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dr tech

Exclusive: Qatar World Cup will be most heavily surveilled tournament in history - 0 views

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    "Local organisers say that their artificial intelligence [AI] programmes are so advanced that they can tell whether a spectator is angry from analysing facial expressions. The cameras are sufficiently powerful that they can zoom in and identify each spectator in every single stadium seat."
dr tech

Twitter has '50% chance' of major crash during World Cup, says insider | Twitter | The ... - 0 views

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    "Twitter stands a 50% chance of a major outage that could take the site offline during the World Cup, according to a recently departed employee with knowledge of how the company responds to large-scale events. The former employee, who was granted anonymity because of the sensitivity of what was discussed, has knowledge of the workings of Twitter Command Centre, the platform's team of troubleshooters who monitor the site for issues such as traffic spikes and data centre outages."
dr tech

'Full-on robot writing': the artificial intelligence challenge facing universities | Au... - 0 views

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    "Universities don't merely face essays or assignments entirely generated by algorithms: they must also adjudicate a myriad of more subtle problems. For instance, AI-powered word processors habitually suggest alternatives to our ungrammatical phrases. But if software can algorithmically rewrite a student's sentence, why shouldn't it do the same with a paragraph - and if a paragraph, why not a page? At what point does the intrusion of AI constitute cheating?"
dr tech

Can anyone avoid CCTV surveillance? We ask an expert | Social trends | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "You're nailing the problem: the tech sales people and the politicians are all on the same drug, which is "This tech is perfect", because it's cheaper than more police. There's a lawsuit in the US because a black man was wrongly arrested based on facial recognition. Tech companies need to be held to account. One company we focused on, Clearview AI, scraped social networks - collected images of people's faces and data from publicly available information - to create its software. Facial recognition relies on artificial intelligence. It needs to study faces. And only the government - the DVLA etc - and social networking companies have access to a lot of faces."
dr tech

The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World... - 0 views

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    "Growth, then, is the animating ideal behind the platforms these companies build, and 'persuasive technology' is the means of achieving this. The research this technology is built on draws on everything from dopamine studies to behavioural psychology and addiction analysis. Features galore have emerged to keep our attention, from the endless scroll to dark patterns, but one is more important than all others, according to Fisher: recommendation algorithms."
dr tech

AI is giving insurers godlike powers, says Sompo chief - 0 views

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    "Artificial intelligence and cutting-edge information evaluation software program imply that underwriters can now make predictions in regards to the climate, pure disasters and senile dementia that beforehand "only God knew about", the president of one in all Japan's largest insurance coverage corporations has claimed."
dr tech

When AI can make art - what does it mean for creativity? | Artificial intelligence (AI)... - 0 views

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    "Some are outraged at what they consider theft of their artistic trademark. Greg Rutkowski, a concept artist and illustrator well known for his golden-light infused epic fantasy scenes, has already been mentioned in hundreds of thousands of prompts used across Midjourney and Stable Diffusion. "It's been just a month. What about in a year? I probably won't be able to find my work out there because [the internet] will be flooded with AI art," Rutkowski told MIT Technology Review. "That's concerning.""
dr tech

Amazon enters the age of robots. What does that mean for its workers? | Amazon | The Gu... - 0 views

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    "Economists even have a term for it - the "lump of labor" fallacy. Innovation may destroy occupations but there is no fixed number of jobs and new ones take their place. Warehouse jobs, for example, replaced retail jobs as online shopping decimated shopping malls."
dr tech

Medical data hacked from 10m Australians begins to appear on dark web | World news | Th... - 0 views

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    "Nearly 10 million Australians have had their private health data hacked - with sensitive medical records detailing treatments for alcoholism, drug addictions, and pregnancy terminations already posted online - in a cyber-attack believed to have been coordinated from Russia."
dr tech

New Go-playing trick defeats world-class Go AI-but loses to human amateurs | Ars Technica - 0 views

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    "KataGo's world-class AI learned Go by playing millions of games against itself. But that still isn't enough experience to cover every possible scenario, which leaves room for vulnerabilities from unexpected behavior. "KataGo generalizes well to many novel strategies, but it does get weaker the further away it gets from the games it saw during training," says Gleave. "Our adversary has discovered one such 'off-distribution' strategy that KataGo is particularly vulnerable to, but there are likely many others.""
dr tech

TikTok's ties to China: why concerns over your data are here to stay | Data protection ... - 0 views

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    "Owned by the Chinese company ByteDance, TikTok's success - more than 1 billion users worldwide - is combining with well-established fears about social media's data collection practices and concerns over China's geo-political ambitions to generate a background hum of distrust about the app. "As the geopolitical situation changes I suspect we will see companies such as TikTok will continue to be treated with some caution in the west," says Alan Woodward, a professor of cybersecurity at Surrey University."
dr tech

How does TikTok's uncanny algorithm decide what you see? We tested it on three people |... - 0 views

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    "TikTok's algorithm is famously effective, yet hard to study. As part of the Guardian's special series on the platform's explosive rise, we tested how the algorithm treats different users. We wondered what would happen if three people - with varying ages, backgrounds, and familiarity with the platform - created new accounts and recorded what they saw."
dr tech

Invasive Diffusion: How one unwilling illustrator found herself turned into an AI model... - 0 views

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    "The post sparked a debate in the comments about the ethics of fine-tuning an AI on the work of a specific living artist, even as new fine-tuned models are posted daily. The most-upvoted comment asked, "Whether it's legal or not, how do you think this artist feels now that thousands of people can now copy her style of works almost exactly?""
dr tech

Scientists Increasingly Can't Explain How AI Works - 0 views

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    "There's a similar problem in artificial intelligence: The people who develop AI are increasingly having problems explaining how it works and determining why it has the outputs it has. Deep neural networks (DNN)-made up of layers and layers of processing systems trained on human-created data to mimic the neural networks of our brains-often seem to mirror not just human intelligence but also human inexplicability."
dr tech

Recognising (and addressing) bias in facial recognition tech - the Gender Shades Audit ... - 0 views

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    "What if facial recognition technology isn't as good at recognising faces as it has sometimes been claimed to be? If the technology is being used in the criminal justice system, and gets the identification wrong, this can cause serious problems for people (see Robert Williams' story in "Facing up to the problems of recognising faces")."
dr tech

Elon Musk declares Twitter 'moderation council' - as some push the platform's limits | ... - 0 views

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    "Among the most urgent questions facing Twitter in its new era as a private company under Elon Musk, a self-declared "free speech absolutist", is how the platform will handle moderation. After finalizing his takeover and ousting senior leadership, Musk declared on Friday that he would be forming a new "content moderation council" that would bring together "diverse views" on the issue."
dr tech

Iran's Secret Manual for Controlling Protesters' Mobile Phones - 0 views

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    "According to these internal documents, SIAM is a computer system that works behind the scenes of Iranian cellular networks, providing its operators a broad menu of remote commands to alter, disrupt, and monitor how customers use their phones. The tools can slow their data connections to a crawl, break the encryption of phone calls, track the movements of individuals or large groups, and produce detailed metadata summaries of who spoke to whom, when, and where. Such a system could help the government invisibly quash the ongoing protests - or those of tomorrow - an expert who reviewed the SIAM documents told The Intercept."
dr tech

Social Platforms Are Unprepared For Election Misinformation (VIDEO) - 0 views

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    "With just about four months until the 2022 midterm elections, misinformation experts, civil rights advocates and researchers are worried that social media companies are unprepared to deal with a potential onslaught of falsehoods about the election. "
dr tech

Content Moderation is a Dead End. - by Ravi Iyer - 0 views

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    "One of the many policy-based projects I worked on at Meta was Engagement Bait, which is defined as "a tactic that urges people to interact with Facebook posts through likes, shares, comments, and other actions in order to artificially boost engagement and get greater reach." Accordingly, "Posts and Pages that use this tactic will be demoted." To do this, "models are built off of certain guidelines" trained using "hundreds of thousands of posts" that "teams at Facebook have reviewed and categorized." The examples provided are obvious (eg. a post saying "comment "Yes" if you love rock as much as I do"), but the problem is that there will always be far subtler ways to get people to engage with something artificially. As an example, psychology researchers have a long history of studying negativity bias, which has been shown to operate across a wide array of domains, and to lead to increased online engagement. "
dr tech

After repeated warnings YouTube and Facebook continue to approve blatant disinformation... - 0 views

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    ""It's frankly shocking that these massive firms with the technological prowess they clearly have, are unable to weed out such blatant disinformation being pushed onto their users. In the case of Facebook, not once, not twice, but three times some of the same ads have been approved.""
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