Skip to main content

Home/ Groups/ Words R Us
Lara Cowell

Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth | The Inde... - 0 views

  •  
    The project, called Celebrating Indigenous Languages, is designed to honour the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages. Users of Google Earth are now able to hear over 50 Indigenous language speakers from across the globe saying words and simple phrases and even singing traditional songs.
Lara Cowell

Jeffrey Epstein and the Myth of the 'Underage Woman' - The Atlantic - 0 views

  •  
    The article, which is about serial sexual predator and businessman, the late Jeffrey Epstein, also explores the media's use of the term "underage woman" and the socially-sanctioned sexism behind the term: a way to lessen the seriousness of pedophilia and abuse.
Lara Cowell

Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages? - John McWhorter - YouTube - 0 views

  •  
    Linguist John McWhorter examines 3 fictional constructed languages, also known as conlangs, and explains the features that make them bona fide languages, including the presence of grammar/syntax and the fact that they evolve and change over time.
blaygo19

Scotch Snaps in Hip Hop - YouTube - 0 views

  •  
    Talks about how rhythmic characteristics of language and accents are reflected in the rhythms of songs.
  •  
    In a 2011 published study (https://mp.ucpress.edu/content/29/1/51.full.pdf+html), Nicholas Temperley and David Temperley, 2 musicologists, did a musical corpus analysis showing that the Scotch snap, a sixteenth-note on the beat followed by a dotted eighth-note, is common in both Scottish and English songs, but virtually nonexistent in German and Italian songs, and explored possible linguistic correlates for this phenomenon. British English shows a much higher proportion of very short stressed syllables (less than 100 ms) than the other two languages. Four vowels account for a large proportion of very short stressed syllables in British English, and also constitute a large proportion of SS tokens in our English musical corpus. A Scotch snap, as Adam Neely notes in the above video, is the musical, rhythmical counterpart to a trochee in poetry. Say the phrase "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" to hear a series of Scotch snaps.
Lara Cowell

Mock Spanish: A Site For The Indexical Reproduction Of Racism In American English - 0 views

  •  
    An interesting scholarly sociolinguistic paper! Jane H. Hill, a University of Arizona linguist, examines the use of mock Spanish phrases In the southwestern United States. Hill wondered why English speakers of ``Anglo" ethnic affiliation make considerable use of Spanish in casual speech, in spite of the fact that the great majority of them are utterly monolingual in English under most definitions. However, these monolinguals both produce Spanish and consume it, especially in the form of Mock Spanish humor, and that use of Mock Spanish intensified during precisely the same period when opposition to the use of Spanish native speakers has grown, reaching its peak in the passage of ``Official English'' statutes in several states during the last decade. Hill argues that the use of Mock Spanish is, in fact, racist discourse.
Lara Cowell

Why My Novel Uses Untranslated Chinese | Literary Hub - 0 views

  •  
    Taiwanese-American writer Esme Wang reflects on the untranslated use of other languages in literature which is otherwise written in English. By making the linguistic choice to use untranslated Chinese in a novel geared for an English-reading audience, she hopes her readers will be able to relate to characters, yet also experience the nuances and complexities of inhabiting a space where difficulty in communication is its own kind of trauma.
Lara Cowell

Do Not Disturb: How I Ditched My Phone and Unbroke My Brain - 0 views

  •  
    Food for thought: " A few weeks ago, the world on my phone seemed more compelling than the offline world - more colorful, faster-moving and with a bigger scope of rewards. I still love that world, and probably always will. But now, the physical world excites me, too - the one that has room for boredom, idle hands and space for thinking. I no longer feel phantom buzzes in my pocket or have dreams about checking my Twitter replies. I look people in the eye and listen when they talk. I ride the elevator empty-handed. And when I get sucked into my phone, I notice and self-correct. It's not a full recovery, and I'll have to stay vigilant. But for the first time in a long time, I'm starting to feel like a human again."
Lara Cowell

How New Emoji Are Changing the Pictorial Language - The Atlantic - 0 views

  •  
    As emoji have become more specific in both their appearance and their meaning, their ideographic flexibility has eroded. Emoji are transforming into a large catalog of fixed portraits, rather than a smaller set of flexible ideograms.
Lara Cowell

Ready For A Linguistic Controversy? Say 'Mmhmm' : Code Switch : NPR - 0 views

  •  
    Tracing the linguistic path of mmhmm, and many other words commonly used today, from West Africa to the U.S. South is difficult, is riddled with controversy - and experts say it has lingering effects on how the speech of African-Americans is perceived. In a 2008 documentary, Robert Thompson, a Yale professor who studies the effect of Africa on the Americas, said the word spread from enslaved Africans into Southern black vernacular and from there into Southern white vernacular. He says white Americans used to say "yay" and "yes." However, other historians and linguists disagree.
Lara Cowell

"Love Letters": Couples and Exes Read Written Expressions of Vulnerability - The Atlantic - 0 views

  •  
    This is a video link to Tara Fallaux's short documentary "Love Letters," from the Amsterdam-based production company HALAL Films. Fallaux trains the camera on various couples as they read each other heartfelt letters and openly discuss their relationship. We also hear from single people, who read letters they wrote to ex-lovers while reflecting on the trials and tribulations of these life-changing relationships. Love Letters is an intimate rumination on the project of love-and, ultimately, the virtues of vulnerability.
Lara Cowell

How Do People Communicate Before Death? - The Atlantic - 0 views

  •  
    Article discusses the findings of researchers who've documented and categorized the utterances of the dying (morbid, but true!) Author Michael Erard notes that more research should be done in this area, because "Even basic descriptions of language at the end of life would not only advance linguistic understanding but also provide a host of benefits to those who work with the dying, and to the dying themselves. Experts told me that a more detailed road map of changes could help counter people's fear of death and provide them with some sense of control. It could also offer insight into how to communicate better with the dying. Differences in cultural metaphors could be included in training for hospice nurses who may not share the same cultural frame as their patients."
ronanwitherwax19

This linguist studied the way Trump speaks for two years. Here's what she found. - The ... - 0 views

  •  
    This article was very interesting because it analyzed the way President Trump delivers his speeches. The linguist talks about how many perceive the way he talks as "uneducated", however, this is not the case. He speaks the way he does because he wants to talk like a normal person and therefore be relatable to everyday Americans.
braydenhee19

Inside J.R.R. Tolkien's Notebooks, a Glimpse of the Master Philologist at Work - 1 views

shared by braydenhee19 on 12 Dec 18 - No Cached
  •  
    the article is about how J.R.R. Tolkien, the creator of the Lord of the Rings created the languages used in his books and films. He created the elvish language from scratch! the man created a whole language.
braydenhee19

Watch Beatboxers Break It Down Inside an M.R.I. Scanner - 0 views

shared by braydenhee19 on 12 Dec 18 - No Cached
  •  
    the article is about how people were studying to see what parts of the mouth and throat beat boxers use to make their sounds. The article tells the reader that beat boxing requires creativity and the ability to learn and retain new techniques The process of learning how to beatbox is very similar to learning a language.
Dylan Okihiro

Chris Wallace: 'A chill' descended on front row upon Trump arrival at Bush fu... - 0 views

  •  
    "You had seen a lot of chatty talk between the Clintons and the Obamas, the Carters. But when Donald Trump sat down, the greeting that he was given by Barack Obama and Michelle Obama was about as cool as it could have been." Trump's encounter with living members of the 'Presidents Club' serves as a fascinating study for those in the media and academia. From a social psychology standpoint, the cold and ignorant reactions from the former presidents and first ladies towards the current president specifically acknowledged an 'uninvited' member was intruding upon the ingroup.
jhiremath19

Swearing Is Actually a Sign of More Intelligence - Not Less - Say Scientists - 0 views

  •  
    The more you swear the more intelligent you may be. According to this study, there is a direct correlation between advanced language skills and a high use of swear words.
jhiremath19

Go ahead, curse in front of your kids - Los Angeles Times - 0 views

  •  
    This article talks about the misconception of swearing in front of your kids. Kids do not seem to be affected by swearing unless it is a racial slur.
ronanwitherwax19

Storytelling Enhances the Influence of Science-Based Writing | Psychology Today - 0 views

  •  
    In this article, it talks about the psychology behind storytelling. For many of us, when reading over an informational article, we happen to miss a lot of facts and we tend to "glaze over it" without retaining much of what was said. This is very common and psychologists have found that subtly putting information in to a story will increase the reader/listener's chances of learning the material. A prime example of this was done by the University of Washington when hinting at climate change in the form of a story.
lmukaigawa19

A word in your ear: The art of making ourselves heard | The Independent - 0 views

  •  
    This article states that humans judge people by their voices. It is something that we all do because we cannot help it. The author touches upon Shakespearean plays to elaborate his argument for why tone of voice does in fact matter.
lmukaigawa19

How Donald Trump is making racist language OK again | The Independent - 0 views

  •  
    Typically, politicians do not openly express racist statements because it simply is not okay. However, Donald Trump's racism is found all over the media. But, to some, it seems okay because it is covered up with a "racial figleaf," which is "an additional utterance which provides just enough cover for an utterance that would otherwise be seen as clearly racist."
1 - 20 of 3251 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page