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Home/ Diigo In Education/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by Martin Leicht

Contents contributed and discussions participated by Martin Leicht

Martin Leicht

Distracted Minds: 3 Ways to Get Their Attention in Class - 11 views

  • Attention is reciprocal.
  • The more distracted I am in my interactions with you, the less likely you are to give me your full attention.
  • importance of having students share their strengths and values with you at the beginning of a semester
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - Everyone is their own individual and bring a lot to your class. The more you know about them, the better chance you can find out how to motivate them.
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  • Recognize their individuality
  • The researchers also asked students whether it mattered to them that the instructors knew their names, and more than 85 percent of them said it did
  • because making good use of the full physical space of a classroom is one of the most straightforward ways to keep both professor and students attentive.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - I taught from the back. We showed a lot of videos and did demonstrations. So, it was easy to "teach" from the back. ON ZOOM - how do you teach from the back of the class?
  • One advantage of the Zoom classes that many of us are teaching right now is that the names are all right there on the screen
  • Speak to all corners of the room
  • They bring their unique life stories and experiences, which can help provide new perspectives on familiar questions and challenges.
  • Tell you about an important value
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - Maybe it doesn't need to be all writing? Maybe it can be images and audio or video recordings to accompany them.
  • Tell you about a unique perspective or life experience
  • Describe their greatest academic strength
  • The obvious solution here is to break that barrier
  • Use their names regularly.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - Notoriety means power or maybe at least the power to capture their attention.
  • She encourages children first to recognize and write their own names and then to compare the letters and syllables in their own names with those of the other names on the grid
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - Author's previous post about CLOSE READING. Really spend some time on the name.
  • What is most deserving of our attention in the classroom, of course, are the other human beings in our presence
Martin Leicht

Distracted Minds: Why You Should Teach Like a Poet - 4 views

  • Routine is a great deadener of attention.
  • When you follow the same routines at home, folding the laundry or doing the dishes, your mind goes on automatic pilot.
  • same generic suite of teaching activities: listen to a lecture, take notes, ask some questions, talk in groups.
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  • Be astonished.
  • Pay attention.
  • Through the creative turns of language they use to describe the world and our experiences, the familiar becomes unfamiliar again, and we discover in the everyday world fresh food for insight and reflection.
  • We want them to pay attention to course content, to be astonished by what they find there, and to report back to us and the world what they have discovered.
  • Find an everyday object that connects to your discipline, or a photograph or image that accompanies an article or book in your field.
  • Close — and I mean really close — reading.
  • in which practitioners slowly read the sacred scriptures of Judaism aloud to one another, pausing and discussing and questioning at every turn.
  • Tell about it.
  • asked what they had learned from the experience, and especially what they had noticed about the text that they hadn’t perceived before
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Metacognition exercise of sorts?
  • Engagement with objects.
  • pointed out anomalies and inconsistencies, and wondered
  • What? For the first step, students spend time just observing the object and taking notes.
  • So what? Students write down questions based on their observations and share them with one another.
  • Now what? The final stage shifts into more whole-class and teacher-centered discussion
  • Attention through assessments.
  • For 13 consecutive weeks, she asked students to leave the campus and make a visit to the nearby Worcester Art Museum in order to spend time in front of the same work of art.
  • As they learned to train their attention on a work of art, their attention brought them insights. They saw more clearly, developed new ideas, and wrote creatively about what they observed.
  •  
    Could some or all of this work online to build engagement? 1) close reading 2) engage with objects 3) attention through assessments
Martin Leicht

Treehouse teaching and laundry art: Educators find creative ways to reach kids - 5 views

  • was also concerned about her students’ lack of engagement — so few were completing the assignments she emailed to parents
  • Playing with her family’s laundry marked the first time Maliah seemed happy — actually happy — since the start of the pandemic.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - happy - happy is good. Happy kids want to learn or are more likely to learn.
  • Nobody should ever be penalized or put at a disadvantage for the supplies they don’t have,” Dillingham thought to herself. “But everyone’s got laundry!”
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  • Clark started an online fundraiser to pay for bikes. He raised more than $10,000, and neighbors donated dozens of bikes and helmets for the rides.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - a little digital citizenship too mixed in with online fund raising.
  • She couldn’t be sure whether her kids were uninterested or whether they lacked the necessary pens, paper and crayons at home.
  • He decided he would take his students on socially distanced bike rides across the city. “It was a leap of faith. I got extremely nervous. I was trying to find a way to connect with kids,” Clark said.
  • her young students are musical detectives, in search of learning. She teaches most grade levels and the school chorus.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - musical detectives searching for music.
  • t he’s found other ways to keep his students engaged and cycling the city. He invited students to a weekly entrepreneurship class for which they rode their bikes uptown from Dunbar to the gym where Clark works, Sweat DC. The students met with the owner of the gym and the owners of a nearby bar, Hook Hall, and the bagel shop Call Your Mother Deli to learn what it takes to run a business.
  • She wanted them to create their own composition, their own snowy-day song.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - used flipgrid for this
  • When Clark wanted to teach them about resilience, he took them through the hilly streets of Georgetown.
  • In lessons for older students, some days there were makeshift drums involved or recorders that students had taken home.
  • she was able to use the treehouse as a key part of her lessons.
  • She lugged a bookshelf, desk and heater into the 5-by-7-foot space, and ran an Ethernet cable from the house so she’d have Internet.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - properly set up
  • before climbing into what passes for her classroom in 2020: her daughters’ decade-old treehouse.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - different locals - maybe something with changing backgrounds.
  • So as one class studied architecture this fall, Daney, 54, encouraged them to walk in their neighborhood to take photos of houses of different styles: ranch, colonial, Victorian.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - use what you have around you.
  • nd he stuck with his usual method of helping students learn about the design process, asking them to prepare a meal. They started with ideas and research, made a plan, carried it out and evaluated it. The result: soups and pastas and pastries.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - edTech class on engineering and design
  • Kids need connection, he said. “I think they’re starving for conversation,” including with adults.
  • In fifth grade, students are expected to learn how to add, subtract, multiply and divide with whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Through a computer application the students have, they can program the robot to move a certain distance, stop, maybe even turn.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - use a robot or technology to achieve the same result.
  • With learning all-virtual, he packs a big Ziploc bag — for each student, each quarter — with things like fishing line, foam board, pipecleaners, magnets, Popsicle sticks and rubber bands. Whatever they will need for their projects.
  • And a lot of the math is a little sneaky. They think they are trying to get the robot to move, when they are actually measuring the angles to get it to move.”  
  • Others complete their math problems directly on the computer, which can lead to some troubles as they try to show their work.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - will share screen be viable.
  • When Kristin Gavaza interviewed for the music teacher position at Dorothy I. Height Elementary in the summer, she told the principal she had some ideas for how to create a festive concert while students were scattered and learning from home.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      NOTE - picture references a complete teacher set up of a large screen and standing desk. Sure, she's video editing yet the concept carries to teaching class too.
  •  
    Numerous creative examples to how educators promoted learning on line and worked to build engagement.
Martin Leicht

A Breakthrough for A.I. Technology: Passing an 8th-Grade Science Test - The New York Times - 13 views

  • But others, like this question from the same exam, required logic:
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Why do we still test rote memory? Why do not more tests in involve logical choices?
  • A science test isn’t something that can be mastered just by learning rules. It requires making connections using logic
  • “We can’t compare this technology to real human students and their ability to reason,”
    • Martin Leicht
       
      And yet, AI continues to improve/make logical connections. What are we doing to help keep students improving?
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  • The new research could lead to systems that can carry on a decent conversation.
  • the world’s leading A.I. labs have built elaborate neural networks that can learn the vagaries of language by analyzing articles and books written by humans.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      This was an improvement. Before, they showed AI thousands upon thousands of photos of dogs. In the end, AI can recognise a dog.
  • Bert learned how to guess the missing word in a sentence.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Bert (from Google) learned to fill in these missing words by analysing thousands of pages of wikipedia and online books. Bert soaked up so much with so little effort. Never send a Human to do a robots job.
Martin Leicht

How Google Interferes With Its Search Algorithms and Changes Your Results - WSJ - 17 views

  • a shift from its founding philosophy of “organizing the world’s information,” to one that is far more active in deciding how that information should appear.
  • Google keeps blacklists to remove certain sites or prevent others from surfacing in certain types of results. These moves are separate from those that block sites as required by U.S. or foreign law,
  • Far from being autonomous computer programs oblivious to outside pressure, Google’s algorithms are subject to regular tinkering from executives and engineers who are trying to deliver relevant search results, while also pleasing a wide variety of powerful interests and driving its parent company’s more than $30 billion in annual profit.
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  • Google made more than 3,200 changes to its algorithms in 2018, up from more than 2,400 in 2017 and from about 500 in 2010
  • testing showed wide discrepancies in how Google handled auto-complete queries and some of what Google calls organic search results
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Alternatives - Microsoft's BING - DuckDuckGo and Yahoo. check them out when you get time
  • Google said 15% of queries today are for words, or combinations of words, that the company has never seen before, putting more demands on engineers to make sure the algorithms deliver useful results.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      How do you connect your post/content to future searches? Tagging only gets you so far. Thus, Google "tinkers" with the algorithm to product "the best" results. Interesting & concerning!
  • ALGORITHMS ARE effectively recipes in code form, providing step-by-step instructions for how computers should solve certain problems. They drive not just the internet, but the apps that populate phones and tablets.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Yet, we never (almost never) eat the same thing (recipe) twice in a day. We indulge ourselves with comfort food, yes. And we seek out new taste sensations.
Martin Leicht

Leaders Don't Hide Behind Data - 6 views

    • Martin Leicht
       
      Staying busy is not the same as being productive.
  • A/B testing is a trap because it insulates us from A/J testing. A/B testing is an asymptotic stroll toward a local maximum.
  • And busyness is a trap because it allows us to believe that we’ve actually created value.
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  • What you’re not doing is inspiring your team to level up. What you’re not doing is inventing a new game. Instead, you’re playing someone else’s game.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Creating a mechanics, dynamics, & aesthetics (game) comes with risk(s). And one can understand why we stick to creating value and management.
  • There are two traps
  • First, it’s easier than ever to do A/B testing
  • Second, it’s easier to stay busy.
  • Leadership is the art of doing things you’re not sure of, and doing them with enrollment instead of authority.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Leadership = uncertainty + enrolment.
  • On the other hand, leadership is voluntary. Those who follow you must be enrolled in your journey and persuaded to follow (and contribute to) your vision.
  • Digital charisma doesn’t feel like management, and it requires alternative channels. Human channels. Channels that involve actually showing up, not hiding behind a system.
  • how can you possibly listen back?
    • Martin Leicht
       
      How do we listen back?
  • We can learn quite a bit from how the modern cultural leaders of Instagram and Facebook use their platform, despite so many of their habits we’d prefer to avoid.
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Through FB and IG modern cultural leaders affect change because they have "chosen" to do so. Not because anyone game them the authority. They chose to tell a different story.
Martin Leicht

Opinion | Steve Jobs Was Right: Smartphones and Tablets Killed the P.C. - The New York ... - 6 views

    • Martin Leicht
       
      Would like to know more about "productivity dream machines."
  • they’re productivity dream machines
  • keyboard is better and more durable
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  • Among other things, I now research and write just about every column using an iPad (I still compose many first drafts by speaking into my headphones, but I’m an odd duck).
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Speaking a draft into the headphones, wow, talk about visualization of things? Can you see the draft in your head?
  • Jobs declared the iPad to be the future of computing. “PCs are going to be like trucks,”
  • Like a phone, in most scenarios I find the iPad to be faster, more portable and easier to use and maintain than any traditional P.C. I’ve ever owned.
  • The iPad still can’t do everything a laptop can, and I still have to log in to a “real” computer sometimes.
  • the iPad doesn’t work with antiquated work flows that are built for PCs
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