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dr tech

Sharing an article makes us feel more knowledgeable - even if we haven't read it - The ... - 0 views

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    "One of the beautiful things about the internet is the sheer amount of knowledge it contains: if you're interested in any topic, you can find a surfeit of information about it in an instant. But this can also have a downside. Search engines can end perpetuating bias, for example. And research by Adrian Ward from the University of Texas, Austin suggests that we can mistake information we've searched for as our own knowledge. Now, in a new paper in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, Ward and colleagues have found that sharing information online also makes us feel that our knowledge has increased - even if we haven't read it."
dr tech

Artificial intelligence identifies previously unknown features associated with cancer r... - 0 views

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    "Rather than being "taught" medical knowledge, the AI was asked to learn using unsupervised deep neural networks, known as autoencoders, without being given any medical knowledge. The researchers developed a method for translating the features found by the AI-only numbers initially-into high-resolution images that can be understood by humans."
dr tech

Twitter has '50% chance' of major crash during World Cup, says insider | Twitter | The ... - 0 views

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    "Twitter stands a 50% chance of a major outage that could take the site offline during the World Cup, according to a recently departed employee with knowledge of how the company responds to large-scale events. The former employee, who was granted anonymity because of the sensitivity of what was discussed, has knowledge of the workings of Twitter Command Centre, the platform's team of troubleshooters who monitor the site for issues such as traffic spikes and data centre outages."
dr tech

'AI isn't a threat' - Boris Eldagsen, whose fake photo duped the Sony judges, hits back... - 0 views

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    "And he emphatically doesn't see the process of building an AI image as dehumanised, or even one in which the human is sidelined. "I don't see it as a threat to creativity. For me, it really is setting me free. All the boundaries I had in the past - material boundaries, budgets - no longer matter. And for the first time in history, the older generation has an advantage, because AI is a knowledge accelerator. Two thirds of the prompts are only good if you have knowledge and skills, when you know how photography works, when you know art history. This is something that a 20-year-old can't do.""
dr tech

iRobot's RP-Vita Telepresence Robots Start Work At Seven Hospitals | Singularity Hub - 0 views

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    "As smart as they are, doctors can't compete with the volume of knowledge that a robot can retain. In an effort to join the best of both worlds - human experience with robotic data - a number of companies are developing telemedicine robots that not only allow doctors to reach out to patients miles or continents away, but can offer immediate information and advice that draws from volumes of medical research and case studies. In January the FDA approved the telepresence platform RP-Vita, developed by iRobot and InTouch Health. Now seven hospitals across North America have enlisted the services of RP-Vita, bringing us one step closer to robotics-augmented healthcare."
dr tech

Uber knows you're more likely to pay surge prices when your phone is dying - 0 views

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    "Uber knows when your phone battery is running low because its app collects that information in order to switch into power-saving mode. But Chen swears Uber would never use that knowledge to gouge you out of more money. "We absolutely don't use that to kind of like push you a higher surge price, but it's an interesting kind of psychological fact of human behavior," Chen said. Uber's surge pricing uses a proprietary algorithm that accounts for how many users are hailing rides in an area at a given time. Customers are apparently less willing to believe that when the multiplier is a round number like 2.0 or 3.0, which seems more like it could have been arbitrarily made up by a human."
dr tech

Rich and poor teenagers use the web differently - here's what this is doing to inequali... - 0 views

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    ""Equal access does imply equal opportunities," says the report, which goes on to point out that while anyone can use the internet to learn about the world, improve their skills or apply for a well-paid job, disadvantaged students are less likely to be aware of the opportunities that digital technology offers. "They may not have the knowledge or skills required to turn online opportunities into real opportunities," the report says."
dr tech

Robot doctors, online lawyers and automated architects: the future of the professions? ... - 0 views

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    "Advances in technology have long been recognised as a threat to manual labour. Now highly skilled, knowledge-based jobs that were once regarded as safe could be at risk. How will they adapt to the digital age?"
dr tech

'Cybersecurity' begins with integrity, not surveillance | Technology | theguardian.com - 0 views

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    "That is, when you are continuously surveilled, when your every word - even your private conversations, even your personal journals - are subject to continuous monitoring, you never have the space in which to think things through. If you doubt a piece of popular wisdom and want to hash it out, your ability to carry on that discussion is limited the knowledge that your testing of the day's received ideas is on the record forever and may be held against you."
dr tech

Wikipedia's view of the world is written by the west | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The researchers, led by Dr Mark Graham from the university's Oxford Internet Institute, argue that the study shows that "local voices rarely represent and define their own country". Instead, high-income countries have a disproportionately loud voice on the crowd-sourced encyclopedia, so countries that have many Wikipedia editors can "dominate the production of knowledge about smaller countries""
dr tech

8 Skilled Jobs That May Soon Be Replaced by Robots - 0 views

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    "Unskilled manual laborers have felt the pressure of automation for a long time - but, increasingly, they're not alone. The last few years have been a bonanza of advances in artificial intelligence. As our software gets smarter, it can tackle harder problems, which means white-collar and pink-collar workers are at risk as well. Here are eight jobs expected to be automated (partially or entirely) in the coming decades. Call Center Employees call-center Telemarketing used to happen in a crowded call center, with a group of representatives cold-calling hundreds of prospects every day. Of those, maybe a few dozen could be persuaded to buy the product in question. Today, the idea is largely the same, but the methods are far more efficient. Many of today's telemarketers are not human. In some cases, as you've probably experienced, there's nothing but a recording on the other end of the line. It may prompt you to "press '1' for more information," but nothing you say has any impact on the call - and, usually, that's clear to you. But in other cases, you may get a sales call and have no idea that you're actually speaking to a computer. Everything you say gets an appropriate response - the voice may even laugh. How is that possible? Well, in some cases, there is a human being on the other side, and they're just pressing buttons on a keyboard to walk you through a pre-recorded but highly interactive marketing pitch. It's a more practical version of those funny soundboards that used to be all the rage for prank calls. Using soundboard-assisted calling - regardless of what it says about the state of human interaction - has the potential to make individual call center employees far more productive: in some cases, a single worker will run two or even three calls at the same time. In the not too distant future, computers will be able to man the phones by themselves. At the intersection of big data, artificial intelligence, and advanced
dr tech

Riding with the Stars: Passenger Privacy in the NYC Taxicab Dataset - Research - 0 views

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    "The most well-documented of these deals with the hash function used to "anonymize" the license and medallion numbers. A bit of lateral thinking from one civic hacker and the data was completely de-anonymized. This data can now be used to calculate, for example, any driver's annual income. More disquieting, though, in my opinion, is the privacy risk to passengers. With only a small amount of auxiliary knowledge, using this dataset an attacker could identify where an individual went, how much they paid, weekly habits, etc. I will demonstrate how easy this is to do in the following section."
dr tech

Can Google's AlphaGo really feel it in its algorithms? | John Naughton | Opinion | The ... - 0 views

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    "The really significant thing about AlphaGo is that it (and its creators) cannot explain its moves. And yet it plays a very difficult game expertly. So it's displaying a capability eerily similar to what we call intuition - "knowledge obtained without conscious reasoning". Up to now, we have regarded that as an exclusively human prerogative. It's what Newton was on about when he wrote "Hypotheses non fingo" in the second edition of his Principia: "I don't make hypotheses," he's saying, "I just know.""
dr tech

Emergency room doctors used a patient's FitBit to determine how to save his life / Boin... - 0 views

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    "To date, activity trackers have been used medically only to encourage or monitor patient activity, particularly in conjunction with weight loss programs.5, 6 To our knowledge, this is the first report to use the information in an activity tracker-smartphone system to assist in specific medical decisionmaking."
dr tech

To Measure Your Stress Level, Scientists Can Analyze Your Eyes - 0 views

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    How long before this is used without our knowledge in facial recognition systems? "Through the use of the data from this lab study and a formula Kim and Yang applied called "fractal dimension," Kim and Yang discovered a negative relationship between the fractal dimension of pupil dilation and a person's workload, showing that pupil dilation could be used to indicate the mental workload of a person in a multitasking environment."
dr tech

Facial recognition tech is arsenic in the water of democracy, says Liberty | Technology... - 0 views

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    "She said: "I don't think it should ever be used. It is one of, if not the, greatest threats to individual freedom, partly because of the intimacy of the information it takes and hands to the state without your consent, and without even your knowledge, and partly because you don't know what is done with that information.""
dr tech

Computer Scientist Publishes Manifesto for Expressive Algorithmic Music | Motherboard - 0 views

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    "Generally, it questions the advance of computing in the absence of a deeper knowledge of how the human brain perceives the world to be computed. We want computers to have perception, yet we know little about the workings of our own human perception."
dr tech

The Guardian view on machine learning: a computer cleverer than you? | Editorial | Opin... - 0 views

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    "It is in the nature of AI that makers do not, and often cannot, predict what their creations do. We know how to make machines learn. But programmers do not understand completely the knowledge that intelligent computing acquires. If we did, we wouldn't need computers to learn to learn."
dr tech

Medical students take final exams online for first time, despite student concern | Educ... - 0 views

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    ""To the best of our knowledge, this is the first digital 'open book' exam delivered remotely for final-year students," said Dr Amir Sam, Imperial's head of undergraduate medicine. Open-book exams allow students access to any resource material they may need during the exam."
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