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rhondamatrix

Limiting Structural Stress for Online Learners - LimitingStructuralStressforOnlineLearn... - 1 views

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    This article by Matthew Putz discusses ideas for course structuring that will help students better navigate the course. Sound theories at work here!
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    This article by Matthew Putz discusses ideas for course structuring that will help students better navigate the course. Sound theories at work here!
rhondamatrix

Which BLANK Are You? Quiz Creator - 0 views

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    This is a tool I found to design your own personality quiz, like the Buzzfeed quizzes we see on Facebook. I'd like to try this out!
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    This personality quiz tool is one I'd like to try using as an icebreaker in my "The World of Dr. Seuss" course.
rhondamatrix

'Which (blank) are you?' Online personality quizzes go viral on social medi...: Univers... - 0 views

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    I am trying to find research (if it exists) on the academic value of online personality quizzes. This article, which appeared in several Canadian newspapers, discusses what is so compelling about this social media trend.
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    I am curious, can you folks read this article? I am posting the link as it appeared in the SUNY Albany library, and since we are SUNY Albany students, it should work, right? A couple of folks said so on the discussion board ...
rhondamatrix

Market Your Brand, Create Personality Quizzes - 0 views

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    I suspect that to actually use this "make your own personality quiz" application, there will be money involved, but I thought it was worth checking out anyway...
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    After listening to Prof. Pickett's presentation and thinking about effective icebreakers, I thought I'd really like to learn how to make a Buzzfeed-style personality quiz. This website might do the trick.
aperr1

E-LEARNING AND STUDENTS' MOTIVATION.: EBSCOhost - 0 views

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    Focuses on student motivation in online learning as well as strategies to help increase student motivation. 
Irene Watts-Politza

ETAP640amp2012: Student-Centered Learning Requires a Happy Medium - 2 views

  • n order for true student centered learning to occur, learners must be guided in a particular direction to reach desired outcomes that are standards-driven and curricula aligned; to me, it seems that the student-centered part comes in the process and not the product of the learning.
    • alexandra m. pickett
       
      brilliant!
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    This observation answers the question, "How do educators satisfy local, state, and national requirements while still implementing a student-centered approach to learning?"
Gary Bedenharn

Athabasca University : Canada's Leader in Online & Distance Education - 0 views

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    Online and distance education They have done research on access education to the people with disability.
Joan McCabe

Effective Online Instructional and Assessment Strategies - 1 views

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    Describes effective online teaching strategies and forms of assessment. Lists benefits of online learning and assessments.
sschwartz03

Getting the Mix Right Again: An Updated and Theoretical Rationale for Interaction | And... - 2 views

shared by sschwartz03 on 22 Jun 12 - Cached
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    Research of six types of interaction that can lead to a meaningful" distance education experience.
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    An article on interaction in educational settings.
b malczyk

Online Social Interchange, Discord, and Knowledge Construction.pdf (application/pdf Obj... - 0 views

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    Offers definitions for social and critical constructivism.
Catherine Strattner

The problem with Bloom's taxonomy | On Teaching Online - 0 views

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    Is there a problem with Bloom's Taxonomy and 21st century learning?
Catherine Strattner

Applying Bloom's Taxonomy to teach thinking skills in e-learning « Jen e-blogger - 0 views

  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
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  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • 4. ANALYSIS: This level is defined as the ability to break down material to identify its components and to analyze its organizational structure and content. E- Learning activities that focus on scaffolding thinking at this level includes those that guide students to identify different components of a particular object, to better appreciate the relationships between the parts. It requires students to identify different aspects of a process to appreciate the working principle behind the process.
  • guide students to arrive at a certain concept, rule, principle or method and use the concept, rule, principle or method in a workplace or simulated workplace environment.
  • require students to construct a new product from the components given or apply different aspects of their prior learning to put together a product.
  • require students to critic or review materials or ideas.
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    This blog post outlinse different learning activities that address the different levels of Bloom's Taxonomy.
Maria Guadron

Intelligent avatar on e-learning using facial expression and haptic - 0 views

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    Basori, Tenrieawaru, and Mansur (2011) describe virtual humans in a virtual environment as an interface that can "make harmonious relationships between the human and the computer" (p.115). This is why they are interested in creating facial expressions, voice intonation, and hand gestures to express complex human emotion.
diane hamilton

E-Learning 2.0: Learning Redefined, Rupesh Kumar A. - 0 views

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    discussion of the evolution of web 1.0 through web 2.0 learning and online training and instruction
Irene Watts-Politza

Minds on Fire - 0 views

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    Course Document referring to need of expanding the online learning environment
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    Online education and the technology to bring it to life for students.
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    University for GenNext... what will it be like? How will we meet the demand?
Irene Watts-Politza

Tips on How to Create Killer Blog Posts Using Your Web TVs - 1 views

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    Lisa, I thought this might help in future with developing web presence for Uzuri. Catherine, would this be helpful with your metacognition website?
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    Thanks Irene! I like the idea of using my webcam to answer frequently asked question as mentioned in this video. I'm also thinking I could film an short informational video about Club Uzuri to attach to the facebook page. What else were you thinking?
Irene Watts-Politza

E Pedagogy - 2 views

  • <div class="outer_page only_ie6_border " id="outer_page_6" style="width: 679px; height: 961px;"><div class="newpage" id="page6" style="width: 902px; height: 1276px; display: block; -moz-transform: scale(0.752772); -moz-transform-origin: left top;"> <div class="text_layer" style="z-index: 2;"><div class="ie_fix"> &nbsp; <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 57px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 2318px; top: 287px; word-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">E-Pedagogy: Does e-learning require a new pedagogy?</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 3830px; top: 276px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;</span><span class="a" style="left: 3689px; top: 6035px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">5</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 100px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 571px; word-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">The emergence of e-learning</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 661px; top: 710px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;As part of the <span class="w6"></span>technological revolution, the use of e-learning, or blended learning, is</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 815px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">increasing. This is particularly true <span class="w6"></span>of Higher Education, which offers <span class="w6"></span>most programmes</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 919px; word-spacing: -2px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">partly or wholly online. In the future, e-learning is likely to be more <span class="w6"></span>widely used in the</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1025px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">tertiary and school sectors. Another driver for e-learning is <span class="w6"></span>life-long learning, which</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1129px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">requires on-going training and re-training of <span class="w6"></span>the adult workforce.</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1310px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">In many cases, e-learning is delivered through a <span class="w7"></span>virtual learning environment (VLE),</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1415px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">which is a custom built environment designed for online <span class="w6"></span>learning. VLEs, such as</span></div> <div class="ff1" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="g" style="top: 1519px;"><span class="a" style="left: 661px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;Blackboard</span></span> </div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 1106px; top: 1519px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">and</span></div> <div class="ff1" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 1259px; top: 1519px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Moodle</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 1512px; top: 1519px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">, typically provide all of <span class="w7"></span>the software tools required for online</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1624px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">learning such as communication and file <span class="w8"></span>sharing facilities. These environments are often</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1729px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">modelled around the <span class="w6"></span>traditional campus, providing ‘virtual staff rooms’ and ‘online</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1834px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">common rooms’. E-portfolios provide the digital equivalent to the <span class="w6"></span>traditional paper</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 1939px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">portfolio; these typically provide online storage for a <span class="w7"></span>range of media types (such as</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 2043px; word-spacing: 4px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">drawings, photos and videos). Dedicated e-assessment systems, such as</span></div> <div class="ff1" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 3200px; top: 2043px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Questionmark</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 3696px; top: 2043px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">,</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 2148px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">facilitate large-scal<span class="l6">e online testing, providing many of <span class="w7"></span>the question types that are</span></span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 2253px; word-spacing: -5px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">familiar to teachers.</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 2433px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Some academics have pointed out
  • changing learning landscape poses fundamental epistemological questions about thenature of knowledge and how it is acquired. Dede (2008) writes: “In the Classicalperspective, knowledge consists of accurate interrelationships among facts, based onunbiased research that produces compelling evidence about systematic causes […]Epistemologically, a single right answer is believed to underlie each phenomenon […]The epistemology that leads to validity of knowledge in Web 2.0 media such as
    Wikipedia
     is peer review from people seen, by the community of contributors, as having unbiasedperspectives. Expertise involves understanding disputes in detail and proposingsyntheses that are widely accepted by the community
  • hatever new theory of learning emerges in thenext decade, it will likelybuild upon thesepedagogie
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  • <div class="outer_page only_ie6_border " id="outer_page_9" style="width: 679px; height: 961px;"><div class="newpage" id="page9" style="width: 902px; height: 1276px; display: block; -moz-transform: scale(0.752772); -moz-transform-origin: left top;"><div class="text_layer" style="z-index: 2;"><div class="ie_fix"><div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 2845px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">George Siemens introduced this theory in his <span class="w6"></span>paper</span></div> <div class="ff1" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 2506px; top: 2845px; word-spacing: -5px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Connectivis<span class="l6">m: Learning <span class="w6"></span>as network</span></span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 2950px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">creation</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 984px; top: 2950px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">(2004) to address “the shortcomings of <span class="w6"></span>behaviouris<span class="l6">t, cognivitist and</span></span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3054px; word-spacing: -10px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">constructiv<span class="l6">ist <span class="w9"></span>ideologies”.</span></span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3235px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Connectivism conceptualis<span class="l6">es knowledge and <span class="w6"></span>learning as a network, <span class="w6"></span>consisting of nodes</span></span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3340px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">and connections. Knowledge, at any point in time, <span class="w6"></span>is a particular (probably temporary)</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3444px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">configuration of nodes and connections (a <span class="w7"></span>sub-netw<span class="l6">ork). Learning creates new</span></span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3550px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">connections between existing nodes (changes to existing <span class="w6"></span>knowledge) and/or creates new</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3654px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">nodes (entirely new knowledge). Learning, therefore, is about network (node and</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3759px; word-spacing: -8px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">connection) creation.</span><span class="a" style="left: 682px; top: 3940px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">His theory differentiates between data, information, knowledge and <span class="w6"></span>meaning:</span></div> <div class="ff2" style="font-size: 28px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 818px; top: 4143px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">•</span></div> <div class="ff4" style="font-size: 76px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 853px; top: 4102px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="ff0" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 955px; top: 4122px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Data</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 1143px; top: 4122px; word-spacing: -2px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">: raw elements</span></div> <div class="ff2" style="font-size: 28px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 818px; top: 4295px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">•</span></div> <div class="ff4" style="font-size: 76px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 853px; top: 4254px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="ff0" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 955px; top: 4273px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Information</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 1433px; top: 4273px; word-spacing: -3px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">: data with intelligence applied</span></div> <div class="ff2" style="font-size: 28px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 818px; top: 4446px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">•</span></div> <div class="ff4" style="font-size: 76px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 853px; top: 4405px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="ff0" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 955px; top: 4425px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Knowledge</span></div> <div class="ff3" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 1393px; top: 4425px; word-spacing: -4px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">: information in <span class="w6"></span>context and internalised</span></div> <div class="ff2" style="font-size: 28px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 818px; top: 4598px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">•</span></div> <div class="ff4" style="font-size: 76px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 853px; top: 4557px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="ff0" style="font-size: 72px;"> <span class="a" style="left: 955px; top: 4577px; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(65, 71, 81);">Meaning</spa
  • Rote learning of factual information, which typifies behaviourism, isvalueless when students are one click away from Google and Wikipedia. The “teacher-knows-best” idiom of cognivitism is questionable in a time of “the wisdom of the crowd”.The constructivist approach (and, particularly, social constructivism) appears to be abetter fit for 21st century learning – but needs to be updated to embrace the modernlearning environment that includes virtual worlds such as Second Life. ‘Connectivism’,‘E-moderating’, ‘E-Learning 2.0’ and ‘Assessment 2.0’ may not provide the answer – butdo highlight the problems with the status quo and emphasise the need for a newapproach to teaching, learning and assessment
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    "Does e-learning require a new approach to teaching and learning?"
    This is an interesting paper about pedagogical approaches to e-learning and e-teaching. Do you believe we need a new approach for online learning? What is your pedagogical approach to e-learning and e-teaching?
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    What is your pedagogical approach to e-learning and e-teaching?
Diane Gusa

ISETL : International Society for Exploring Teaching and Learning - 0 views

  • Presentation Objectives are to:
    1) Educate faculty on the pedagogical uses of avatars in the online classroom, 2)Provide an opportunity for participants to practice developing their own avatar and 3)Promote interest and improve confidence in using avatars as part of established learning activities and spark generation of new ideas.


    Presentation Audience: Faculty who desire to see improvement in the richness of their students’ online experiences will find this presentation interesting and beneficial. Faculty who have never considered using or developed their own avatars will find practical assistance.

    Presentation Activities: In this highly interactive session, participants with laptop computers will have the opportunity to create and publish an avatar, which can be posted on their faculty webpage or other Web 2.0 forum. The facilitator will also present avatars developed by undergraduate students as part of a class project and will invite participants to generate ways that they can use this medium in own classrooms.

    Description: Avatars have typically been associated with gaming, recreation and entertainment, and most recently were the central characters in a hugely successful blockbuster movie. Their use in learning environments is much less popular, although it is growing. A central definition has not emerged, although the following are generally accepted: “a digital representation
  • Online instructors lament some of the same problems expressed by their students, not the least of which is the feeling of disconnection in the learning environmen
  • Allmendinger, K. (2010). Social presence in synchronous virtual learning situations: the role of nonverbal signals displayed by avatars. Educational Psychology Review, 22(1), 41-56
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  • The social presence created by avatars may diminish some of these negative factors
  • Falloon, G. (2010). Using avatars and virtual environments in learning: What do they
    have to offer? British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 108-122.
Diane Gusa

eLearning Reviews: Identifying the pitfalls for social interaction in computer-supporte... - 0 views

  • The article then discusses a number of educational techniques for avoiding these two pitfalls, including building more measures that support positive interdependence, individual accountability, and collaborative skills; increasing opportunities for the socio-emotional and affective exchanges between learners; adjusting the instructor’s and the learners’ role for CSCL environments; and increasing social presence, i. e. reducing the perceived distance between learners.
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