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John Evans

Math Education: The Roots of Computer Science | Edutopia - 0 views

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    "Math matters for computer science because it teaches students how to use abstract language, work with algorithms, self-analyze their computational thinking, and accurately modeling real-world solutions."
John Evans

Every Child Ready for Math | Global Family Research Project - 0 views

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    "One of the most exciting trends in public libraries is how families and children are engaging together in playful early learning. Much of this has been influenced by Every Child Ready to Read, a program that guides families in children's early literacy by talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing. [1] There is less attention paid, however, to how libraries and families can support early math. This is unfortunate, given that early math skills are highly predictive of later academic success, even more so than reading abilities or socio-emotional development.[2] Like literacy, math is a tool, and one that can be developed and honed early in life. 

    Building on the success of Every Child Ready to Read, below we offer six ideas for how librarians and families can talk, sing, read, write, and play with math. Libraries are in a perfect position to promote family math, as they increasingly offer opportunities for families to tinker with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM); offer a wide range of digital media resources-many with a math focus; and are trusted places where families of young children congregate for story times and other activities.[3] "
John Evans

The Teacher's Role in Personalized Learning: Making Math Relevant - Next Gen Learning i... - 1 views

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    "What is your most memorable math lesson? For me, it was when Mrs. Kaylor helped us visualize and understand place value by building straw men as we counted straws by units of one, ten, and a hundred.

    I struggle to come up with many more memories and there's a good chance I'm not alone. If I asked the same question for other subjects, like social studies or language arts, however, I bet your answers would come a lot more easily.

    The difference? These subjects include lessons that are often applicable to real life. Whether it's a mock trial, a school play, or a science experiment, project work deepens student learning by allowing them to explore the connections between content and real life.

    Math lessons, on the other hand, have historically focused less on real-life connections. Like many students, I excelled in math by memorizing rules and tricks. In college, I trained to teach social studies, but became a math teacher by accident because I had earned enough math credits to qualify for a math teaching certification. It wasn't until I returned to earn a master's in math education that I discovered that math can be so much more than memorization."
John Evans

The Art Of Computational Thinking - Just Thinking - Medium - 1 views

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    " I heard a great talk a few months ago. It was Conrad Wolfram (probably one of the world's leading mathematicians) who suggested, that we should stop teaching our kids maths. Whoah!

    He said, and I'm paraphrasing, we needed to teach them computational thinking instead. What is that? He said every problem needs breaking apart, exploding it into its parts - if we are to begin to properly solve them. And better still that we explain to kids how to put that idea into practice. Explain to them, for example, that to make their bike go faster they might figure out how much bigger the peddle wheel needs to be than than the one on the back wheel.

    According to Wikipedia computational thinking is an iterative process based on three stages: 1. Problem formulation (abstraction) 2. Solution expression (automation) 3. Solution execution and evaluation (analyses)
    That REALLY works for me."
John Evans

Free Technology for Teachers: The Math and Science of Valentine's Day - 1 views

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    "Valentine's Day is less than two weeks away. In middle schools and high schools everywhere there will be students who are excited about it, some who dread it, and others who are indifferent. I always fell into the indifferent category. Wherever your students stand on Valentine's Day, the following two videos make for interesting lessons about Valentine's Day."
John Evans

Productive Struggle & Math Rigor | ST Math - 0 views

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    "Shortcuts"
John Evans

Dig Into Number Talks! - 1 views

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    "What strategies are you planning for building number sense and problem-solving skills this year?

    Check out our Number Talks collection to see a daily, short, structured way for students to talk about math with their peers."
John Evans

Why Chinese children are better at math than Americans - Business Insider - 1 views

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    "For the most part, American children aren't great at math.

    But Chinese children tend to be excellent.

    Testing half a million students worldwide, the Program for International Student Assessment is one of the most widely cited measurements of global education, and it's consistently found Chinese students at the top of the academic pile ... and Americans much nearer the bottom. Some experts argue that the PISA assessment, like any standardized tests, primarily measures a student's ability to take the test, not their knowledge, but hardly anyone disputes that the American education has some work to do when it comes to math. 

    In Lenora Chu's new book "Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve," she begins to unearth the cultural differences that lead to this gap - and it's not just about what happens at school."
John Evans

Finding the Beauty of Math Outside of Class | Edutopia - 3 views

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    "A math trail is an activity that gets students out of the classroom so they can (re)discover the math all around us. Whether out on a field trip or on school grounds, students on a math trail are asked to solve or create problems about objects and landmarks they see; name shapes and composite solids; calculate areas and volumes; recognize properties, similarity, congruence, and symmetry; use number sense and estimation to evaluate large quantities and assess assumptions; and so on.

    This is one of those creative, yet authentic activities that stimulate engagement and foster enthusiasm for mathematics-and so it can be particularly useful for students in middle and high school, when classroom math becomes more abstract."
Keri-Lee Beasley

What's Going On in This Graph? - The New York Times - 2 views

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    Great monthly feature from the NY Times & American Statistical Association - What's going on in this graph?
    A new graph posted each month, together with visible thinking strategies, and the possibility of joining for an online (moderated) discussion to talk about predictions.
John Evans

Overcoming Math Anxiety -Manan Khurma - BW Businessworld - 1 views

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    "Mathematics is a fundamentally logical and beautiful subject, but one that universally invokes a sense of anxiety and fear in students and adults. However, mathematics is in everything around us and it is more than just a subject, it is an essential life skill."
John Evans

Here's how to win at Monopoly, according to math experts | - 3 views

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    "Mathematicians Hannah Fry and Thomas Oléron Evans have crunched the numbers. Forget utilities - these are the properties you really should be investing in."
John Evans

Learning Never Stops: 56 great math websites for students of any age - 2 views

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    "Below you will find 56 of the best math resource websites available. Parents and teachers of children 3 to 23 who are looking for videos, games, worksheets, printables, lessons, tutorials, calculators, worksheet generators, activities or interactives will likely find what they are looking for.
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John Evans

Building a Thinking Classroom in Math | Edutopia - 1 views

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    "Over more than a decade, the author has developed a 14-point plan for encouraging students to engage deeply with math content."
John Evans

Ontario Math Links: Math Links for Week Ending Oct. 6th, 2017 - 0 views

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    "I have added a new page to this blog. I called it Notable Links. It compiles many of the teacher generated sites (Estimation 180, WODB etc) as well as many teacher blogs where they often share resources. It's by no means a complete list and I am sure I will miss some but I wanted to have a running list of the best stuff somewhere (if only for me)"
John Evans

There's No Such Thing as Being Bad at Math: How Neuroscience Is Changing the Equation |... - 1 views

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    "Imagine a parent telling a child, "I'm just not a reading person." Sounds odd, doesn't it? Now reread the same cartoon, substituting "math" for "reading." Suddenly it doesn't seem so absurd. But it should!

    As a society ever more reliant on technology and STEM-based careers, we must shatter the myth that math skill is inborn and reinforce that it is the result of intention and practice.
    It's common to hear well educated adults declare themselves "not a math person," sometimes proudly. Indeed, many people of all ages believe that mathematical ability is something you are either born with or not, rather than something to be mastered with focused effort. This belief is wrong. What's more, it's harmful to kids as they have their first experiences learning math; the attitude that "I can't learn math" quickly becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. As a society ever more reliant on technology and STEM-based careers, we must shatter the myth that math skill is inborn and reinforce that it is the result of intention and practice. Reforming these perceptions needs to be a priority for teachers, parents, and creators of new learning tools that align to the way these digital-savvy students learn."
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