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anonymous

"augmented reality" robot interactive storytelling preschool kindergarten - Google Scholar - 1 views

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    Google Scholar Search Results limited Since 2010
anonymous

Robot-Aided Learning and r-Learning Services | InTechOpen - 1 views

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    "R-Learning services include learning activities that utilize a direct physical experience, such as chanting and dancing (Kanda et al., 2004; Han et al., 2009a; Yujin, 2008), and learning that uses teaching props such as toys (Yujin, 2008; Movellan et al., 2009), and that delivers multi-media contents through a touch screen (Han et al., 2005; Han and Kim, 2006; Hyun et al., 2008). This final type of activity for delivery of multi-media contents can sub-divided into two categories: class management and class instruction (Han et al., 2009a). Class instruction can further be sub-divided into contents delivery type (Han et al. 2005; Han and Kim, 2006; Hyun et al., 2008) and participatory type through augmented virtuality (Han et al., 2009b), depending on the participation of the learners."
anonymous

Supporting augmented reality based children's play with pro-cam robot - 0 views

  • The study has found that robot-assisted AR based play showed improved learning effects, compared to the conventional play, in language and creativity and this is attributed to the operational flexibility, novelty, robotic mediation and capturing the attention of the children. The result was also made possible in part by designing an effective interface for the teachers to control the robots and manage the simultaneously occurring tasks.
anonymous

Casper - Socially Assistive Humanoid Robot - YouTube - 0 views

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    I am not sure how this socially assistive robot designed for cognitively impaired older adults to improve independent living would be received in an early childhood classroom setting. But the level of artificial intelligence programming is impressive and intriguing.
anonymous

IEEE Xplore Abstract - The RUBI/QRIO Project: Origins, Principles, and First Steps - 0 views

  • Computers are already powerful enough to sustain useful robots that interact and assist humans in every-day life. However progress requires a scientific shakedown in goals and methods not unlike the cognitive revolution that occurred 40 years ago.
  • The document presents the origin and early steps of the RUBI/QRIO project, in which two humanoid robots, RUBI and QRIO, are being brought to an early childhood education center on a daily bases for a period of time of at least one year. The goal of the RUBI/QRIO project is to accelerate progress on everyday life interactive robots by addressing the problem at multiple levels, including the development of new scientific methods, formal approaches, and scientific agenda.
anonymous

Nao the Amazing Robot - YouTube - 1 views

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    I think this humanoid robot is the one to watch with more than 300 universitie in 30 countries using NAO for Research and Education.
anonymous

Storytelling Theory and Practice - YouTube - 0 views

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    Sturm argues that storytelling provides something larger: a way of organizing information. He says we can look at these characteristics as dots of data on a screen, where the story is the way we connect the dots. And how we connect the dots, changes the kinds of stories we create. Storytelling ethics and the need for trust and truth are discussed. Comments include his Story Listening Experience Model http://ils.unc.edu/~sturm/storytelling/storyexperience.pdf I wonder if this model could be used to create better programming routines for socially interactive storytelling robots? I have no idea how it would be possible to create a script for conveying ethics and the need for trust and truth using artificial intelligence. I think such activities require mediation by authoritative human participants to connect the dots and to establish a teaching presence that can address issues of ethics, trust, and truth for the listening audience upon reflection. I can easily see teachers, parents, caregivers "remix" what a storytelling robot presents to facilitate deeper reflection by young children in early childhood classrooms.
anonymous

Pepper the Robot: Tech News Today 1022 - YouTube - 0 views

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    This "humanoid robot" has lots of sensors, facial recognition, voice recognition, articulate hands. Design company claims to be able to read and express human emotions. Suggested plans are to use robot for babysitting and storytelling with young children. I wonder whether young children left alone with a robot limited to artificial intelligence would respond positively or would be frightened or upset without the presence of a parent, caregiver, or teacher to mediate their interactions with the robot. I imagine an early childhood classroom would be highly entertained and their attention stimulated by the presence of this humanoid robot. But I can't imagine having this robot replace responsible teaching or caregiver staff with the social interactions presented in this video. Based on Alan Kay's comments that computer artifacts are meta-medium that need to go beyond demonstrations and build artificial intelligence for specific user groups and age-appropriate curriculums, I will review the literature about interactive storytelling with socially assistive robots in early childhood classrooms.
mjminutoli

Facebook Will Gather More User Information, but Offer More Control Over Ads | CIO - 0 views

  • Facebook will use the information gathered from all those sources to identify its users' interests and match them with advertising, as it already does with information about their onsite activities.
  • A screenshot illustrating the function showed that clicking on one corner of the ad will drop down a menu allowing users to select one of four options: "I don't want to see this," "Hide all ads from this advertiser," "Why am I seeing this?" and "This ad is useful." Asking for more information will show the interest areas identified by Facebook to which the ad is related, allowing users to reject further ads associated with that interest.
  • Facebook will use the information gathered from all those sources to identify its users' interests and match them with advertising, as it already does with information about their onsite activities.
anonymous

Giorgio Bertini's Public Library | Diigo - 1 views

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    Recommend this Diigo Metacognition Multidisciplinary Annotated Bibliography about Learning Change http://gfbertini.wordpress.com/ ... some readings from multidisciplinary research on society, culture, critical thinking, neuroscience, cognition, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, rhizomes, emergence, self-organization, complexity, systems, networks, methods, thinkers, futures ...
anonymous

Embodied Cognition (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) - 0 views

  • Consider four evocative examples of phenomena that have motivated embodied cognitive science. We typically gesture when we speak to one another, and gesturing facilitates not just communication but language processing itself (McNeill 1992). Vision is often action-guiding, and bodily movement and the feedback it generates are more tightly integrated into at least some visual processing than has been anticipated by traditional models of vision (O'Regan and Noë 2001). There are neurons, mirror neurons, that fire not only when we undertake an action, but do so when we observe others undertaking the same actions (Rizolatti and Craighero 2004). We are often able to perform cognitive tasks, such as remembering, more effectively by using our bodies and even parts of our surrounding environments to off-load storage and simplify the nature of the cognitive processing (Donald 1991).
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    Thinking about embodied cognition in young children's dramatic play with robotic teachers and augmented reality.
anonymous

DARPA's Robot Olympics » Cyborgology - 0 views

  • Schraube’s materialized action approach combines Actor Network Theory with Critical Psychology. From the latter, Schraube uses the idea of objectification which argues that technology is always imbued with human intention. From the former, he takes the idea that technologies always act back upon humans. In short, the materialized action approach says that technologies and humans have a mutually constitutive relationship, but this relationship is lopsided. Although both humans and technologies each act upon the other, humans take the primary position. Humans construct technologies in response to human problems. They build into these technologies cultural values and intentions. Technology is the material form of human action, but one without definitive consequences.
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    See article link to Schraube's technology as materialized action approach and comments about automation of physical tasks vs automation of mental tasks.
anonymous

New Media Literacies - Learning in a Participatory Culture - 0 views

  • Simulation: the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processes. Being able to interpret, manipulate and create simulations can help you understand innumerable complex systems, like ecologies and computer networks – and make you better at playing video games!
  • Multitasking
  • Distributed Cognition: 
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  • Judgment: the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sources. If you’re worried about your students using Wikipedia at inappropriate times and taking everything they read on the internet as gospel truth, you’re worried that they aren’t exercising good judgment. But judgment also includes knowing when sources are appropriate for your use: for instance, sometimes Wikipedia might be the appropriate resource to use.
  • Visualization - the ability to translate information into visual models and understand the information visual models are communicating. VIsualization has become a key way we cope with large data sets and make sense of the complexity of our environment.
anonymous

Digital View news articles - Museum Interactive Displays - 0 views

  • Museums are increasingly using digital video presentation to engage with visitors. Moving away from traditional VHS and DVD delivery, new dedicated digital media players offer an extremely low cost, yet highly reliable option for all types of looping content. Digital View - a specialist in the provision of these solid state digital media players - has even added a range of low cost interactive options to its range of ViewStream™ & VideoFlyer™ digital presentation tools. Everything a museum needs; from buttons, levers and motion sensors, to touch screens, RS-232 and full AMX / Crestron connectivity. Interactivity that is simple to program, simple to integrate and fast-to-the-touch - ensuring the best visitor experience.`
anonymous

How the Internet of Things Changes Everything - Stefan Ferber - Harvard Business Review - 0 views

  • Clearly, when things are networked, that has an impact on how actual value is produced. In many cases, it is no longer the industrially manufactured product that is the focus, but rather the web-based service that users access through that device.
  • In many and diverse sectors of the global economy, new web-based business models being hatched for the Internet of Things are bringing together market players who previously had no business dealings with each other
  • The question for you is: in this new cyber-physical galaxy, will your company become a new sun, a planet, a minor moon — or be reduced to stardust?
anonymous

In the Programmable World, All Our Objects Will Act as One | Gadget Lab | WIRED - 0 views

  • what’s remarkable about this future isn’t the sensors, nor is it that all our sensors and objects and devices are linked together. It’s the fact that once we get enough of these objects onto our networks, they’re no longer one-off novelties or data sources but instead become a coherent system, a vast ensemble that can be choreographed, a body that can dance. Really, it’s the opposite of an “Internet,” a term that even today—in the era of the cloud and the app and the walled garden—connotes a peer-to-peer system in which each node is equally empowered. By contrast, these connected objects will act more like a swarm of drones, a distributed legion of bots, far-flung and sometimes even hidden from view but nevertheless coordinated as if they were a single giant machine.
  • For the Programmable World to reach its full potential, we need to pass through three stages. The first is simply the act of getting more devices onto the network—more sensors, more processors in everyday objects, more wireless hookups to extract data from the processors that already exist. The second is to make those devices rely on one another, coordinating their actions to carry out simple tasks without any human intervention. The third and final stage, once connected things become ubiquitous, is to understand them as a system to be programmed, a bona fide platform that can run software in much the same manner that a computer or smartphone can. Once we get there, that system will transform the world of everyday objects into a design­able environment, a playground for coders and engineers. It will change the whole way we think about the division between the virtual and the physical.
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