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Sharin Tebo

Creating a Culture of Inquiry | Edutopia - 78 views

  • Inquiry
  • creating a culture of inquiry takes constant work. Teachers need to establish it from the first day in the classroom, and work to keep it vital throughout the year. Here are some important things to know about creating that culture, and some ideas that you might consider.
  • Culture
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • Questioning
  • When we make a change or set an expectation for how a classroom will operate, we begin to affect the climate. It takes time for something to become a part of the culture
  • culture of inquiry
  • Scaffold
  • A culture of inquiry will not happen overnight, but the right climate for it is much easier to establish.
  • Teachers should use a variety of strategies, such as structured protocols and question starters and stems, to support students in asking effective questions.
  • One great tool for building a culture of inquiry is essential questions that drive learning.
  • Rather than focusing on the answer, they should focus on the process of inquiry that begins when the question is asked.
  • we have to make sure that our assignments also mirror and honor inquiry
  • Do our assignments focus on complexity and justification? Do we honor student voice and choice in these assignments? Are students allowed choice in what they produce and voice in what the assignment will look like? Do we create assignments and assessments that allow students to investigate their own questions aligned to the content that we want them to learn?
  • A culture of inquiry can only become the classroom norm if there is commitment from all stakeholders -- parents, students, teachers, administration, and more. Simply saying that we are an inquiry-based classroom and doing an occasional inquiry-based activity is not indicative of a culture of inquiry.
Lisa Francine

School Library Monthly - Student Inquiry and Web 2.0 - 54 views

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    "The Stripling Inquiry Model has six phases; however, it's not a linear process but rather a recursive one in which the learner might revisit a previous stage to ask additional questions or organize information, as the need arises. Each phase involves critical thinking skills that empower young people to learn on their own and develop the thinking skills to be independent, lifelong learners. The phases are as follows: Connect: observe, experience, connect a subject to self and previous knowledge Wonder: predict, develop questions and hypotheses Investigate: find and evaluate information to answer questions, test hypotheses Construct: draw conclusions, arrive at new understandings Express: apply understandings to a new context, share learning with others Reflect: examine one's own learning and ask new questions (Stripling 2003, 8). Technology and, in particular, Web 2.0 tools and services can be used throughout the Inquiry process to support the appropriate thinking skills. The key is to focus on student learning, not the Web 2.0 technology. The focus is on the phase(s) of Inquiry at which students are concentrating and deciding which technology tool can best support the thinking processes and instructional strategies of that phase of Inquiry. This increases the effectiveness of both the learning experience and the use of technology. An outline of the Inquiry phases aligned with Web 2.0 technology tools and instructional strategies can be seen in Figure 2."
Keisa Williams

Inquiry-based Learning and the Web: An epaper - 103 views

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    "In this epaper, we describe a structured approach to inquiry-based learning that uses the World Wide Web as a primary information resource. Specifically, we address an intuitive 8-step process that begins with an essential question and ends with a knowledge product produced by students, typically completed in a cooperative setting. We also discuss the skills required by both student and teacher to make inquiry-based learning and the Internet a successful endeavor. Finally, we discuss the components of a Project Page, an online document that facilitates the learning process and support the reader with Web links relating to inquiry-based learning."
Mark Gleeson

How to: Inquiry | YouthLearn - 85 views

  • Before going to the kids, determine any preliminary factors or characteristics that must be true in order to achieve your larger goals or plans
  • Almost any topic can become the foundation for an inquiry-based project, even something as mundane as shoes,
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    Steps to the Inquiry process
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    Check this site out.... wonderful explanation on the Inquiry process.
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    Interesting read on an inquiry model of learning. 
Sharin Tebo

Scholastic Canada Education-Teaching Tip of the Month * January 2012 - 21 views

  • the power of compelling questions that drives deep interest, understanding, caring, and the application of 21st century skills.
  • During a whole group inquiry, students gain competence by being guided through the process and develop necessary skills and tools to aid in self-initiated inquiries. Often students don't have the necessary background knowledge to pose their own questions or lack understanding in identifying a question worthy of investigation so the large group approach is essential when getting started.
  • Begin by examining your curriculum and identifying a topic that you think will be interesting to students.
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  • Questions are open-ended in nature with no 'correct' answer; in fact, the answer is unknown. Inquiry questions represent what is at the "heart of the matter" and frame the unit as a puzzle or problem to be solved.
  • Your role in the large group inquiry is one of coach or facilitator.
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    Getting Started with Inquiry Learning in Your Classroom
John Lustig

Learning to Learn - Tools and Technologies for Inquiry Based Learning - 137 views

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    Inquiry based learning originates with John Dewey's philosophy that education begins with curiousity. It focuses on guiding students through a process of finding answers to questions. Inquiry based learning: Is driven by questions of interest rather than general topics.Emphasizes asking good researchable questions.Coaches students as they go.Provides research journal to help students monitor their progress.Draws on expertise of the instructor / teacher librarian to model effective Inquiry.Assesses student progress in developing Inquiry skills as well as understanding of content.
Kathleen Howard DaQuanno

untitled - 29 views

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    The Inquiry Design Model The Inquiry Design Model (IDM) is a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers' knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for State …
psmiley

11 Ways to Make an Inquiry-Based Classroom | TeachHUB - 95 views

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    Inquiry Learning strategies
Deborah Chang

Learning Science Through Inquiry - 110 views

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    What is Inquiry Teaching and How to Do It
Mark Gleeson

7 Ways to Transform Your Classroom « David Truss :: Pair-a-dimes for Your Thoughts - 80 views

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     the Inquiry Hub has deconstructed the school day, getting rid of class blocks and it also provides online blended learning opportunities that most schools simply could not duplicate. That said, much of what we are doing can be done in any classroom. So here are seven key aspects we are exploring at the Inquiry Hub that can help transform any classroom into a more engaging, and student-empowered learning space.
Matt Renwick

20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning - 145 views

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    Interesting. These questions are at a more macro-level of planning than the interpretive ones I am used to preparing for close reading and Shared Inquiry discussion. Nice that they can be used by either students or teachers.
Jenny Gough

An Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning - 122 views

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    "What kinds of questions make for good inquiry-based projects? As we said, they must first be questions that the kids truly care about because they come up with them themselves. In addition, good questions share the following characteristics: The questions must be answerable. "What is the poem 'Dream Deferred' based on?" is answerable. "Why did Langston Hughes write it?" may be answerable if such information exists, or if the students have some relevant and defensible opinions. "Why did he choose this particular word in line six?" is not answerable because the only person likely to know such a specific answer is Hughes himself, now deceased. The answer cannot be a simple fact. "In what year was Lincoln killed?" doesn't make for a very compelling project because you can just look it up in any number of books or Web sites. "What factors caused the assassination attempt?" might be a good project because it will require research, interpretation, and analysis. The answer can't already be known. "What is hip-hop music?" is a bit too straightforward and the kids are not likely to learn much more than they know already. "What musical styles does hip-hop draw from and how?" offers more opportunity for exploration. The questions must have some objective basis for an answer. "Why is the sky blue?" can be answered through research. "Why did God make the sky blue?" cannot because it is a faith-based question. Both are meaningful, valid, real questions, but the latter isn't appropriate for an inquiry-based project. "What have people said about why God made the sky blue?" might be appropriate. Likewise, "Why did the dinosaurs become extinct?" is ultimately unanswerable in that form because no humans were around to know for sure, but "What do scientists believe was the reason for their extinction?" or "What does the evidence suggest about the cause?" will work. Questions based on value judgments don't work for similar reasons. You can't objectively answer "Is Hamle
Marc Patton

WebQuest.Org: Home - 3 views

  • A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web.
  • A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web.
  • A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web.
  • A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web.
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    WebQuest Main Page.
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    You've arrived at the most complete and current source of information about the WebQuest Model. Whether you're an education student new to the topic or an experienced teacher educator looking for materials, you'll find something here to meet your needs.
Nigel Coutts

Inquiry vs Direct Instruction - The Great Debate and How it Went Wrong - The Learner's Way - 48 views

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    There is a debate taking place in the world of education. It is not a new debate but recently it has gathered new energy and the boundary between polite discussion of opposing views and hostility has been stretched. The debate is that between those who are advocates of inquiry based learning and those who believe direct instruction produces the best outcomes. - This article explore how the debate has gone wrong and fails to serve the needs of learners.
Nigel Coutts

Inquiry Based Learning is dead, long live Inquiry. - 86 views

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    In the ebb and flow of educational theories and approaches to learning one can see many commonalities to the world of fashion. A good idea emerges, becomes mainstream, is appropriated by a wide number of educators who blend the essential elements into their methodology and over time the once good idea becomes an oversimplified or slightly misunderstood model of what it once was.
Frederick Eberhardt

Powerful Learning: Studies Show Deep Understanding Derives from Collaborative Methods | Edutopia - 85 views

  • In essence, students must learn how to learn, while responding to endlessly changing technologies and social, economic, and global conditions.
  • students learn more deeply if they have engaged in activities that require applying classroom-gathered knowledge to real-world problems.
  • developing inquiring minds
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  • Studies of problem-based learning suggest that it is comparable, though not always superior, to more traditional instruction in teaching facts and information. However, this approach has been found to be better in supporting flexible problem solving, reasoning skills, and generating accurate hypotheses and coherent explanations.
  • design challenges need to be carefully planned, and they emphasized the importance of dynamic feedback.
  • When students have no prior experience with inquiry learning, they can have difficulty generating meaningful driving questions and logical arguments and may lack background knowledge to make sense of the inquiry.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Absolutely true. I discovered this when I used inquiry-based methods with my students in Qatar who were used to rote learning. They truly did not know where to start. They first needed to learn *how* to be inquisitive.
  • Requiring students to track and defend their thinking focused them on learning and connecting concepts in their design work
  • All the research arrives at the same conclusion: There are significant benefits for students who work together on learning activities.
  • groups outperform individuals on learning tasks and that individuals who work in groups do better on later individual assessments.
  • In successful group learning, teachers pay careful attention to the work process and interaction among students.
  • "It is not enough to simply tell students to work together. They must have a reason to take one another's achievement seriously.
  • She and her colleagues developed Complex Instruction, one of the best-known approaches, which uses carefully designed activities requiring diverse talents and interdependence among group members.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Interesting... worth checking out.
  • They require changes in curriculum, instruction, and assessment practices -- changes that are often new for teachers and students.
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    A scholarly article with tremendous real-world practical implications and suggestions. Love this.
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    A scholarly article with tremendous real-world practical implications and suggestions. Love this.
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    Vocational Education meets Research in the dynamic classroom of Linda Darling-Hammond, 2008. The students are doing the research, teaching and learning. They control their own destiny and they are taking the world by storm! They are not waiting to be taught, they are teaching each other and themselves as teams of researchers. Darling-Hammond, L. (2008). Powerful learning: what we know about teaching for understanding. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
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