufactured crisis
  • takes advantage of a tuition-dependent higher education system to implement even greater austerity while imposing an education policy agenda that could never be adopted through normal political means
Ed Webb

Kids who grew up with search engines could change STEM education forever - The Verge - 6 views

  • it may also be that in an age where every conceivable user interface includes a search function, young people have never needed folders or directories for the tasks they do
  • While many of today’s professors grew up without search functions on their phones and computers, today’s students increasingly don’t remember a world without them
  • though directory structures exist on every computer (as well as in environments like Google Drive), today’s iterations of macOS and Windows do an excellent job of hiding them
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  • the issue is likely not that modern students are learning fewer digital skills, but rather that they’re learning different ones
  • STEM educators are increasingly taking on dual roles: those of instructors not only in their field of expertise but in computer fundamentals as well.
  • Directory structure isn’t just unintuitive to students — it’s so intuitive to professors that they have difficulty figuring out how to explain it.
Felix Gryffeth

Instead of fighting over student debt forgiveness, politicians should focus on an even ... - 1 views

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    ", rather than providing a blanket discharge without context for personal decisions or need."
Vicki Davis

Bootstrap - 1 views

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    Lesson plans for Algebra, Physics, and CS
Ed Webb

Bill Maher vs. higher ed | Bryan Alexander - 0 views

  • First, Maher gets certain things wrong, and many people share those errors, so addressing them might be beneficial. Second, several of his criticisms point to more broadly held American attitudes.  Better understanding them can help higher ed as it tries to navigate an increasingly challenging battle for public support.
  • Accurately, he points out that published prices have risen faster than inflation for a generation. However, setting aside the reasons for that inflation, this misses two key points. First, the tuition amounts cited are published prices, not what institutions actually charge most students.  Widespread tuition discounting means only the richest tend to pay full price, which subsidizes everyone else, who pay less.
  • ignoring the wide range of low cost colleges and universities
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  • Maher gets some points dead right, like the general – and especially Democratic – idea that everyone should get some post-secondary schooling.  This is still the default American idea, with persistent popularity.
  • not all of higher ed is about those teenagers, and it’s a mistake to assume it is
  • Ignoring these swarms of campuses with low (sticker!) prices in favor of complaining about the most expensive slice of American academia is, alas, a popular mistake.
  • He wants the college and university sector to shrink back in size and influence.  He advises an end to college for all, wanting instead college for even fewer.
  • Maher reminds us of the power of economic populism, and not just in the ways Trump mobilized it. Academia’s sometimes intention of mitigating inequality runs smack into our role in making inequality happen
  • to whatever extent Bill Maher is representative, the public has woeful gaps in its understanding of how higher ed works.  Our elite institutions stand in for the entire sector too often. Our high tuition, high discount strategy just looks like very high tuition.  Adult learners are nowhere near visible enough.
  • the cost of today’s education is likely to be somewhat higher than what I paid 30 years ago, but the price is definitely dramatically higher because today’s students aren’t enjoying the taxpayer support that I did. The price went up for sure. How much the cost went up is less clear
Martin Burrett

Webinar: Supporting Special Needs Students with eBooks & Audiobooks - 1 views

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    In this webinar, expert in eBooks Meredith Wemhoff discusses ways to engage and support learners with special needs using eBooks and audio. Using the case-study of an independent all-boys school located in Surrey, the school provides special needs students an opportunity to succeed and thrive. Many arrive to the 80-year-old institution with low self-confidence, often due to struggles they faced in traditional educational institutions caused by learning and language difficulties. This means providing a collection that meets the individual learning needs of the school's 470 students, who range in age from 8-18. ​​​​​​​ During this eye-opening webinar, Meredith will share the story of selecting, launching and promoting a digital library service that helps address learning challenges. Attendees will come away with best practices for bringing ebooks and audiobooks to their school and real-life examples of these practices in action. Don't miss out, register today!
Martin Burrett

UKEdChat Conference: Certified Professional Development Course - 0 views

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    This online Certified Professional Development Course encourages delegates to engage, reflect and interact with (at least) 6 presentations during (or after) the conference, considering the impact the showcase could have on your own professional practice.
Martin Burrett

Live Well, Learn Well - 1 views

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    Watch #UKEdChat After Hours with teacher and author Abbie Mann. She discusses with Martin Burrett about #Wellbeing and her new book, Live Well, Learn Well.
Martin Burrett

UKEdChat 2021 Free Online Conference - 0 views

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    Huge free online Educational conference
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