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smilex3md

Traditional Education Beats Online in Key Areas, Opinion Poll Finds - Wired Campus - Th... - 25 views

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    Gallup Poll on American's views of online courses: Mixed - "online instruction is at least as good as classroom-based courses in terms of providing good value, a format most students can succeed in, and instruction tailored to each individual. But they question the rigor of testing and grading, and whether employees will view such degrees positively..."
Sasha Thackaberry

Loyal, but in Which Direction? - On Hiring - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 17 views

  • the loyalty that institutions show, or fail to show, to the people who work for them—particularly the part-time faculty.
  • Those of us who serve on hiring committees, it seems to me, often face similar dilemmas. How much loyalty do we owe those individuals who have served us faithfully as part-time faculty members, in many cases for years? Should we give preference to them because of that, as many posters on this blog have suggested? Or should we try to hire the best people possible, whether or not they’ve worked for us?
  • So what happens when some of our own adjuncts apply for tenure-track positions, and we determine that, in our professional judgment, they’re not as qualified or just not as good as other applicants? Do we owe it to them to hire them anyway? To the extent that they’ve shown loyalty to the department by working there all those years for meager wages, do we have a moral obligation to show them loyalty in return by offering them tenure-track jobs when available?
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • I confess that, as a former department chair and serial search-committee member, I usually lean toward giving our adjuncts the nod, occasionally over people who seem more qualified on paper. I know those adjuncts personally, I know their commitment to the department, and I believe they will make fine full-time faculty members—and they usually do. I believe that we do owe them some degree of loyalty because of all they’ve done.
Joy Robinson

Your Unofficial Job-Application Checklist - Manage Your Career - The Chronicle of Highe... - 1 views

    • Joy Robinson
       
      annotated and illustrated CV. Great idea!
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    "With more than 4,000 colleges and universities out there, no generalization about how academic employers view s"
Rich Robles

Developing an Effective Teaching Portfolio - On Hiring - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 2 views

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    A job seeker stops looking at requests for "evidence of teaching effectiveness" as a hurdle and learns to make the most of them. 
Jill Van Wyke

Admissions Web Pages: Leer en Español - 7 views

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    Pa. college translate admissions Web pages into Spanish to aid Latino parents. The reader comments on the story are interesting.
Jill Van Wyke

Some Things Never Get Old - 82 views

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    A college professor on five things he never tires of telling his students about writing.
Karen Balnis

Another Look at the Weaknesses of Online Learning - Innovations - The Chronicle of High... - 86 views

shared by Karen Balnis on 28 Jul 11 - No Cached
  • have been lucky enough to have taught the full range of our freshman / sophmore undergraduate offerings as both an onsite and online instructor. While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:1. While in the onsite classroom you have the opportunity to think on your feet and challenge and be experiential on your feet to reactions to the students who speak, in the online classroom, you are able to meet *every* class member and challenge their minds and ideas. The students who would normally be lost in a classroom of 35-40 are met and developed each day or week at their level and pushed to consider ideas they might not have considered. 2. I am able to reach the entire class through multimedia exhibits in each of the weekly units - journal articles, non-copyrighted film clips (and many from our university's purchased collection under an agreement for both onsite classroom and online classroom use), photography, art, patents, etc, that the students would not see - or would otherwise ignore - in an onsite classroom. We incorporate this information into our discussions and make it part of the larger whole of history.3. Each student and I - on the phone during office hours or in e-mail - discuss the creation of their term papers - and discuss midterm and final "anxiety" issues - and as they are used to the online format, and regular communication with me through the discussion boards, they respond much more readily than onsite students, whom I have found I have to pressure to talk to me. 4. I am able to accommodate students from around the country - and around the world. I have had enrolled in my class students from Japan, Indonesia, India, England - and many other countries. As a result, I have set up a *very* specific Skype address *only* for use of my students. They are required to set up the time and day with me ahead of time and I need to approve that request, but for them (and for some of my students scattered all over the state and US), the face time is invaluable in helping them feel "connected" - and I am more than happy to offer it. 5. As the software upgrades, the possibilities of what I can offer become more and more amazing, and the ease of use for both me - and for the students -  becomes astronomically better. Many have never known the software, so they don't notice it - but those who have taken online courses before cheer it on. Software does not achieve backwards. As very few of these issues are met by the onsite classroom, I am leaning more and more toward the online classroom as the better mode of instruction. Yes, there are times I *really* miss the onsite opportunities, but then I think of the above distinctions and realize that yes, I am where I should be, and virtually *ALL* the students are getting far more for their money than they would get in an onsite classroom. This is the wave of the future, and it holds such amazing promise. Already I think we are seeing clear and fruitful results, and if academics receive effective - and continuing - instruction and support from the very beginning, I cannot imagine why one would ever go back. The only reason I can think of *not* doing this is if the instructor has his or her *own* fear of computers. Beyond that - please, please jump on the bandwagon, swallow your fears, and learn how to do this with vigor. I don't think you will ever be sorry.PhD2BinUS
  • have been lucky enough to have taught the full range of our freshman / sophmore undergraduate offerings as both an onsite and online instructor. While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:
  • While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:
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    I am a graduate student at Sam Houston State University and before I started grad school I never had taken an online course before. My opinion then was that online courses were a joke and you couldn't learn from taking a course online. Now my opinion has done a complete 180. The teachers post numerous youtube videos and other helpful tools for each assignment so that anyone can successfully complete the assignment no matter what their technology skill level is. I do not see much difference between online and face-to-face now because of the way the instructors teach the courses.
msovoice

Parents: Your Children Need Professors with Tenure - 18 views

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    Of course, problems with the tenure system exist. However, this writer makes a good case for it and appeals to the parents of our students for support. I may send it to my college students as well.
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