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Home/ Literacy with ICT/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by John Evans

Contents contributed and discussions participated by John Evans

John Evans

Ancient Greek Computational Thinking - ERATOSTHENES | Teaching London Computing: A RESO... - 0 views

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    "The Ancient Greeks loved algorithms, and devised lots of useful ones. One of the most famous is the Sieve of Eratosthenes. It is a way to find prime numbers, special numbers that are also known as the atoms of numbers. Prime numbers now form the basis of our most powerful encryption systems upon which digital money is based. Our electronic banking systems (and lots more) would collapse without prime numbers. You can use the Sieve of Eratosthenes as a way to practice times tables, spot patterns and explore how to improve algorithms, whilst also uncovering these mysterious, magical numbers with no obvious pattern of their own. Here you can follow in the footsteps of Eratosthenes and develop your algorithmic thinking skills."
John Evans

Sneaking Past the Summer Slide: How to Make the Most of Summer Without a Single Flashca... - 0 views

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    "As the school year draws to a close, I am looking forward to the laidback freedom of summer with its less hectic schedule and longer daylight hours. If I'm being completely honest, there's something really incredible about turning off my alarm clock for the foreseeable future. For me, it's time to recharge, to reflect and to prepare to return to the classroom and library renewed with energy and ideas. As an educator, I'm also keenly aware of the potential for kids to suffer from the summer slide-a loss of academic progress over the course of the summer months. According to a study done by the Colorado Department of Education, children in low-income households fall behind an average of 2 months in reading during the summer. And, summer slide is cumulative, with these learning losses building up each summer. The basic solution? Stay engaged in learning: read, write, do some math."
John Evans

Free Technology for Teachers: This is Clickbait - A Lesson on Being a Discerning News C... - 1 views

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    "A couple of weeks ago TED-Ed released a video about spotting misleading headlines. I quickly added that lesson to my list of resources for helping students become discerning news consumers. This week TED-Ed released another video that I'm adding to that list of resources."
John Evans

I And You And Us: 30 Inspiring Messages For Students - - 1 views

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    "We've talked about student engagement and motivational videos for teens, in addition to 'good class rules.' This is similar but not intently meant to 'inspire.' Rather, the hope is that by separating these kinds of messages into three different categories and perspectives (I, You, and Us/We), you might be able to use them to guide a lot of what you do, from curriculum and instructional design to creating class rules and norms."
John Evans

Science Says This Is How Stress Kills Your Motivation | Inc.com - 1 views

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    "Achieving success typically means keeping a solid grip on your motivation. Otherwise, long-haul projects fizzle fast as you encounter the strain of regular challenges.  But scientists from Emory University now say that chronic inflammation is a huge troublemaker, and that it might interfere with your drive to persist and explore. According to their new theory, detailed in the paper Can't or Won't? Immunometabolic Constraints on Dopaminergic Drive, chronic inflammation puts a squeeze on your brain's dopamine supply. You probably know dopamine best for its role in helping you feel happy, but it's a chemical that keeps your brain seeking novelty, too."
John Evans

Pool Noodle Uses for the Classroom - 33 Brilliant Ideas - 1 views

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    "We love pool noodles! They're bright, colorful, and make great manipulatives for reading, math, and beyond. Plus, this time of year, they're so inexpensive to buy (you can even get them in bulk and shipped for free). Here are some of our favorite pool noodle uses for the classroom."
John Evans

10 Years After an Exercise Study, Benefits Persist - The New York Times - 2 views

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    "The workouts we completed years ago may continue to influence and improve our health today, according to a fascinating new study of the current lives and health of people who joined an exercise study a decade before. The findings suggest that the benefits of exercise can be more persistent than many of us might expect, even if people are not exercising to the same extent as they previously did. But the impacts also may depend on the types and amounts of exercise involved."
John Evans

Learning Engineering Should Be On Your Radar | Learning Solutions Magazine - 0 views

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    "The term learning engineering was coined more than 50 years ago by Herbert Simon, a Nobel Laureate and Carnegie Mellon professor. Today there is renewed interest in the discipline, which merges scientific methods and engineering principles with learning. A new Guild Research report, Learning Engineering: A Primer, by Ellen Wagner, PhD, explores how learning engineering is expected to impact L&D. It may be of specific interest to instructional designers, who may already be incorporating or honing some of the skills that learning engineers require."
John Evans

Innovation Playlist - Ted Dintersmith - 0 views

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    "Face it. Like all organizations, schools get locked into routine, impeding change. But all schools need to innovate to prepare kids for a dynamic and uncertain future. The question is, "How?" The Innovation Playlist can help your school make positive, informed change. It represents a teacher-led model, based on small steps leading to big change, that draws on best practices from outstanding educators and non-profits from across the country. The Innovation Playlist consists of albums (the big goals on the left) and tracks (the small steps on the right that help you reach each big goal). Each track can be done quickly - fifteen minutes to a day or two - with minimal downside and lots of upside. The playlist process can be led by a school's principal, by faculty at the school, grade or department level, or even by a family at home. The "Mobilize Your Community" album is the ideal place to start, letting you generate enthusiasm for innovation. Then, focus on a few tracks in coming months. Start with one (e.g., Curiosity Time), find a few eager volunteers to try it (many will!), and have them share their experience with the entire faculty. Over time, encourage the early adopters to go deeper, and others to give it a try. Innovation is contagious. This "small steps leading to big change" model means you don't risk the painfully-visible failure that inevitably comes from a sweeping top-down dictum. Each teacher can innovate as much, or as little, as fits their strengths and styles. Give permission to those itching to innovate, and let them run with it. And if a teacher isn't up for this kind of innovation, that's ok, too… It can be a good thing for students to experience a range of pedagogies."
John Evans

How (and Why) to Disable Algorithmic Feeds on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook - 2 views

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    "Social networks offer a stream of updates from your family and friends or people you follow. But the feed you see isn't chronological. Instead, the social networks try to figure out what you'd like to see first, and show that instead. However, algorithmic feeds mean you'll miss some updates you might want to see. Which is why you should disable algorithmic feeds and enable chronological feeds instead. In this article we show you how to do that on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. "
John Evans

5 Twitter Tools to Discover the Best and Funniest Tweets - 2 views

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    "Twitter can be overwhelming if you don't use it regularly. Here are a few tools to discover the best and funniest tweets, and ensure you don't miss out on some of its best moments."
John Evans

3 Ways to Use Email Aliases in Gmail to Your Advantage - 1 views

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    "Email aliases are an easy way to get fresh email addresses in Gmail without having to sign up for an account all over again. Creating an alias is as easy as appending a + sign to your Gmail username followed by a keyword of your choice. Any email sent to this new address still ends up in your Gmail inbox, but will show a distinct To address that's different from your primary Gmail address. Here's how you can make this feature work to your advantage to manage your Gmail inbox better."
John Evans

What Does It Mean to Prepare Students for a Future With Artificial Intelligence? | EdSu... - 0 views

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    "Last year, in the height of the election season, the Obama administration quietly released a national strategic plan for artificial intelligence (AI) research and development. The plan was the beginning of a national effort to prepare Americans for a future with AI-a future some computer scientist believe our nation is ill-equipped to handle. AI has become a part of the American fabric for some time. Siri and Alexa are already taking orders, self-driving cars have hit some streets, and the concept of interconnectivity is now a reality through the Internet of Things. But experts assert that in order for the society to fully embrace AI, learning machines should not replace human workers, but complement them. So to prepare the future workforce for a computer coworker, there must be a shift in teaching and learning-a change that should begin in the classroom."
John Evans

Using Python Projects to Make a Better Math Class - Young Coder - Medium - 0 views

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    "Peter Farrell spent more than a decade teaching math and computer science. Somewhere along the way, he began using Python to create programming challenges to pair with his lessons. But what started as a way to reinforce math concepts gradually developed into something else - a gateway to a more practical approach to math education. Peter saw how coding projects allowed students to shift from passively learning concepts to actively working, reasoning, and playing with them. In other words, code helped them to go from learning about math to actually doing math. As he says "Why should the science, art, and home-ec students have all the fun? It's about time we heard students saying Look what I made in math class!""
John Evans

Deepfakes are getting better-but they're still easy to spot | Ars Technica - 0 views

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    "Last week, Mona Lisa smiled. A big, wide smile, followed by what appeared to be a laugh and the silent mouthing of words that could only be an answer to the mystery that had beguiled her viewers for centuries. A great many people were unnerved. Ars Technica Join Ars Technica and Get Our Best Tech Stories DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR INBOX. SIGN ME UP Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy Mona's "living portrait," along with likenesses of Marilyn Monroe, Salvador Dali, and others, demonstrated the latest technology in deepfakes-seemingly realistic video or audio generated using machine learning. Developed by researchers at Samsung's AI lab in Moscow, the portraits display a new method to create credible videos from a single image. With just a few photographs of real faces, the results improve dramatically, producing what the authors describe as "photorealistic talking heads." The researchers (creepily) call the result "puppeteering," a reference to how invisible strings seem to manipulate the targeted face. And yes, it could, in theory, be used to animate your Facebook profile photo. But don't freak out about having strings maliciously pulling your visage anytime soon. "Nothing suggests to me that you'll just turnkey use this for generating deepfakes at home. Not in the short-term, medium-term, or even the long-term," says Tim Hwang, director of the Harvard-MIT Ethics and Governance of AI Initiative. The reasons have to do with the high costs and technical know-how of creating quality fakes-barriers that aren't going away anytime soon."
John Evans

How to See Who's On Your Wi-Fi | PCMag.com - 4 views

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    "Is your internet sluggish? If you suspect a neighbor is stealing your Wi-Fi, these two apps can help you identify devices using your connection and help you boot them off. "
John Evans

Four Research-Based Strategies Every Teacher Should be Using | Cult of Pedagogy - 2 views

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    "If you've opened this post hoping to read something brand-new, you might be disappointed. There will be no fancy bells or whistles here. That's because a lot of the strategies we're going to talk about are things you've already done; some teachers have probably been doing them for decades. You just might not have known exactly why they worked or how to harness them in the most optimal way. That's what cognitive scientists have been doing, trying to pinpoint exactly which activities work best for storing concepts in long-term memory. Over the past few years, we've been following their progress: In our 2015 study of the book Make it Stick, we first talked about the concepts of retrieval practice, spaced practice, and interleaving. These concepts were also addressed in the 2016 post Six Powerful Learning Strategies You Must Share with Students, and in 2017, where I made a strong push again for using more retrieval practice in our teaching."
John Evans

Using Rubik's Cubes to Teach Math in High School | Edutopia - 1 views

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    ""I don't like math," my students commonly say. The alternative high school in rural Colorado where I've been working for the last two-and-a-half years serves students ages 14 to 20, who come to us when they have not done well in traditional environments since we have more freedom to use creative instructional methods to meet their needs. Thinking about that comment, I used to ask myself, "How would the students' attitudes toward math change if there was an opportunity to experience a different side of math, one that involved hands-on learning, promoted teamwork, and ended in a product to be proud of?" I thought I could use Rubik's Cubes to facilitate camaraderie among my math-anxious and math-eager students, based on my own love of the popular puzzle. And after learning about students creating mosaics of historical figures, famous landmarks, and animals out of the cubes, I saw a way to promote critical thinking and algorithmic problem-solving."
John Evans

The School Librarian: Your Ultimate Digital Resource - Educational Leadership - 1 views

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    "Consider the following scenarios: Laurie's school is trying to individualize students' learning experiences. As a 9th grade social studies teacher, Laurie is expected to use her school's learning management system to provide texts at multiple reading levels for her units so every student can read at their level. In one corner of an elementary school library are tables with lots of "gadgets" and a sign reading "Welcome to Our Makerspace!" Fazil, a 3rd grade teacher, is curious about this area and how it can be used to support his curricular goals. Guidance counselor Shonna is concerned that Maria, a 10th grader, is using Instagram in ways that might be damaging to her in the future. But Shonna doesn't feel she has the knowledge or experience to guide Maria in using social networking tools. In these instances, a school librarian would likely have the expertise to help a teacher use technology more advantageously. As expectations for classroom teachers to use-and understand-technology tools grow, the need for assistance in using these tools effectively is growing as well. Teachers don't always realize that one powerful source of such assistance is a school-based librarian. So, as a technology director who often sees good librarian-teacher collaboration, I want to highlight how powerful that assistance can be."
John Evans

New MOOCs: Teaching AI in primary and secondary classrooms | CSER Digital Technologies ... - 1 views

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    "Artificial Intelligence (AI) is driving the next wave of technological innovation and is changing almost every industry around us. With the expansion and ubiquity of AI being a motivating factor in the decisions and need for all children to develop their understanding of Computer Science, it is logical that children also must need to develop their understanding of AI itself. We have two free teacher professional development MOOCs in AI available to suit your year level: Teaching AI in the Primary Classroom and Teaching AI in the Secondary Classroom. Our AI courses are presented in two related parts. Firstly, we provide school teachers with an overview of AI, unpacking AI and key concepts across both MOOCs. The second half of our AI MOOCs are specific to the year level you have selected (primary or secondary). In these units, we present the practical implementation of classroom activities that engage students in learning about AI, including support for teachers about the design and assessment of learning activities. You may complete one or both primary and secondary courses! From the 21st of June, our "Overview" units will be available to access, with the second half of the course being available in July. Registration is now open!"
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