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Dvora Marina Brodsky

Global Alliance on Partnership on Media and Information Literacy - 0 views

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    GAPMIL is an international cooperation to ensure that all citizens have access to media and information competencies. This pioneering initiative was launched during the Global Forum for Partnerships on Media and Information Literacy (MIL) which took place from 26 to 28 June 2013.The forum was held under the theme "Promoting Media and Information Literacy as a Means to Cultural Diversity".
dudeec

How can students know the information they find online is true or not - 6 views

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    A good supplement to Module 10's core reading on ACRL's standards for information literacy for higher education, this 5-pager is a short article for middle and high school librarians and parents.
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    I think that is a really good point. I feel like sometime for myself,I don't really know whether the information that we have found online is true or not. There are tons information online and we can't filter them all out, instead i think we should have a better understand and sense of what we are searching online before we do research.
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    Very good information. Every child should be taught about this before project assignment given to them. Sothat they will concentrate on only positive results of search engine and ignore negative results
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    I agree that students need to have some background knowledge about the topic they research on internet. And then they may do qualitative research. I wouldn't speak about positive/negative search results, I would rather speak about true/false results.
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    As a student, I think I learn to filter out what is valid and invalid. Depending on the source, and the crediblity, and the references it uses, i think will help individuals fitler out what is true or not .
v woolf

Project Information Literacy (iSchool at University of Washington) - 3 views

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    "Project Information Literacy (PIL) is a large-scale, national study about early adults and their research habits, conducted in partnership with the University of Washington's iSchool." This website contains a wealth of knowledge about the literacy habits of students making the transition into university. In particular, check out the "publications" tab for some of the project's preliminary results, and both published and news articles on the topic. The site also contains links to other relevant resources on the same topic (in the "Practical PIL" tab).
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    I reviewed some of the videos for the PIL and was delighted by their message. Thanks for sharing. I wish I'd had known about this, or maybe that it had existed when I was making the transition.
rebeccakah

Beyond Literacy - 0 views

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    This is a project is a production that has come out of a graduate course at the iSchool at the University of Toronto that touches on information overload, literacy and their definition of "post literacy". It is touches on thee multiliteracy that was mentioned in the reading by Kapitzke, and goes beyond into headier stuff. Check out their Pinterest bibliography, and their new recent endeavor with a Beyond Literacy podcast.
Kim Baker

21st Century Information Fluency - 3 views

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    Information Fluency is the ability to locate digital information efficiently, evaluate it effectively and use it ethically.
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    It also needs to be noted that this model has been critiqued by Sanderson for not taking into account different cultural lenses, and is biased towards the West - this also applies to most models of IL..See more here: : http://www.if.ucf.edu/files/2011/06/JIF1Final.pdf
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    Hi, Kim, I have like this articles and think that the image of information fluency it is clear. Thank for sharing Julia
Kim Baker

Information Literacy and Cultural Heritage for Lifelong Learning - 0 views

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    Includes a full chapter on critical thinking and information evaluation, including taking into account cultural sensitivites: "Critical thinking and lifelong learning - The role of critical thinking and lifelong learning - Critical thinking skills and cultural sensitivities - Lifelong learning and learning styles - Concluding comments"
Kim Baker

The Baloney Detection Kit: Carl Sagan's Rules for Bullshit-Busting and Critical Thinking - 3 views

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    "Just as important as learning these helpful tools, however, is unlearning and avoiding the most common pitfalls of common sense. Reminding us of where society is most vulnerable to those, Sagan writes: In addition to teaching us what to do when evaluating a claim to knowledge, any good baloney detection kit must also teach us what not to do. It helps us recognize the most common and perilous fallacies of logic and rhetoric. Many good examples can be found in religion and politics, because their practitioners are so often obliged to justify two contradictory propositions.He admonishes against the twenty most common and perilous ones - many rooted in our chronic discomfort with ambiguity - with examples of each in action"
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    The 20 fallacies: "ad hominem - Latin for "to the man," attacking the arguer and not the argument (e.g., The Reverend Dr. Smith is a known Biblical fundamentalist, so her objections to evolution need not be taken seriously) argument from authority (e.g., President Richard Nixon should be re-elected because he has a secret plan to end the war in Southeast Asia - but because it was secret, there was no way for the electorate to evaluate it on its merits; the argument amounted to trusting him because he was President: a mistake, as it turned out) argument from adverse consequences (e.g., A God meting out punishment and reward must exist, because if He didn't, society would be much more lawless and dangerous - perhaps even ungovernable. Or: The defendant in a widely publicized murder trial must be found guilty; otherwise, it will be an encouragement for other men to murder their wives) appeal to ignorance - the claim that whatever has not been proved false must be true, and vice versa (e.g., There is no compelling evidence that UFOs are not visiting the Earth; therefore UFOs exist - and there is intelligent life elsewhere in the Universe. Or: There may be seventy kazillion other worlds, but not one is known to have the moral advancement of the Earth, so we're still central to the Universe.) This impatience with ambiguity can be criticized in the phrase: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. special pleading, often to rescue a proposition in deep rhetorical trouble (e.g., How can a merciful God condemn future generations to torment because, against orders, one woman induced one man to eat an apple? Special plead: you don't understand the subtle Doctrine of Free Will. Or: How can there be an equally godlike Father, Son, and Holy Ghost in the same Person? Special plead: You don't understand the Divine Mystery of the Trinity. Or: How could God permit the followers of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam - each in their own way enjoined to
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    Wonderful post, Kim! These are great guidelines alongside which to test ideas.
dudeec

Howard Rheingold's Rheingold University - 4 views

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    Rheingold puts his thoughts, videos,course syllabi on the skills to be network smart on this site. Here is his introduction: The future of digital culture-yours, mine, and ours-depends on how well we learn to use the media that have infiltrated, amplified, distracted, enriched, and complicated our lives. How you employ a search engine, stream video from your phonecam, or update your Facebook status matters to you and everyone, because the ways people use new media in the first years of an emerging communication regime can influence the way those media end up being used and misused for decades to come. Instead of confining my exploration to whether or not Google is making us stupid, Facebook is commoditizing our privacy, or Twitter is chopping our attention into microslices (all good questions), I've been asking myself and others how to use social media intelligently, humanely, and above all mindfully. This book is about what I've learned.
Kim Baker

UNESCO's Overview of Information Literacy Resources Worldwide 2nd ed. 2014-2015 - 2 views

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    Edited by Dr. F. Woody Horton, the second edition of the UNESCO sponsored publication, Overview of Information Literacy Resources Worldwide 2014-2015, is available for download.
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    Hi Kim, thanks for this report. The list of "resources" includes a list of names of people, their organizational affiliation and e-mail adress who happen to be active in the field of information literacy in the Netherlands. Those are the people I would like to reach out to in developing a Wikipedia Education Program. Find ways to embed Wikipedia assignments to students in for example information literacy courses.
Kim Baker

Digital Literacy, Information Literacy and Connectivism - 7 views

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    "Have you ever wondered just what the difference is between digital and information literacy? Or how they are connected to each other? Those are important questions because for librarians, the conversation is almost always about information literacy, and digital literacy sometimes takes a backseat to that."
Kim Baker

How a Simple Spambot Became the Second Most Powerful Member of an Italian Social Network - 5 views

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    "The surprising story of how an experiment to automate the creation of popularity and influence became successful beyond all expectation. Sometimes fascinating discoveries are made entirely by accident. This is a good example." This article shows how digital identify can be constructed and manipulated, leading to questions around authenticity. How many of us would have also been fooled by that Spambot? This example also reinforces why information literacy is now one of the most essential skills for the 21st century.
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