Skip to main content

Home/ ETAP640/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by Lauren D

Contents contributed and discussions participated by Lauren D

Lauren D

Ensuring Effective Communication in the Online Environment - 0 views

  •  
    Interaction in a distance learning environment is a key factor in the success of the course. Students may feel apprehensive about using the technology in a web-based class... Incorporating interactive strategies early in the course helps the student overcome these misgivings, and can also serve to unite the students so that they see themselves as part of a whole. Social interaction, especially between students, can complement instructional interactivity goals.
Lauren D

Benefits of Peer-Based Learning.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

  •  
    Forums, online communities, and professional networks are these new learning environments, where people find and share information, collaborate and learn on demand. A significant challenge is to motivate people to participate in the knowledge-sharing and learning process. Especially in peer-based learning environments, where learning depends on the effort of all participants, it is essential to provide enough incentives to participate and share information with others." Implementing systems fostering trust through reputation can enhance the learning effectiveness, and provide alternatives for the traditional pedagogical approaches still in place in current e-learning courses. Formal education could profit from such new learning environments adopting these pedagogical approaches and related technical systems."
Lauren D

Outline of American Geography - America.gov - 0 views

  • Themes and Regions The Physical Environment Foundations of Human Activity Megalopolis The Manufacturing Core The Bypassed East Appalachia and the Ozarks The Deep South The Southern Coastlands The Agricultural Core: The Deep North The Great Plains and Prairies The Empty Interior Southwest Border Area California The North Pacific Coast The Northlands Hawaii
  •  
    This site is great! A lot of good information I can use when teaching about US geography and regional misconceptions.
Lauren D

LTTO Episodes | COFA Online Gateway - 1 views

    • Lauren D
       
      It was interesting to see the different points-of-view and contrasting ideas on how faculty view online teaching and managing time online.
  •  
    Managing your time when teaching online. Faculty reactions to teaching online and the debate on whether it is time saving or not.
Lauren D

Scaffolding and Achievement in Problem-Based and Inquiry Learning: A Response to Kirsch... - 0 views

  •  
    "Scaffolding makes the learning more tractable for students by changing complex and difficult tasks in ways that make these tasks accessible, manageable, and within student's zone of proximal development."
Lauren D

Engagement_Rubric.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 1 views

  •  
    Engagement Rubric for Instructors to go over during their course development
Lauren D

USIA - An Outline of American Geography - Contents - 0 views

shared by Lauren D on 11 Jul 12 - Cached
    • Lauren D
       
      Pages I want to use: -Themes and Regions -The Deep South -The Great Plains and Prairies -The Southwest Border Area -Major US Cities -Maps (Comments on each of these)
Lauren D

Theory_and_Practice_of_Online_Learning - 0 views

  •  
    The effective online learning teacher makes provision for negotiation of activities, or even content, to satisfy unique learning needs. As they become more informed participants and consumers of formal education, learners are also demanding increased input into the control of their learning
Lauren D

Online Teaching Challenge: Creating an Emotional Connection to Learning, part 1 - Facul... - 0 views

  • Browse Topics Faculty Focus Articles September 28, 2010 Online Teaching Challenge: Creating an Emotional Connection to Learning, part 1 By: Rob Kelly in Online Education Add Comment Learning research indicates that people learn better in the presence of some emotional connection—to the content or to other people. Creating this emotional connection is particularly challenging in the online classroom, where most communication is asynchronous and lacks many of the emotional cues of the face-to-face environment. Nevertheless, it is possible to do, with a learner-centered approach to teaching and a mastery of the technology that supports it, says Rick Van Sant, associate professor of education at Ferris State University. “One of the things we know about learning is that learning with emotion is a far deeper experience than learning without emotion,” Van Sant says. Citing recent research (see reference below), Van Sant notes that a little bit of stress and the corresponding release of cortisol makes “neural connections grow thicker, stronger, faster.” However, too much cortisol degrades memory performance. Creating an emotionally stimulating environment is something good face-to-face instructors do intuitively. “We live and thrive on the positive feedback from students. Students shape our behavior all the time. When technology is mediating between the learners and me, I lose the capacity to read my audience, engage my audience, and alter my style and cadence. I have no capacity on that kind of intuitive level [in the online classroom]. It all has to be intentional and cognitive,” Van Sant says.
  • Creating an emotionally stimulating environment is something good face-to-face instructors do intuitively. “We live and thrive on the positive feedback from students. Students shape our behavior all the time. When technology is mediating between the learners and me, I lose the capacity to read my audience, engage my audience, and alter my style and cadence. I have no capacity on that kind of intuitive level [in the online classroom]. It all has to be intentional and cognitive,” Van Sant says.
Lauren D

Direct Instruction: Targeting Strategies for Student Success - 1 views

  •  
    "The exemplary model of direct, explicit instruction consists of five phases that allow teachers to scaffold instruction, gradually shifting and releasing responsibility for completing a task from themselves to students." 1. Orientation 2. Presentation 3. Structured Practice 4. Guided Practice 5. Independent Practice
Lauren D

Strategies for motivating students / Engaging and motivating students / Facilitating / ... - 0 views

  • communicate with your students, right from the start, what will be required of them as an online learner
  • encourage students to seek help when they don't understand something about how the course is facilitated or course content
  • Guest presenters The advantage of the online learning means that guest presenters can be located anywhere throughout the world. This potentially increasing their availability, flexibility and quality.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Blogs There are numerous ways to integrate blogs into an online course. For example, recording a learning experience over a period of time. Students can also review and compare other students' blogs and draw their own conclusions about particular topics.
  • Non - computer based activities Just because an online course is online does not necessarily mean that all learning has to occur in front of the computer screen. Activities can be developed that require students to engage in the physical environment.
Lauren D

Teaching critical thinking through online discussions. - 0 views

  •  
    -Small group discussions- led by the instructor (Good way to start out a course to scaffold these principles) -Buzz groups- which allows two students to discuss an issue -Case discussions- using real or simulated complex problems to be analyzed in detail -Debating teams- where students improve their critical thinking skills by formulating ideas, defending their positions, and countering the opposition's conclusions -Jigsaw groups- students break up into subgroups to discuss various parts of a topic and then come together to present it or teach it to other classmates -Mock trials- students assume different roles in a trial setting
Lauren D

Preparing Instructors for Quality Online Instruction - 1 views

shared by Lauren D on 12 Jun 10 - Cached
  • The major concerns are centering on the following questions: What will be the new role for instructors in online education? How will students' learning outcomes be assured and improved in online learning environment? How will effective communication and interaction be established with students in the absence of face-to-face instruction? How will instructors motivate students to learn in the online learning environment?
  • Instructors have many concerns about online education. Their primary concern is how online education changes their roles and responsibilities, and how they can adapt to this change. Online education is widely accepted as student-centered education, and the traditional education is regarded as professor-centered education. Due to a shift to online education, the instructor's role has become more of a facilitator than a traditional lecturer. Therefore, the traditional professor-centered educational environment and student-centered online educational environment will have many differences. Besides their role shifting, the role of the virtual instructor is to select and filter information for student consideration, to provide thought-provoking questions, and to facilitate well-considered discussion (Kettner-Polley, 1999).
  • Clark (2002) pointed out that online learner must be a constructivist learner. This suggests that the learner must be active in the process, cognitively complex and motivated. According to Clark , motivating factors in the learning process include self-reference, personal goals, control and autonomy . Howland & Moore's (2002) study examined 48 students' experiences in online environments. Their results confirmed that the students who were the most positive in their perceptions of online learning were those with attributes consistent with constructivist learners. The most positive students were more independent, proactive and responsible for their learning.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Alley and Jansak (2001) have also identified 10 keys to quality online learning. The authors suggested that online courses will be high quality when they are student-centered and when: Knowledge is constructed, not transmitted. Students can take full responsibility for their own learning. Students are motivated to want to learn. The course provides “mental white space” for reflection. Learning activities appropriately match student learning styles. Experiential, active learning augments the Web site learning environment, Solitary and interpersonal learning activities are interspersed. Inaccurate prior learning is identified and corrected. “Spiral learning” provides for revisiting and expanding prior lessons, The master teacher is able to guide the overall learning process. (p. 6-17)
Lauren D

The Future of Education - YouTube - 1 views

  •  
    YouTube Video on the future of online learning
Lauren D

Ben_Online.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

  •  
    Students share perspectives Online forums, provide public areas to post information. Each student can view another student's answers and learn through the exposure to different perspectives. This benefits students because they can combine new opinions with their own, and develop a solid foundation for learning. Research supports that "as learners become aware of the variations in interpretation and construction of meaning among a range of people [they] construct an individual meaning, " (Alexander, 1997). Students experience a sense of equality-Another benefit to using web-based communication tools is to give all students a reinforced sense of equality. Each individual has the same opportunity to "speak up" by posting messages without typical distractions such as seating arrangements, volume of student voices, and gender biases. Shy and anxious students feel more comfortable expressing ideas and backing up facts when posting online instead of speaking in a lecture room. Studies prove that online discussions provoke more confrontational and direct communication between students.
Lauren D

Distance Learning: Promises, Problems, and Possibilities - 0 views

  • Bates (1995) suggests that newer technologies are not inherently better than old ones and many of the lessons learned from the application of older technologies will still apply to any newer technology. Again, the instructor should be trained to take advantage of both their experience and being able to adapt that experience to the new environment of distance learning.  The instructors must be trained “not only to use technology, but also to shift the way in which they organize and deliver material” (Palloff & Pratt, 2000, pg. 3). 
  • In a 1995 study, Olenski et al., found that technicians could indirectly influence the learning environment by “orientating participants to the technology, reducing the anxiety of the participants” (including the instructor), “and by advising the instructor on instructional techniques”(pg. 3).  This type of role, if viewed negatively by the instructor, can have a huge impact on the quality of the presentation, yet many times the instructor and the technicians do not meet until the initial class meeting
  • The technology will undoubtedly keep improving and the price will drop, as technology is prone to do once it comes into general use.  Already we see improvement in the delivery systems of compressed video and computer assisted instruction.  Despite student problems with distance learning, studies indicate they are relatively satisfied with what they are receiving.
  •  
    Bates (1995) suggests that newer technologies are not inherently better than old ones and many of the lessons learned from the application of older technologies will still apply to any newer technology. Again, the instructor should be trained to take advantage of both their experience and being able to adapt that experience to the new environment of distance learning. The instructors must be trained "not only to use technology, but also to shift the way in which they organize and deliver material" (Palloff & Pratt, 2000, pg. 3).
Lauren D

SLN Knowledge Base - Knowledge Base - Welcome to Confluence - 0 views

  •  
    "SLN Knowledge Base"
1 - 20 of 40 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page