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anonymous

"augmented reality" robot interactive storytelling preschool kindergarten - Google Scholar - 1 views

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    Google Scholar Search Results limited Since 2010
anonymous

Robot-Aided Learning and r-Learning Services | InTechOpen - 1 views

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    "R-Learning services include learning activities that utilize a direct physical experience, such as chanting and dancing (Kanda et al., 2004; Han et al., 2009a; Yujin, 2008), and learning that uses teaching props such as toys (Yujin, 2008; Movellan et al., 2009), and that delivers multi-media contents through a touch screen (Han et al., 2005; Han and Kim, 2006; Hyun et al., 2008). This final type of activity for delivery of multi-media contents can sub-divided into two categories: class management and class instruction (Han et al., 2009a). Class instruction can further be sub-divided into contents delivery type (Han et al. 2005; Han and Kim, 2006; Hyun et al., 2008) and participatory type through augmented virtuality (Han et al., 2009b), depending on the participation of the learners."
anonymous

Supporting augmented reality based children's play with pro-cam robot - 0 views

  • The study has found that robot-assisted AR based play showed improved learning effects, compared to the conventional play, in language and creativity and this is attributed to the operational flexibility, novelty, robotic mediation and capturing the attention of the children. The result was also made possible in part by designing an effective interface for the teachers to control the robots and manage the simultaneously occurring tasks.
anonymous

Casper - Socially Assistive Humanoid Robot - YouTube - 0 views

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    I am not sure how this socially assistive robot designed for cognitively impaired older adults to improve independent living would be received in an early childhood classroom setting. But the level of artificial intelligence programming is impressive and intriguing.
anonymous

IEEE Xplore Abstract - The RUBI/QRIO Project: Origins, Principles, and First Steps - 0 views

  • Computers are already powerful enough to sustain useful robots that interact and assist humans in every-day life. However progress requires a scientific shakedown in goals and methods not unlike the cognitive revolution that occurred 40 years ago.
  • The document presents the origin and early steps of the RUBI/QRIO project, in which two humanoid robots, RUBI and QRIO, are being brought to an early childhood education center on a daily bases for a period of time of at least one year. The goal of the RUBI/QRIO project is to accelerate progress on everyday life interactive robots by addressing the problem at multiple levels, including the development of new scientific methods, formal approaches, and scientific agenda.
anonymous

Nao the Amazing Robot - YouTube - 1 views

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    I think this humanoid robot is the one to watch with more than 300 universitie in 30 countries using NAO for Research and Education.
anonymous

Storytelling Theory and Practice - YouTube - 0 views

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    Sturm argues that storytelling provides something larger: a way of organizing information. He says we can look at these characteristics as dots of data on a screen, where the story is the way we connect the dots. And how we connect the dots, changes the kinds of stories we create. Storytelling ethics and the need for trust and truth are discussed. Comments include his Story Listening Experience Model http://ils.unc.edu/~sturm/storytelling/storyexperience.pdf I wonder if this model could be used to create better programming routines for socially interactive storytelling robots? I have no idea how it would be possible to create a script for conveying ethics and the need for trust and truth using artificial intelligence. I think such activities require mediation by authoritative human participants to connect the dots and to establish a teaching presence that can address issues of ethics, trust, and truth for the listening audience upon reflection. I can easily see teachers, parents, caregivers "remix" what a storytelling robot presents to facilitate deeper reflection by young children in early childhood classrooms.
anonymous

Pepper the Robot: Tech News Today 1022 - YouTube - 0 views

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    This "humanoid robot" has lots of sensors, facial recognition, voice recognition, articulate hands. Design company claims to be able to read and express human emotions. Suggested plans are to use robot for babysitting and storytelling with young children. I wonder whether young children left alone with a robot limited to artificial intelligence would respond positively or would be frightened or upset without the presence of a parent, caregiver, or teacher to mediate their interactions with the robot. I imagine an early childhood classroom would be highly entertained and their attention stimulated by the presence of this humanoid robot. But I can't imagine having this robot replace responsible teaching or caregiver staff with the social interactions presented in this video. Based on Alan Kay's comments that computer artifacts are meta-medium that need to go beyond demonstrations and build artificial intelligence for specific user groups and age-appropriate curriculums, I will review the literature about interactive storytelling with socially assistive robots in early childhood classrooms.
George Neff

Ovid: External Link - 0 views

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    On the psychological effects of television
George Neff

Your Brain While Watching Orange Is the New Black - Shape Magazine - 0 views

  • Like a perfectly addictive drug, almost every aspect of the television viewing experience grabs and holds your brain’s attention, which explains why it’s so tough to stop watching after just one (or three) episodes of Orange is the New Black.
  • Characters run or shout or shoot accompanied by sound effects and music. No two moments are quite alike. To your brain, this kind of continuously morphing sensory stimulation is pretty much impossible to ignore, explains Robert F. Potter, Ph.D., director of the Institute for Communication Research at Indiana University.
  • “Our brains are hardwired to automatically pay attention to anything that’s new in our environment, at least for a brief period of time,” he explains. And it’s not just humans; all animals evolved this way in order to spot potential threats, food sources, or reproductive opportunities, Potter says.
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  • “This also explains how you can sit in front of the TV and binge for hours and hours at a time and not feel a loss of entertainment,” he says. “You brain doesn’t have much time to grow bored.”
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Studies show that, by this point, most of your brain activity has shifted from the left hemisphere to the right, or from the areas involved with logical thought to those involved with emotion. There has also been a release of natural, relaxing opiates called endorphins, research indicates.
  • You’re noodle isn’t really analyzing or picking apart the data it’s receiving. It’s basically just absorbing. Potter calls this “automatic attention.” He says, “The television is just washing over you and your brain is marinating in the changes of sensory stimuli.”
  • At the same time, the content of your television show is lighting up your brain’s approach and avoid systems, Potter says. Put simply, your brain is pre-programmed for both attraction and disgust, and both grab and hold your attention in similar ways. Characters you hate keep you engaged just as much (and sometimes more) than characters you love.
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Like any addictive drug, cutting off your supply triggers a sudden drop in the release of those feel-good brain chemicals, which can leave you with a sense of sadness and a lack of energy, research shows. Experiments from the 1970s found that asking people to give up TV for a month actually triggered depression and the sense that the participants had “lost a friend.”
George Neff

Roche Holding Ltd. (ADR) (OTCMKTS:RHHBY) News: FDA Gives Roche Priority Review For Cerv... - 0 views

  • While viewers enjoy watching episodes of their favorite TV shows back-to-back, advertisers suffer because video-on-demand (VOD) providers do not want to alienate their viewers by running advertisements.
  • Critics say that the company’s reliance on subscriptions alone poses a problem, because an increase in price will translate into lost subscribers.
  • This loyal customer base can also be used to leverage the findings of a study by Annalect, – Omnicom Media Group’s marketing technology platform – which suggests that binge viewers don’t actually mind ads.
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  • The study also found that 21% of binge viewers say they remember the ads, compared to 10% of non-binge viewers.
  • Research shows that 80% of Generation Y, 68% generation X and 49% of baby boomers are likely to be binge viewers. In a survey, 826 out of 1,307 respondents above the age of 18, who watch televised content for more than five hours a week, were also binge viewers.
  • Research also shows that there is an opportunity for companies like Netflix, which can transcend the subscription-based model and incorporate advertisements in their sources of revenue. They can also come up with new pricing models and offer subscriptions with ads at lower rates.
Kathleen Hancock

How Your Nonprofit Can Accept Donations Online Right Now - 0 views

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    How nonprofits use the internet to receive donations
Kathleen Hancock

Greenpeace Fund | Consider the cost if we don't act now - 0 views

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    Greenpeace online donations
Kathleen Hancock

Whale Defenders | Greenpeace - 0 views

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    Greenpeace with whale info
andhearsonars

What happened to the expert curator? | Guardian Professional - 0 views

  • Within these contexts, the act of arranging objects, images or sounds into an order that may or may not have meaning has proliferated throughout the creative and cultural industries. The curator is now a producer: you might curate your Flickr feed, your mates playing records at a bar or an exhibition in your own apartment – a trend showcased by the Serpentine Gallery's co-director Hans Ulrich Obrist, a master orator of what he calls a "global dialogue… in space and time".
  • A space has now opened up – both physically and online – where anyone can give curating a go.
  • What, then, if we're looking in the wrong place for qualified, ground-breaking curators? Perhaps they are no longer in museums, galleries or cultural institutions, but instead in front of a screen – sociable and connected. Curating in the age of the internet is the act of responding to social and technological developments: their usability, instability and the various networks of communication in which they are presented online.
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  • Dealing with networks means that nothing is stable, everything is constantly moving in response to massive amounts of data
  • "Broadly accounting for any act where a person organises visual content on the internet in a way that creates meaning through the differences and similarities of their collected images."
  • relatively meaningless
  • 'digital curating'
  • "curating is now linguistically deluded beyond the point of return to an artistic context
  • people are creating meaning themselves – online, inside, outside
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