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Kathleen Howard DaQuanno

untitled - 28 views

    The Inquiry Design Model The Inquiry Design Model (IDM) is a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers' knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for State …
Sharin Tebo

Creating a Culture of Inquiry | Edutopia - 74 views

  • Inquiry
  • creating a culture of inquiry takes constant work. Teachers need to establish it from the first day in the classroom, and work to keep it vital throughout the year. Here are some important things to know about creating that culture, and some ideas that you might consider.
  • Culture
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  • Questioning
  • When we make a change or set an expectation for how a classroom will operate, we begin to affect the climate. It takes time for something to become a part of the culture
  • culture of inquiry
  • Scaffold
  • A culture of inquiry will not happen overnight, but the right climate for it is much easier to establish.
  • Teachers should use a variety of strategies, such as structured protocols and question starters and stems, to support students in asking effective questions.
  • One great tool for building a culture of inquiry is essential questions that drive learning.
  • Rather than focusing on the answer, they should focus on the process of inquiry that begins when the question is asked.
  • we have to make sure that our assignments also mirror and honor inquiry
    • Do our assignments focus on complexity and justification?
    • Do we honor student voice and choice in these assignments? Are students allowed choice in what they produce and voice in what the assignment will look like?
    • Do we create assignments and assessments that allow students to investigate their own questions aligned to the content that we want them to learn?

  • A culture of inquiry can only become the classroom norm if there is commitment from all stakeholders -- parents, students, teachers, administration, and more. Simply saying that we are an inquiry-based classroom and doing an occasional inquiry-based activity is not indicative of a culture of inquiry.
Sharin Tebo

Scholastic Canada Education-Teaching Tip of the Month * January 2012 - 21 views

  • the power of compelling questions that drives deep interest, understanding, caring, and the application of 21st century skills.
  • During a whole group inquiry, students gain competence by being guided through the process and develop necessary skills and tools to aid in self-initiated inquiries. Often students don't have the necessary background knowledge to pose their own questions or lack understanding in identifying a question worthy of investigation so the large group approach is essential when getting started.
  • Begin by examining your curriculum and identifying a topic that you think will be interesting to students.
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  • Questions are open-ended in nature with no 'correct' answer; in fact, the answer is unknown. Inquiry questions represent what is at the "heart of the matter" and frame the unit as a puzzle or problem to be solved.
  • Your role in the large group inquiry is one of coach or facilitator.
    Getting Started with Inquiry Learning in Your Classroom
Sharin Tebo

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Edutopia - 40 views

  • It's no secret that curiosity makes learning more effective and enjoyable. Curious students not only ask questions, but also actively seek out the answers.
  • While it might be no big surprise that we're more likely to remember what we've learned when the subject matter intrigues us, it turns out that curiosity also helps us learn information we don't consider all that interesting or important.

    The researchers found that, once the subjects' curiosity had been piqued by the right question, they were better at learning and remembering completely unrelated information

  • if a student struggles with math, personalizing math problems to match their specific interests rather than using generic textbook questions could help them better remember how to go about solving similar math problems in the future.
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  • there is no such thing as a dumb question, because as cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham notes in his book Why Don't Students Like School?, it's the question that stimulates curiosity -- being told the answer quells curiosity before it can even get going.
    Curiosity's role in Students' Learning
Matt Renwick

How Classroom Coaching Promotes Self-Reliant Learning | MiddleWeb - 1 views

  • In inquiry learning, when results don’t turn out to be exactly as planned or predicted, teachers have to manage how that outcome is perceived.
Matt Renwick

20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning - 144 views

    Interesting. These questions are at a more macro-level of planning than the interpretive ones I am used to preparing for close reading and Shared Inquiry discussion. Nice that they can be used by either students or teachers.
Jon Tanner

Education Models - 48 views

    The Wisconsin Innovative Schools Network embraces (and supports) several different education models which are transformative rather than incremental.
Don Doehla

The Best 1:1 Device is a Good Teacher | Edutopia - 56 views

    "Over the course of two years, I, along with the Burlington Public Schools tech team, had the opportunity to meet and connect with over one hundred schools. These discussions would usually involve what device works best in the classroom and how the iPad is affecting teaching and learning outcomes. Frequently this conversation focuses on the most effective hardware for teaching and learning. While this is an important decision to make, it should not be the focus. In fact, the best devices a school can employ are great teachers."
Roland Gesthuizen

How-and why-to teach innovation in our schools | eSchool News - 67 views

    "An innovation curriculum requires an emphasis on what I am going to call, for lack of a preexisting term, the Five I's: Imagination, Inquiry, Invention, Implementation, and Initiative (the latter being a foundational trait that enables the other four). Here is my take on how to teach each of the Five I's of innovation in our schools."
    Love the notion of the 5 I's - many already comfortable with the 4 (or 5) C's - but have a look at Jamie McKenzie's post from 2010 - "A Dozen I Words Trump the 4 R's" - funnily enough, I just came across it yesterday whlst doing some prep!

What It Takes to Become an All Project-Based School | MindShift - 97 views

    A School goes all PBL
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