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dr tech

YouTube is more likely to serve problematic videos than useful ones, study (and common ... - 0 views

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    "The streaming video company's recommendation algorithm can sometimes send you on an hours-long video binge so captivating that you never notice the time passing. But according to a study from software nonprofit Mozilla Foundation, trusting the algorithm means you're actually more likely to see videos featuring sexualized content and false claims than personalized interests."
dr tech

How DuckDuckGo makes money selling search, not privacy - TechRepublic - 0 views

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    "It's actually a big myth that search engines need to track your personal search history to make money or deliver quality search results. Almost all of the money search engines make (including Google) is based on the keywords you type in, without knowing anything about you, including your search history or the seemingly endless amounts of additional data points they have collected about registered and non-registered users alike. In fact, search advertisers buy search ads by bidding on keywords, not people….This keyword-based advertising is our primary business model. "
dr tech

Burner phones, fake sources and 'evil twin' attacks: journalism in the surveillance age... - 0 views

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    "I heard from one political dissident about a suspicious motorcycle parked in front of his London house. When the police checked it out, they found a wifi router connected to the bike's battery with the same name as his home's wifi. There's a name for this attack: "evil twin"."
dr tech

Tech firm hit by giant ransomware hack gets key to unlock victims' data | Cybercrime | ... - 0 views

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    "Ransomware analysts offered several possible explanations for why the master key has now appeared. It is possible Kaseya, a government entity, or a collective of victims paid the ransom. The Kremlin in Russia also might have seized the key from the criminals and handed it over through intermediaries, experts said."
dr tech

I know where your cat lives (privacy and metadata) ^JB - cs4fn - 0 views

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    "German Green party MP, Malte Spitz, went a step further and published 6 months of records kept (at the time by law) by his phone company about him. To emphasise how scary it was privacy-wise he published it in the form of a minute by minute interactive map, so anyone could follow his exact location (just like the phone company) as though in real time from the location metadata his phone was giving away all the time. The metadata was combined with his freely available social networking data, allowing anyone to see not just where he was but often what he was doing. Germany no longer requires phone companies to keep this metadata, but other countries have antiterrorist laws that require similar information to be kept for everyone. You can explore Malte's movements at (archived link: www.zeit.de/datenschutz/malte-spitz-data-retention) to get an idea of how your life is being tracked by metadata."
dr tech

Fifty people linked to Mexico's president among potential targets of NSO clients | Mexi... - 0 views

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    ""Mexico's capacity to spy on its citizens is immense. [And] it's extremely easy for the technology and the information obtained through the spyware to fall into private hands - be it organised crime or commercial," said Jorge Rebolledo, a Mexico City security consultant. "What we know about is only the tip of the iceberg." Andrés Manuel López Obrador Andrés Manuel López Obrador. The data leak is a list of more than 50,000 phone numbers that, since 2016, are believed to have been selected as belonging to people of interest by government clients of NSO Group."
dr tech

How does Apple technology hold up against NSO spyware? | Apple | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The disclosure points to a problem security researchers have been warning about for years: that despite its reputation for building what is seen by millions of customers as a secure product, some believe Apple's closed culture and fear of negative press have harmed its ability to provide security for those targeted by governments and criminals. "Apple's self-assured hubris is just unparalleled," said Patrick Wardle, a former NSA employee and founder of the Mac security developer Objective-See. "They basically believe that their way is the best way. And to be fair … the iPhone has had incredible success. "But you talk to any external security researcher, they're probably not going to have a lot of great things to say about Apple. Whereas if you talk to security researchers in dealing with, say, Microsoft, they've said: 'We're gonna put our ego aside, and ultimately realise that the security researchers are reporting vulnerabilities that at the end of the day are benefiting our users, because we're able to patch them.' I don't think Apple has that same mindset.""
dr tech

Majority of Covid misinformation came from 12 people, report finds | Coronavirus | The ... - 0 views

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    "The vast majority of Covid-19 anti-vaccine misinformation and conspiracy theories originated from just 12 people, a report by the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) cited by the White House this week found."
dr tech

Anthony Bourdain documentary sparks backlash for using AI to fake voice | Anthony Bourd... - 0 views

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    "Despite Neville describing his use of AI technology as a "modern storytelling technique", critics voiced concerns on social media over the unannounced use of a "deepfake" voice to say sentences that Bourdain never spoke. Among those upset with the use of AI was Bourdain's ex-wife Ottavia Bourdain. She disputed Neville's claims that he had received her blessing to use the artificial technology, tweeting: "I certainly was NOT the one who said Tony would have been cool with that.""
dr tech

Facebook says Iran-based hackers used site to target US military personnel | Facebook |... - 0 views

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    "Facebook said on Thursday it had taken down about 200 accounts run by a group of hackers in Iran as part of a cyber-spying operation that targeted mostly US military personnel and people working at defense and aerospace companies. The social media company said the group, dubbed "Tortoiseshell" by security experts, used fake online personas to connect with targets, build trust - sometimes over the course of several months - and drive them to other sites, where they were tricked into clicking malicious links that would infect their devices with spying malware."
dr tech

There's a new tactic for exposing you to radical content online: the 'slow red-pill' | ... - 0 views

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    "This type of extreme racist post was frequently met with pushback from the community. Common responses included; "people should be treated as individuals not as part of a group" and "the Democrats are the ones who want to divide us up by race". Implicit or explicit gestures of antisemitism were strongly protested by evangelical Christians. Red-pill posts would rarely stay up long. In most cases, they were only intended to appear in one's Instagram feed and to vanish shortly after. The account would then resume posting popular content, wait another week and try it again. This process would continue for months, maybe a year. By posting mainstream conservative content most of the time, these extreme-right groups were able to build up an audience numbering in the range of 30,000 to 40,000, which they could then incrementally expose to radical content."
dr tech

What's artificial intelligence best at? Stealing human ideas | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    " A new AI pair programmer that helps you write better code. It helps you quickly discover alternative ways to solve problems, write tests, and explore new APIs without having to tediously tailor a search for answers on the internet. As you type, it adapts to the way you write code - to help you complete your work faster. In other words, Copilot will sit on your computer and do a chunk of your coding work for you. There's a long-running joke in the coding community that a substantial portion of the actual work of programming is searching online for people who've solved the same problems as you, and copying their code into your program. Well, now there's an AI that will do that part for you."
dr tech

Social networks' anti-racism policies belied by users' experience | Race | The Guardian - 0 views

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    ""The abhorrent racist abuse directed at England players last night has absolutely no place on Twitter," the social network said on Monday morning. A Facebook spokesperson said similarly: "No one should have to experience racist abuse anywhere, and we don't want it on Instagram." But the statements bore little relation to the experience of the company's users. On Instagram, where thousands left comments on the pages of Marcus Rashford, Bukayo Saka and Jadon Sancho, supportive users who tried to flag abuse to the platform were surprised by the response."
dr tech

Age verification in three different ways, wherever you need it * Yoti - 0 views

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    "How we verify your users We use a combination of AI technology, liveness anti-spoofing and document authenticity checks so you can be confident in the age of your customers."
dr tech

Can facial analysis technology create a child-safe internet? | Identity cards | The Gua... - 0 views

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    "Take Yoti, for instance: the company provides a range of age verification services, partnering with CitizenCard to offer a digital version of its ID, and working with self-service supermarkets to experiment with automatic age recognition of individuals. John Abbott, Yoti's chief business officer, says the system is already as good as a person at telling someone's age from a video of them, and has been tested against a wide range of demographics - including age, race and gender - to ensure that it's not wildly miscategorising any particular group. The company's most recent report claims that a "Challenge 21" policy (blocking under-18s by asking for strong proof of age from people who look under 21) would catch 98% of 17-year-olds, and 99.15% of 16 year olds, for instance."
dr tech

Trump says he will sue social media giants over 'censorship' | Donald Trump | The Guardian - 0 views

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    ""But this is the lead, and I think it's going to be a very, very important game changer for our country. It will be a pivotal battle in the defense of the first amendment and, in the end, I am confident that we will achieve a historic victory for American freedom and at the same time, freedom of speech." The lawsuit faces tough odds. Under a law known as Section 230, internet companies are generally allowed to moderate their content by removing posts that, for instance, are obscene or violate the services' own standards, so long as they are acting in "good faith"."
dr tech

Welcome to dystopia: getting fired from your job as an Amazon worker by an app | Jessa ... - 0 views

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    "Instead, the robots are here not to replace this lower tier of underpaid and undervalued work. They are here to smugly sit in the middle, monitoring and surveilling us, hiring and firing us. Amazon has recently replaced its middle management and human resources workers with artificial intelligence to determine when a worker has outlived their usefulness and needs to be let go. There is no human to appeal to, no negotiating with a bot. "
dr tech

Cops are playing music during filmed encounters to game YouTube's copyright striking - ... - 0 views

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    "The police are attempting to use YouTube's stringent copyright system to keep people from posting recordings of encounters with law enforcement. In a video posted Thursday by the Anti Police-Terror Project (APTP), a community organization dedicated to defunding the Oakland Police Department, Alameda County Sheriff's deputy David Shelby pulled out his phone and began playing Taylor Swift's "Blank Space" during an encounter. He openly admitted, "it can't be posted to YouTube.""
dr tech

'It just doesn't stop!' Do we need a new law to ban out-of-hours emails? | Work & caree... - 0 views

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    "A study last year of 3.1 million workers in North America, Europe and the Middle East found "significant and durable increases" in both the average number of emails sent internally, and the number of recipients. By measuring the time between the first and last emails sent (or meetings attended) in a 24-hour period, the researchers concluded that, since the pandemic, the average workday had extended by 48.5 minutes."
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