Skip to main content

Home/ OKMOOC/ Group items tagged connectivism

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Balthas Seibold

Learning by Sharing- How global communities cultivate skills and capacity through peer-... - 12 views

  •  
    This piece was published as part of the GIZ compendium "10 trends in open innovation" and talks about self-organized and connected peer-to-peer learning for sustainable human development worldwide. Might be of interest as additional resource for Module 11: Global Perspectives on Equity, Development, and Open Knowledge
  • ...2 more comments...
  •  
    There are lot of ways to learn nowadays, technology spreads and most of the time it adds to our knowledge thru the information we get. It can be thru our friends, research, or even a single click over the internet. Shared thoughts helps us to understand and accept more about the particular topic, freedom has its own process that could eventually produce a network to others.
  •  
    Now people become students and teachers depending on the topic. We can share information, skills . . . that answer the question of what we are and what we will go . . . Non-formal education is more and more important not only in an individual but also in the society. Technologies and Internet can help us to develop our identity (individual and global).
  •  
    Dear Pris, dear Jurado, thanks a lot for your comments. I like the ideas and I would particularly like to know more about the thought, that "freedom has its own process tht could eventually produce a network ...". Thanks and cheers, Your Balthas
  •  
    Thanks for sharing this great article! These topics are where I would like discussions about open access to start. We may be able to use that base of peer learning communities to think about all the other issues of open access in a new light.
Kim Baker

Cybergogue: A Critique of Connectivism as a Learning Theory - 7 views

  •  
    "Having explored a "learning theory" that George Siemens (2005; 2006a) and Stephen Downes (2005; 2007) developed for a networked and digital world called connectivism. Fascinating and extensive conversations in the blogosphere and in educational journals debate whether connectivism is a new learning theory or whether it is merely a digital extension of constructivism."
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    I think the table in the end of the post is very useful to compare the 4 learning theories: Behaviorism Cognitivism Constructivism Connectivis
  •  
    I agree, is a wonderful delineation.
  •  
    The article is great. I only have one observation, we always assume learning is all about connecting special nodes and sources of information but we forget that the opposite is also learning. When we disconnect our wrong nodes and sources of information in terms of beliefs and wrong information, I believe we are also learning.
Kim Baker

Digital Literacy, Information Literacy and Connectivism - 7 views

  •  
    "Have you ever wondered just what the difference is between digital and information literacy? Or how they are connected to each other? Those are important questions because for librarians, the conversation is almost always about information literacy, and digital literacy sometimes takes a backseat to that."
Kim Baker

Connectivism and Information Search Process (ISP) - 4 views

  •  
    "The development of the ISP as a conceptual framework is the result of more than two decades of empirical research that began with a qualitative study of secondary school students and the emergence of an initial model, that was verified and refined through quantitative and longitudinal methods of diverse library users and further developed in case studies of people in the workplace." Very interesting to compare this model developed by Kuhlthau with Siemen's model of Connectivism.
Kevin Stranack

The Landing: What is connectivism? - 1 views

  •  
    "'Connectivism' is a label for a family of related theories and models about learning in a networked age that recognize the implications of the network itself in supporting and playing a central role in such learning. These theories and models consolidate various ideas, facts and theories that relate to networked learning then make predictions and prescriptions as well as imply patterns that are a consequence of them. "
1 - 6 of 6
Showing 20 items per page