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tainoathompson16

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world - 0 views

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    We may sometimes think of body language as universal but in some cases, that is not true. This list shows some of the interesting cultural differences between body language throughout the world.
victoriamak15

Researchers say bilingual people can have different personalities in each language | Da... - 0 views

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    Study researched difference between English and German language speakers and found that people thought differently depending on language being used.  
victoriamak15

Learning a language in later life: are you ever too old? | Education | The Guardian - 0 views

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    Study examined the medical records of 648 Alzheimer's patients in Hyderabad and found that bilinguals developed dementia four to five years later than monolinguals. 
tainoathompson16

Why learn a foreign language? Benefits of bilingualism - 0 views

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    Learning a foreign language has many more benefits than you would think. This article highlights many of the cognitive benefits associated with learning a foreign language.
nickykyono15

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/our-first-language-now-languishes-somewhere-between-s... - 0 views

This article talks about how the Irish language is being used and understood by fewer and fewer people. It also talks about what the government is doing to fix the problem.

language

started by nickykyono15 on 20 Mar 15 no follow-up yet
amywestphalen15

Swifty Teaches Apple's New Programming Language On Your iPhone - 1 views

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    Last summer, Apple surprised almost everyone at WWDC with the announcement of Swift, a new programming language for iOS and Mac development. The language feels like something Apple would invent. Like several of the languages currently popular in web development, it has a concise, readable syntax that's easier to pick up than Apple's older language, Objective-C.
Lara Cowell

The Problem With 'Fat Talk' - 0 views

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    In a 2011 survey, Renee Engeln, Professor of Psychology at Northwestern University and a colleague found that more than 90 percent of college women reported engaging in fat talk - despite the fact that only 9 percent were actually overweight. In another, 2014 survey, she canvassed thousands of women ranging in age from 16 to 70. Contrary to the stereotype of fat talk as a young woman's practice, she found that fat talk was common across all ages and all body sizes of women. Engeln notes that fat talk is not a harmless social-bonding ritual. According to an analysis of several studies published in 2012 in the Psychology of Women Quarterly, fat talk was linked with body shame, body dissatisfaction and eating-disordered behavior.

    Engeln also found that fat talk was contagious. She ran an 2012 experiment where young women, "confederates" secretly working for the researchers, joined two other young women seated at a table to discuss magazine advertisements. The ads started out innocently enough. One was for an electronics store. Another was for a water purifier. But the third was a typical fashion ad showing a model in a bikini.

    In the control condition, confederates commented on the visuals in the background of the fashion ad, but avoided any mention of the model or her appearance. In the "fat talk" condition, the two confederates (neither of whom was overweight) commented on the model. One said: "Look at her thighs. Makes me feel so fat." The other responded: "Me, too. Makes me wish my stomach was anywhere near flat like that."

    Then it was our subjects' turn. In the control condition, when neither of our confederates engaged in fat talk, none of our subjects fat talked. But when our confederates engaged in fat talk, almost a third of the subjects joined in. These subjects also reported higher levels of body dissatisfaction and shame at the end of the study than did their counterparts in the control condition.
abae15

How a dialect differs from a language - 0 views

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    Two kinds of criteria distinguish languages from dialects. The first are social and political: in this view, "languages" are typically prestigious, official and written, whereas "dialects" are mostly spoken, unofficial and looked down upon. In a famous formulation of this view, "a language is a dialect with an army and a navy". Speakers of mere "dialects" often refer to their speech as "slang", "patois" or the like.
jamelynmau16

Hand Gestures Linked To Better Speaking - 1 views

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    Can't find the right word? You might want to start moving your hands. New research at the University of Alberta suggests that gesturing while you talk may improve your access to language. Dr. Elena Nicoladis and her research colleagues observed the hand gestures of bilingual children as they told the same story twice, first in one language and then the other.
nicktortora16

The Language of Lies - 0 views

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    Despite contrary belief, there are not many tip-offs to whether or not someone is lying. There are not usually any clear indicators that can tell you right off the bat if someone is lying. There are different pieces to be put together. There is a whole language to lying and understanding what liars say is just the first step.
Lara Cowell

A Man's Incomplete Brain Reveals Cerebellum's Role in Thought And Emotion - 1 views

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    Since his birth 33 years ago, Jonathan Keleher has been living without a cerebellum, a structure that usually contains about half the brain's neurons. Besides playing a vital role in balance and fine motor control, the cerebellum is also actively involved in higher functions, like using language, reading maps and planning. Emotional complexity is a challenge for Jonathan, says his sister, Sarah Napoline. She says her brother is a great listener, but isn't introspective. "He doesn't really get into this deeper level of conversation that builds strong relationships, things that would be the foundation for a romantic relationship or deep enduring friendships," she says.

    Jonathan also needed to be taught a lot of things that people with a cerebellum learn automatically, Sarah says: how to speak clearly, how to behave in social situations and how to show emotion.

    Yet Jonathan is now able to do all of those things. He's done it by training other areas of his brain to do the jobs usually done by the cerebellum.
nicktortora16

Spotting Lies: Listen, Don't Look - 0 views

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    Contrary to popular belief, liars don't actually give many visual giveaways to their lies. The better cues are in their speech. The common misconceptions about liars and their body language are actually signs of anxiety. More often than not, truth-tellers are assumed to be liars because they are anxious to recount the correct details
amywestphalen15

Babies Can Follow Complex Social Situations - 1 views

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    Infants can make sense of complex social situations, taking into account who knows what about whom, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. "Our findings show that 13-month-olds can make sense of social situations using their understanding about others' minds and social evaluation skills," says psychological scientists and study authors You-jung Choi and Yuyan Luo of the University of Missouri.
srafto16

Sorry seems to be the easiest word - 2 views

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    Connotation of sorry is changing.
srafto16

Mind your language! Swearing around the world - 2 views

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    Briefly explores the difference of "swear" words and their severity across the globe.
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    For curses to have impact, they need a dominating societal power and control structure attached to them. Strong language often involves naming things you desire but aren't supposed to desire; at the very least, it aims to upset power structures that may seem a bit too arbitrary.

    We tend to think of swear words as one entity, but they actually serve several distinct functions. Linguist Steven Pinker, in The Stuff of Thought, lists five different ways we can swear: descriptively, idiomatically, abusively, emphatically, and cathartically.

    Worldwide, words for genitalia are the most common focus of preferred strong language, the kind used by default for Pinker's five functions.
caitlingreen15

Bird Brains - 0 views

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    This article and video explains how recent research on bird brains could give us clues as to how human language evolved.
caitlingreen15

Speaking Two Languages May Slow Brain Aging - 1 views

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    This article discusses how being able to speak multiple languages can slow down the speed at which your brain ages.
Lara Cowell

This Is What It's Like To Be Awake During Brain Surgery - 0 views

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    The recent advent of brain-mapping technology-which allows doctors to create a precise digital replica of a person's brain cartography--has made more surgeons comfortable with the concept of keeping patients awake while they operate. This article profiles a woman, Brittany Capone, who's having open-brain surgery to remove a tumor that's dangerously close to a region in the brain that controls speech and the ability to comprehend language. By doing the operation while she is awake and speaking, her surgeon, Dr. Philip Gutin, can figure out exactly where the offending growth ends and the area of the brain called the Wernicke's center begins. This way, Gutin can see how close he can cut without permanently affecting his patient's ability to talk. What neurosurgeons are learning through mapping and documenting their experiences is also informing general knowledge about where brain structures are located and the slightly different positions they can take in different people.
kfricke

How 'Girl Talk' Like, Changes The Way We All Speak - 2 views

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    Discusses how teenagers (especially girls) change language.
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