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C CC

Activity Passport Bookmark - UKEdChat - 1 views

C CC

Session 227: How to get Children Reading for Pleasure | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #... - 5 views

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    A list of books curated by teachers which have helped get children into reading books for pleasure
C CC

Session 227: How to get Children Reading for Pleasure | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #... - 1 views

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    Teacher discussion summary and archive full of ideas to get children reading for pleasure
C CC

News: Students Excel at Problem Solving - 4 views

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    OECD Figures
C CC

Children's Prized Possessions - 3 views

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    A great set of images showing the prized possessions of children. Great discussion stimulus.
C CC

Video Games help Children's Attention, Multi-tasking and Eyesight | UKEdChat.com - Supp... - 5 views

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    Interesting Research
C CC

Hard-Hitting Second a Day Video | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Com... - 5 views

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    Video pointing out the challenges to children in Syria
C CC

News: The Exclusion of Autistic Children | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Educ... - 1 views

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    New campaign to stop the exclusion of pupils with Autism
Brendan Murphy

Is technology sapping children's creativity? - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post - 3 views

  • Kids need first-hand engagement — they need to manipulate objects physically, engage all their senses, and move and interact with the 3-dimensional world.
  • Play is a remarkably creative process
    • Brendan Murphy
       
      This is the first time I've heard of video games as not play. 
  • This is profoundly different from a child having an original idea to make or do something
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  • studies might show that children can learn specific facts or skills by playing interactive games
  • not be fooled into thinking this kind of learning is significant or foundational.
  • but still not grasp the underlying concepts of number.
    • Brendan Murphy
       
      Concepts and skills are two different things
Brendan Murphy

Power to Preschoolers: making Hungry Guppy, a fun math game | Motion Math - Play with n... - 0 views

  • focus on shape instead of number
  • it wasn’t clear that preschoolers really understood “winning” or “losing”
  • the University of Missouri correlates 1st and 5th grade math skills, controlling for IQ and socio-economic lev
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  • just hand them the iPad, keep our mouths shut
  • Testing out Hungry Guppy
  • n addition to being at a different cognitive level, younger children lack fine-motor skills,
Ed Webb

What's Wrong With the Teenage Mind? - WSJ.com - 19 views

  • Adolescence has always been troubled, but for reasons that are somewhat mysterious, puberty is now kicking in at an earlier and earlier age. A leading theory points to changes in energy balance as children eat more and move less.
  • Recent studies in the neuroscientist B.J. Casey's lab at Cornell University suggest that adolescents aren't reckless because they underestimate risks, but because they overestimate rewards—or, rather, find rewards more rewarding than adults do. The reward centers of the adolescent brain are much more active than those of either children or adults. Think about the incomparable intensity of first love, the never-to-be-recaptured glory of the high-school basketball championship. What teenagers want most of all are social rewards, especially the respect of their peers. In a recent study by the developmental psychologist Laurence Steinberg at Temple University, teenagers did a simulated high-risk driving task while they were lying in an fMRI brain-imaging machine. The reward system of their brains lighted up much more when they thought another teenager was watching what they did—and they took more risks.
  • What happens when children reach puberty earlier and adulthood later? The answer is: a good deal of teenage weirdness. Fortunately, developmental psychologists and neuroscientists are starting to explain the foundations of that weirdness.
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  • contemporary children have very little experience with the kinds of tasks that they'll have to perform as grown-ups. Children have increasingly little chance to practice even basic skills like cooking and caregiving. Contemporary adolescents and pre-adolescents often don't do much of anything except go to school. Even the paper route and the baby-sitting job have largely disappeared.
  • This control system depends much more on learning. It becomes increasingly effective throughout childhood and continues to develop during adolescence and adulthood, as we gain more experience. You come to make better decisions by making not-so-good decisions and then correcting them. You get to be a good planner by making plans, implementing them and seeing the results again and again. Expertise comes with experience.
  • first with the industrial revolution and then even more dramatically with the information revolution, children have come to take on adult roles later and later. Five hundred years ago, Shakespeare knew that the emotionally intense combination of teenage sexuality and peer-induced risk could be tragic—witness "Romeo and Juliet." But, on the other hand, if not for fate, 13-year-old Juliet would have become a wife and mother within a year or two.
  • Wide-ranging, flexible and broad learning, the kind we encourage in high-school and college, may actually be in tension with the ability to develop finely-honed, controlled, focused expertise in a particular skill, the kind of learning that once routinely took place in human societies. For most of our history, children have started their internships when they were seven, not 27
  • experience shapes the brain. People often think that if some ability is located in a particular part of the brain, that must mean that it's "hard-wired" and inflexible. But, in fact, the brain is so powerful precisely because it is so sensitive to experience. It's as true to say that our experience of controlling our impulses make the prefrontal cortex develop as it is to say that prefrontal development makes us better at controlling our impulses. Our social and cultural life shapes our biology.
Claude Almansi

CEC | Ask Arne: A Conversation with the Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC) Member... - 0 views

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    "As I have travelled across the country visiting schools and classrooms and talking with teachers and parents, I have heard many questions about our plans at the U.S. Department of Education to support children with disabilities, their families, and the teachers who educate them and fight for them daily. To hear more about the issues affecting students with disabilities and their teachers, I asked CEC to contact members through an e-mail blast. Your response was overwhelming. Though CEC received more questions than we could possibly answer here, I have worked with your leadership to identify some of the central questions for educators of children with disabilities, and I have worked with my staff at the Department so that we can address them in this document. I would like to thank CEC members and all teachers of children with disabilities for their outstanding compassion and commitment and for the range of complex skills and talents you bring to teaching your students every day."
Fred Delventhal

The Kid Should See This. - 21 views

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    The Kid Should See This. There's just so much science, nature, music, arts, technology, storytelling and assorted good stuff out there that my kids (and maybe your kids) haven't seen. It's most likely not stuff that was made for them... But we don't underestimate kids around here.
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