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John Evans

Jobs at All Levels Now Require Digital Literacy. Here's Proof. - Education Week - 1 views

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    "Newark, Del.

    It's no secret that American workplaces are becoming more reliant on technology.

    But what may surprise the country's K-12 educators and policymakers is how work at nearly every rung of the employment ladder is becoming more digitized. Often, the skills needed to succeed have less to do with computer programming than what experts call "digital literacy"-the ability to interpret, create, and strategically use digital information.

    "Everyone's job is changing," said Mark Muro, a senior fellow and policy director at the Brookings Institution, a think tank. "The ability to read and then conduct first-order analysis of digital information is highly valued in almost all work environments."

    To better understand the central role of digital literacy in the workplace, Education Week took a deep look at four occupations in the Christiana Care Health System. It's the largest private employer in Delaware, with 11,600 employees and an expected 1,500 new hires this year."
John Evans

The Makers of Tomorrow - Dale Dougherty - Medium - 4 views

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    "Now that we have more ways for students to get into making, we also need to explore the potential outcomes for those who become makers. We're hosting our first-ever Industry, Career and College Day in partnership with Cornell University College of Engineering and San Mateo College. The speakers on the program will talk about preparing for the future of work. It will also be an opportunity for young people to meet representatives from startups, companies, colleges and universities, to explore career paths, and evaluate new possibilities for their education and future."
John Evans

Will Robots Take Our Children's Jobs? - The New York Times - 1 views

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    "Like a lot of children, my sons, Toby, 7, and Anton, 4, are obsessed with robots. In the children's books they devour at bedtime, happy, helpful robots pop up more often than even dragons or dinosaurs. The other day I asked Toby why children like robots so much.

    "Because they work for you," he said.

    What I didn't have the heart to tell him is, someday he might work for them - or, I fear, might not work at all, because of them.

    It is not just Elon Musk, Bill Gates and Stephen Hawking who are freaking out about the rise of invincible machines. Yes, robots have the potential to outsmart us and destroy the human race. But first, artificial intelligence could make countless professions obsolete by the time my sons reach their 20s."
John Evans

The new industrial revolution: robots are an opportunity, not a threat - 1 views

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    "Invasion. Takeover. These are the kind of words that have been bandied about in news headlines about robotics and artificial intelligence in the last few years. The coverage has been almost relentlessly negative, focusing on the threat to jobs, squeezing out the human component. While such potential is there, if robotics and AI do become a threat, then we believe this would be a threat of society's own choosing."
John Evans

10 jobs that didn't exist 10 years ago | World Economic Forum - 6 views

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    "In 2006, Facebook was in its infancy, Twitter was being launched, and nobody had iPhones. Ten years on, the world is a very different place, and so is the workplace.

    Jobs exist now that we'd never heard of a decade ago. One estimate suggests that 65% of children entering primary school today will ultimately end up working in completely new job types that aren't on our radar yet.

    This pace of change is only going to get faster thanks to rapid advances in the fields of robotics, driverless transport, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, advanced materials and genomics, according to the World Economic Forum's latest annual Human Capital Index.

    From Uber drivers to millennial generation experts, here's a selection of 10 occupations that weren't around in 2006"
John Evans

5 robots that are about to revolutionize the workforce - and put jobs at risk - 0 views

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    "When it comes to productivity, humans don't come close to robots. Machines don't need sleep, won't slack off or ask for a raise and generally don't need vacation days so they can sunbathe in Bali.

    According to a study from Oxford University and the Oxford Martin School, 47% of jobs in the United States are "at risk" of becoming "automated in the next 20 years." PwC has similar findings, estimating that 38% of U.S. jobs are at risk of being replaced by robots and artificial intelligence in the next 15 years. And while two-thirds of Americans believe robots will take over most of the workforce in the next 50 years, they're also in denial: 80% say their job will "probably" or "definitely" be around in five decades.

    Here are five robots that are coming to take some jobs from unsuspecting humans:

    "
John Evans

Coding may not be all it's cracked up to be when it comes to getting a job in the futur... - 1 views

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    "Coding is, apparently, the new language we all need to learn. It's billed as essential by the likes of Bill Gates and Stephen Hawking.

    General Motors CEO Mary Barra calls coding a "core skill" that you need to learn if you want a high-paying job.

    But what if this emphasis on coding is distracting us from teaching kids about other, more important things that they'll actually need for the jobs of the future?

    Marina Gorbis, executive director of the Institute for the Future, sees this obsession with coding as the equivalent of putting all our eggs into one basket."
John Evans

5 Ways Teachers Can Have a Work-Life Balance - STEM JOBS - 3 views

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    "Educators never get a break. Oftentimes they see their students in their community, grade papers and plan lessons, and become emotionally invested in the lives of each of their students - all outside of classroom hours. Children of teachers can sometimes feel they rank below their parents' other "kids" at times. To avoid burnout and keep yourself happy at work and at home, remind yourself that teachers can have a work-life balance and follow these tips for creating it."
John Evans

Coding, Robotics and the Jobs of the Future - The Tech Edvocate - 0 views

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    "Since as early as the 1800's, fears of robots taking over human jobs has been a reality. As we enter the true age of robotics, those concerns are resurfacing, and educators are unsure about what jobs their students will be competing for. For example, IT jobs will grow by 22% through 2020 and jobs in STEM are said to see similar growth. Educators are expected to equip their students with skills that will translate into careers and yet they have no idea what these skills should be. While timeless skills such as critical thinking, languages and mathematics aid in every career they do not provide the specialized skills that "jobs of the future" may require. So, what are the jobs of the future and how can be best prepare students for them?"
John Evans

Best jobs in America in 2017 - Business Insider - 5 views

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    "Every January, Glassdoor publishes its list of the best jobs of the year. For the second year in a row, the top spot goes to data scientist. 

    "This report reinforces that the best jobs are highly-skilled and are staying ahead of the growing trend toward workplace automation," Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor's chief economist, tells Business Insider. He explains that the skills helping workers stay ahead of automation are creativity, judgment, and flexibility."
John Evans

Tell Kids to Get Good at Stuff Smart Machines Can't Do (Yet) - 1 views

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    ""AI won't obliterate jobs, but it will transform jobs," said Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us.

    Pink said he's told his own kids to "think about what you can do to augment what AI does-work that only humans can do that smart machines cannot." That includes:

    creativity;
    dealing with ambiguity, nuance and poorly defined problems;
    understanding other's emotions and point of view;
    Developing expertise and sense making; and
    Identifying reliable sources.
    "
John Evans

How Minecraft and Duct Tape Wallets Prepare Our Kids for Jobs That Don't Exist Yet | Ed... - 0 views

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    "My objective with this wide-ranging set of skills, and involving the community so closely in their development, is to give kids the chance to practice whatever makes them passionate now and feel encouraged -- even if they're obsessed with making stuff exclusively with duct tape. It's crucial that kids learn how to be passionate for the rest of their lives. To start, they must first learn what it feels like to be simultaneously challenged and confident. It's my instinct that we should not try to introduce these experiences through skills we value as much as look for opportunities to develop them, as well as creativity and literacy, in the skills they already love.

    MAGICIANS CRAFT ILLUSIONS THAT BAFFLE THE SENSES AND CONFUSE OUR REASONING. THEY PLAN LIKE SCIENTISTS, BUT PERFORM AS ARTISTS. ONLY THROUGH LONG AND DISCIPLINED PREPARATION DO THEY SUCCEED.
    It's difficult to predict which skills will be valuable in the future, and even more challenging to see the connection between our children's interests and these skills. Nothing illustrates this better than Minecraft, a popular game that might be best described as virtual LEGOs. Calling it a game belies the transformation it has sparked: An entire generation is learning how to create 3D models using a computer. Now, I wonder, what sort of businesses, communication, entertainment or art will be possible? Cathy Davidson, a scholar of learning technology, concluded that 65% of children entering grade school this year will end up working in careers that haven't even been invented yet. I bet today's kids will eventually explore outcomes and create jobs only made possible by the influence of Minecraft in their lives. Why take any chances and build your dream house with blueprints alone? The Minecraft kid could easily make a realistic 3D model of one for you to walk through before you build. That's why DIY treats Minecraft as a tool, not a game, and encourages our members to use it to pursue art, architect
Admission Times

LIC & GIC Insurance Examinations 2014 - 0 views

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    The exams are conducted from May - July 2014. Following are exam details - Like & Share - www.facebook.com/theadmissiontimes
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