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John Evans

I And You And Us: 30 Inspiring Messages For Students - - 0 views

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    "We've talked about student engagement and motivational videos for teens, in addition to 'good class rules.' This is similar but not intently meant to 'inspire.' Rather, the hope is that by separating these kinds of messages into three different categories and perspectives (I, You, and Us/We), you might be able to use them to guide a lot of what you do, from curriculum and instructional design to creating class rules and norms."
John Evans

What Does It Mean to Prepare Students for a Future With Artificial Intelligence? | EdSu... - 0 views

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    "Last year, in the height of the election season, the Obama administration quietly released a national strategic plan for artificial intelligence (AI) research and development. The plan was the beginning of a national effort to prepare Americans for a future with AI-a future some computer scientist believe our nation is ill-equipped to handle. AI has become a part of the American fabric for some time. Siri and Alexa are already taking orders, self-driving cars have hit some streets, and the concept of interconnectivity is now a reality through the Internet of Things. But experts assert that in order for the society to fully embrace AI, learning machines should not replace human workers, but complement them. So to prepare the future workforce for a computer coworker, there must be a shift in teaching and learning-a change that should begin in the classroom."
John Evans

9 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Using Listicles in Class | EdSurge News - 0 views

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    "Listicles are a humorous way for students to condense and share information through text and images. But how do they work in the classroom? Here's why teachers and students can learn a thing or two (or nine) from BuzzFeed."
John Evans

How to Teach an Intro to 3D Printing Class | Renovated Learning - 0 views

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    "I am by no means a 3D printing expert.  But I do have three 3D printers in my library makerspace (and one in my previous space).  And I have a lot of students who are very interested in learning more about 3D printing.  Some students have built their own 3D printers from kits and love to come hang out and tell me about their latest projects.  Other students have no CAD (computer aided design) experience but are eager to start building. In order to help all of these students better utilize and access our 3D printers, I created a short, Intro to 3D printing session that I teach afterschool every quarter.  It's essentially an orientation to how 3D printing works, how to create a design and how to get it ready to print."
John Evans

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Ways for Students of All Ages to Make Animated Videos - 2 views

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    "Making animated videos is a great way for students to bring their written stories to life on screen. Those could be fiction or nonfiction stories. Some nonfiction animated video topics include making a video to illustrate a historical event, making biographies, and explaining complex concepts in simple animations like Common Craft does. In the fiction realm you might have students make an adaptation of a favorite story or an animation of their own creative writing. Whichever direction you choose, the following five tools offer good ways for students of all ages to make their own animated videos."
John Evans

Teach Students to Track How Many Words They Read Per Minute Using Voice Typing and Goog... - 3 views

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    "As elementary students learn how to read, teachers administer reading fluency tests and listen to students read passages. During these reading fluency tests, teachers listen for speed, accuracy, and expression. Nothing can replace this formal assessment, but it's helpful to teach students to track their words per minute between these reading fluency assessments. Tracking their words per minute can help students to appreciate that the more they practice reading a passage, the more words they will be able to read in a minute. In a coaching session with a second-grade teacher, I suggested we try using Voice Typing in Google Documents to help students track how many words they read in a minute. I hoped that giving them the tools to track their words per minute might motivate them to stay focused on the task of reading a challenging passage."
John Evans

Teachers Use Mystery Skype To Give Students A Window On The World : NPR - 0 views

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    "Only 25% of eighth graders score proficient in geography on standardized tests. Some teachers are using a video chat game to engage kids in the world around them."
John Evans

Teaching Students With ODD (Oppositional Defiant Disorder) - 2 views

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    "Joe's teacher, Ms. Watkins, is feeling frustrated. For the fourth time today, the second grader has flatly refused to do as she asks … and it's not even lunchtime yet. The last request, that Joe put away the book he is reading and take out his math assignment, escalated until the he was on the floor screaming and kicking. Ms. Watkins has had meeting after meeting with Joe's parents, but all they can say is that Joe argues like this at home, too. Things seem to be at an impasse until the school counselor suggests Joe might be one of many students with ODD-oppositional defiant disorder."
John Evans

This Teacher Makes Financial Literacy Personal for Students | EdSurge News - 2 views

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    "Jacqueline Prester was a self-proclaimed hustler in middle school. Mowing lawns, babysitting-she took the initiative to earn her own money. But she was also a responsible moneymaker, using the envelope system to budget every cent before she knew it was an actual budgeting strategy. Back then, her friends rolled their eyes when she tried to share her financial savvy. Fast forward two decades and Prester is a popular business and technology teacher at Mansfield High School in Massachusetts, working to give students real-life financial skills. Only this time her audience is keen to learn. (Her Personal Finance classes always reach their 28 student capacity.) Students are learning about personal finance, but not just because that's the name of the class. They're making it personal. Prester's passion is infectious, and the content she chooses-like Pathway To Financial Success created by Discovery Education and Discover-immerses students in authentic lessons with videos, interactive modules and real-world connections. Pathway To Financial Success Video: Being Financially Responsible EdSurge caught up with Prester to find out how she packs her classes with willing learners and to uncover her secret to finding compelling financial literacy content. She also shared how and why she helped pass a new Massachusetts bill focused on financial literacy."
Nigel Coutts

In Postnormal Times our Students need to be Brave - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    If we are to cultivate the dispositions required in these times of postnormality and post-truth we need to establish cultures in our classrooms which will allow them to thrive. 
John Evans

Giving students more music, theater, and dance boosts writing scores (and compassion), ... - 1 views

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    "When you're the big fish, it's not OK to pick on the little fish just because you can. That's an important lesson for everyone. But some Houston first-graders got a particularly vivid demonstration in the form of a musical puppet show, which featured fish puppets and an underlying message about why it's wrong to bully others. The show left an impression on the students at Codwell Elementary, according to their teacher Shelea Bennett. "You felt like you were in that story," she said. "By the end of the story they were able to answer why [bullying] wasn't good, and why you shouldn't act this way." The puppeteer's show was part of an effort to expand arts education in Houston elementary and middle schools. Now, a new study shows that the initiative helped students in a few ways: boosting students' compassion for their classmates, lowering discipline rates, and improving students' scores on writing tests. It's just the latest study to find that giving students more access to the arts offers measurable benefits. And adding time for dance, theater, or visual arts isn't at odds with traditional measures of academic success, according to the research - which amounts to one of the largest gold-standard studies on arts education ever conducted. "Arts learning experiences benefit students in terms of social, emotional, and academic outcomes," write researchers Dan Bowen of Texas A&M and Brian Kisida of the University of Missouri. The study, released Tuesday through the Houston Education Research Consortium, looked at elementary and middle schools - which predominantly served low-income students of color - that expressed interest in participating in Houston's Arts Access Initiative. There appeared to be significant need: nearly a third of elementary and middle schools in the district reported lacking a full-time arts teacher."
John Evans

Students Should Share Their Process, Not Just Their Product - John Spencer - 4 views

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    "When you show your work, you are forced to communicate what you did and how you did it in a way that others understand. It becomes a chance to reflect on your work but also clarify misconceptions and catch any blind spots. If you look at the entire metacognition cycle mentioned in the video, you'll notice that the last part of metacognition is the reflection piece. When students are sharing their journey, they are more reflective on their process and better able to plan a new approach in the future."
John Evans

When Am I Ever Going to Use This? | Edutopia - 0 views

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    "High school students ask this question partly to challenge the teacher's authority, but they may really want to know the answer. "
John Evans

How LEGO is a Great Toy for Stress Relief for Students During Exam Times - 0 views

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    "Students undergo a lot of pressure when exams are around the corner. It can be quite a challenge to focus on the task at hand in such a state of mind. This article is going to look at how students can relieve stress by playing with LEGO during exam times. People normally consider LEGO just a toy, however, it is so much more than just a toy. It exercises your brain and gives you many benefits as a result. Rather than watching cartoons on TV and tablets most of the time, engaging in LEGO can prove to be such an excellent utilization of time and energy."
John Evans

Game-Based Learning: Preparing Students for The Future | EdSurge Guides - 2 views

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    "Two decades in, and it's abundantly clear that one of the most effective ways to nurture the 21st century's trademark skills-creativity, critical thinking, communication, collaboration-is by creating opportunities for kids to do what kids do naturally: play. So we've crafted this educators' guide to game-based learning, packed with resources for gaming gurus and greenhorns alike."
John Evans

5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Unmotivated Students | Cult of Pedagogy - 0 views

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    "When I ask teachers what their biggest struggles are, one issue comes up on a regular basis: student motivation. You are able to reach many of your students, but others are unreachable. No matter what you try, they have no interest in learning, no interest in doing quality work, and you are out of ideas. For a long time, I had no solutions; the problem was too complex. I have had my own unmotivated students, and I never had any magic bullets for them. Still, the issue kept coming up from my readers. So I decided to do some research, to try to find what the most current studies say about what motivates students. This is what I found:"
John Evans

Getting Students to Take Control | Getting Smart - 1 views

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    "For centuries, the majority of kids who attend school do so for one reason: it is mandatory. Think back to when you were in school, now envision you were offered the following choices: You master the material and receive a low grade You don't understand the material and receive a high-grade Which would you choose? Sure, some would rather master the material, but the majority would aim for the higher grade. In order to transform the learning process from standardization to personalization, we need to help students shift their view of school away from focusing on grades to focusing on their personal self-growth. We need to show them they are not just there because they have to be."
John Evans

What Kids Need to Learn to Succeed in 2050 - Youth, Now - Medium - 0 views

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    "In such a world, the last thing a teacher needs to give her pupils is more information. They already have far too much of it. Instead, people need the ability to make sense of information, to tell the difference between what is important and what is unimportant, and, above all, to combine many bits of information into a broad picture of the world."
John Evans

Helping Students See Hamlet and Harry Potter in a New Light With Computational Thinking... - 1 views

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    "Like many kids of my generation growing up in India, I was an avid reader of Enid Blyton's novels. Many of her books were written as a series ("The Famous Five," "The Secret Seven" and "Five Find-Outers") and I recall wondering if the lives of characters overlapped in any way. Did a character from one series ever run into one from another, for example? I recall wondering the same thing in later years about P.G. Wodehouse's Blandings Castle and Jeeves series. Today, in a world where communities real and imagined are digitally connected via platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr, we can reframe that question in terms of those common nodes (or friends) in those characters' social networks. As it turns out, network theory as an analytic technique, or what I'd call computational literary analysis, is not just a bona fide research endeavor. It's also a great example of how computational thinking (CT) is truly a cross-disciplinary skill that can be weaved to enrich learning in any subject (not just math and science, as is sometimes the assumption). In an earlier article on computational thinking, I offered teasers of how CT could be integrated into language arts and social studies, in addition to math and science. Here's a detailed treatment of one of those examples, drawn from the work of Franco Moretti's group on "Computational Criticism," which is part of the broader Digital Humanities initiative at Stanford. (See this New York Times profile for more on the work of this group)."
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