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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Adrienne Michetti

Adrienne Michetti

Why Women Still Can't Have It All - www.theatlantic.com - Readability - 7 views

  • Just about all of the women in that room planned to combine careers and family in some way. But almost all assumed and accepted that they would have to make compromises that the men in their lives were far less likely to have to make.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      and this is what bothers me. SO MUCH.
  • when many members of the younger generation have stopped listening, on the grounds that glibly repeating “you can have it all” is simply airbrushing reality, it is time to talk.

  • I still strongly believe that women can “have it all” (and that men can too). I believe that we can “have it all at the same time.” But not today, not with the way America’s economy and society are currently structured. My experiences over the past three years have forced me to confront a number of uncomfortable facts that need to be widely acknowledged—and quickly changed.
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  • I had the ability to set my own schedule most of the time. I could be with my kids when I needed to be, and still get the work done.
  • the minute I found myself in a job that is typical for the vast majority of working women (and men), working long hours on someone else’s schedule, I could no longer be both the parent and the professional I wanted to be
  • having it all, at least for me, depended almost entirely on what type of job I had.
  • having it all was not possible in many types of jobs, including high government office—at least not for very long.
  • “Having control over your schedule is the only way that women who want to have a career and a family can make it work.”
  • Yet the decision to step down from a position of power—to value family over professional advancement, even for a time—is directly at odds with the prevailing social pressures on career professionals in the United States.
  • “leaving to spend time with your family” is a euphemism for being fired.
  • Think about what this “standard Washington excuse” implies: it is so unthinkable that an official would actually step down to spend time with his or her family that this must be a cover for something else.
  • it cannot change unless top women speak out.
  • Both were very clear that they did not want that life, but could not figure out how to combine professional success and satisfaction with a real commitment to family.
  • many of us are also reinforcing a falsehood: that “having it all” is, more than anything, a function of personal determination.
  • there has been very little honest discussion among women of our age about the real barriers and flaws that still exist in the system despite the opportunities we inherited.
  • But we have choices about the type and tempo of the work we do. We are the women who could be leading, and who should be equally represented in the leadership ranks.
  • women are less happy today than their predecessors were in 1972, both in absolute terms and relative to men.
  • The best hope for improving the lot of all women, and for closing what Wolfers and Stevenson call a “new gender gap”—measured by well-being rather than wages—is to close the leadership gap:
  • Only when women wield power in sufficient numbers will we create a society that genuinely works for all women. That will be a society that works for everyone.
  • We must clear them out of the way to make room for a more honest and productive discussion about real solutions to the problems faced by professional women.
  • These women cannot possibly be the standard against which even very talented professional women should measure themselves. Such a standard sets up most women for a sense of failure
  • A simple measure is how many women in top positions have children compared with their male colleagues.
  • Every male Supreme Court justice has a family. Two of the three female justices are single with no children.
  • women hold fewer than 30 percent of the senior foreign-policy positions in each of these institutions.
  • “You know what would help the vast majority of women with work/family balance? MAKE SCHOOL SCHEDULES MATCH WORK SCHEDULES.” The present system, she noted, is based on a society that no longer exists—one in which farming was a major occupation and stay-at-home moms were the norm. Yet the system hasn’t changed.
  • “Inflexible schedules, unrelenting travel, and constant pressure to be in the office are common features of these jobs.”
  • I would hope to see commencement speeches that finger America’s social and business policies, rather than women’s level of ambition, in explaining the dearth of women at the top. But changing these policies requires much more than speeches. It means fighting the mundane battles—every day, every year—in individual workplaces, in legislatures, and in the media.
  • assumes that most women will feel as comfortable as men do about being away from their children, as long as their partner is home with them. In my experience, that is simply not the case.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This is fascinating. Really. 
  • I do not believe fathers love their children any less than mothers do, but men do seem more likely to choose their job at a cost to their family, while women seem more likely to choose their family at a cost to their job.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This. This is SO TRUE. I think this is the same.
  • To many men, however, the choice to spend more time with their children, instead of working long hours on issues that affect many lives, seems selfish.
  • It is not clear to me that this ethical framework makes sense for society. Why should we want leaders who fall short on personal responsibilities?
  • Regardless, it is clear which set of choices society values more today. Workers who put their careers first are typically rewarded; workers who choose their families are overlooked, disbelieved, or accused of unprofessionalism.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This disconnect has ALWAYS bothered me. SO MUCH.
  • having a supportive mate may well be a necessary condition if women are to have it all, but it is not sufficient
  • Ultimately, it is society that must change, coming to value choices to put family ahead of work just as much as those to put work ahead of family. If we really valued those choices, we would value the people who make them; if we valued the people who make them, we would do everything possible to hire and retain them; if we did everything possible to allow them to combine work and family equally over time, then the choices would get a lot easier.
  • Given the way our work culture is oriented today, I recommend establishing yourself in your career first but still trying to have kids before you are 35—or else freeze your eggs, whether you are married or not.
  • But the truth is, neither sequence is optimal, and both involve trade-offs that men do not have to make.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      exactly this -- men do not have to make this choice. Thus, it will always be unequal.
  • You should be able to have a family if you want one—however and whenever your life circumstances allow—and still have the career you desire.
  • If more women could strike this balance, more women would reach leadership positions. And if more women were in leadership positions, they could make it easier for more women to stay in the workforce. The rest of this essay details how.
  • I have to admit that my assumption that I would stay late made me much less efficient over the course of the day than I might have been, and certainly less so than some of my colleagues, who managed to get the same amount of work done and go home at a decent hour.
  • Still, armed with e-mail, instant messaging, phones, and videoconferencing technology, we should be able to move to a culture where the office is a base of operations more than the required locus of work.
  • Being able to work from home—in the evening after children are put to bed, or during their sick days or snow days, and at least some of the time on weekends—can be the key, for mothers, to carrying your full load versus letting a team down at crucial moments.
  • Changes in default office rules should not advantage parents over other workers; indeed, done right, they can improve relations among co-workers by raising their awareness of each other’s circumstances and instilling a sense of fairness.
  • The policy was shaped by the belief that giving women “special treatment” can “backfire if the broader norms shaping the behavior of all employees do not change.”
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This is so progressive.
  • Our assumptions are just that: things we believe that are not necessarily so. Yet what we assume has an enormous impact on our perceptions and responses. Fortunately, changing our assumptions is up to us.
  • One of the best ways to move social norms in this direction is to choose and celebrate different role models.
  • If we didn’t start to learn how to integrate our personal, social, and professional lives, we were about five years away from morphing into the angry woman on the other side of a mahogany desk who questions her staff’s work ethic after standard 12-hour workdays, before heading home to eat moo shoo pork in her lonely apartment.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      UGH.
  • Women have contributed to the fetish of the one-dimensional life, albeit by necessity. The pioneer generation of feminists walled off their personal lives from their professional personas to ensure that they could never be discriminated against for a lack of commitment to their work.
  • It seems odd to me to list degrees, awards, positions, and interests and not include the dimension of my life that is most important to me—and takes an enormous amount of my time.
  • when my entire purpose is to make family references routine and normal in professional life.
  • This does not mean that you should insist that your colleagues spend time cooing over pictures of your baby or listening to the prodigious accomplishments of your kindergartner. It does mean that if you are late coming in one week, because it is your turn to drive the kids to school, that you be honest about what you are doing.
  • Seeking out a more balanced life is not a women’s issue; balance would be better for us all.
  • Indeed, the most frequent reaction I get in putting forth these ideas is that when the choice is whether to hire a man who will work whenever and wherever needed, or a woman who needs more flexibility, choosing the man will add more value to the company.
  • In 2011, a study on flexibility in the workplace by Ellen Galinsky, Kelly Sakai, and Tyler Wigton of the Families and Work Institute showed that increased flexibility correlates positively with job engagement, job satisfaction, employee retention, and employee health.
  • Other scholars have concluded that good family policies attract better talent, which in turn raises productivity, but that the policies themselves have no impact on productivity.
  • What is evident, however, is that many firms that recruit and train well-educated professional women are aware that when a woman leaves because of bad work-family balance, they are losing the money and time they invested in her.
  • The answer—already being deployed in different corners of the industry—is a combination of alternative fee structures, virtual firms, women-owned firms, and the outsourcing of discrete legal jobs to other jurisdictions.
  • Women, and Generation X and Y lawyers more generally, are pushing for these changes on the supply side; clients determined to reduce legal fees and increase flexible service are pulling on the demand side. Slowly, change is happening.
  • In trying to address these issues, some firms are finding out that women’s ways of working may just be better ways of working, for employees and clients alike.
  • “We believe that connecting play and imagination may be the single most important step in unleashing the new culture of learning.”
  • “Genius is nothing more nor less than childhood recovered at will.” Google apparently has taken note.
  • the more often people with different perspectives come together, the more likely creative ideas are to emerge. Giving workers the ability to integrate their non-work lives with their work—whether they spend that time mothering or marathoning—will open the door to a much wider range of influences and ideas.
  • Men have, of course, become much more involved parents over the past couple of decades, and that, too, suggests broad support for big changes in the way we balance work and family.
  • women would do well to frame work-family balance in terms of the broader social and economic issues that affect both women and men.
  • These women are extraordinary role models.
  • Yet I also want a world in which, in Lisa Jackson’s words, “to be a strong woman, you don’t have to give up on the things that define you as a woman.”
  • “Empowering yourself,” Jackson said in her speech at Princeton, “doesn’t have to mean rejecting motherhood, or eliminating the nurturing or feminine aspects of who you are.”
  • But now is the time to revisit the assumption that women must rush to adapt to the “man’s world” that our mothers and mentors warned us about.
  • If women are ever to achieve real equality as leaders, then we have to stop accepting male behavior and male choices as the default and the ideal.
  • We must insist on changing social policies and bending career tracks to accommodate our choices, too. We have the power to do it if we decide to, and we have many men standing beside us.
  • But when we do, we will stop talking about whether women can have it all.
Adrienne Michetti

» 9 Essential Skills Kids Should Learn :zenhabits - 10 views

  • We are teaching them to learn on their own, without us handing knowledge down to them and testing them on that knowledge.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Assumption: that he knows how to unschool.
  • and more importantly, what I have learned about learning and working and living in a world that will never stop changing.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      aspire and agree
  • Asking questions.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      aspire
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  • Work on projects with your kid, letting him see how it’s done by working with you, then letting him do more and more by himself.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      what about the time management, and collaborative projects? 
  • Tolerance
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      argue: this (and others) are not a skill, but a concept.
  • Kids in today’s school system are not being prepared well for tomorrow’s world.
Adrienne Michetti

For Teachers - Gapminder.org - 22 views

  •  
    This is finally data visualization for educators. yay!
Adrienne Michetti

International Program Catches On in U.S. Schools - NYTimes.com - 15 views

  • It seems more real-world than how we used to learn, and it’s changed how we look at the world
  • Many parents, schools and students see the program as a rigorous and more internationally focused curriculum, and a way to impress college admissions officers.
  • they’d had no idea there was a big wide world out there,
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  • Our students don’t have as much diversity as people in some other areas, so this makes them open their eyes,” said Deb Pinkham, the program’s English teacher.
  • the people who founded the I.B. were sitting in Geneva, post-World War II, thinking about how to ensure world peace, so the clear philosophical bent is that by integrating learning and understanding issues from multiple perspectives, we can promote global thinking,
  • “A.P. is great for content-based traditional learning,” he said. “It’s great for kids who like to memorize. But for more creative kids, who want to make those connections, there’s nothing like the I.B.”
  • Emily, who said she was bored with school last year, said the I.B. program had been more interesting and challenging.
  • It’s a new way of thinking, but the kids grew into it.
  • I think it’s good for America for students to learn how others nations think
  • “I.B. taught us how to think through a position, and support it,
Adrienne Michetti

International Engagement Through Education: Remarks by Secretary Arne Duncan at the Cou... - 6 views

  • two important trends that inform our drive to transform education in America. The first is increased international competition. The second is increased international collaboration
  • cultural awareness of all our students
  • education reform
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  • We haven't been compelled to meet our global neighbors on their own terms, and learn about their histories, values and viewpoints. I am worried that in this interconnected world, our country risks being disconnected from the contributions of other countries and cultures. Through education and exchange, we can become better collaborators and competitors in the global economy
  • The President said that "education and innovation will be the currency of the 21st century."
  • In this way, Secretary Clinton said, "We will exercise American leadership to build partnerships and solve problems that no nation can solve on its own." This view of smart power and U.S. leadership applies to the work of improving educational attainment and partnerships around the globe.
  • International collaboration cuts across nearly every office in our agency
  • Such collaboration can inform and strengthen our reform efforts nationally, even as it helps improve standards of teaching and learning—and fosters understanding—internationally.
  • We must improve language learning and international education at all levels if our nation is to continue to lead in the global economy; to help bring security and stability to the world; and to build stronger and more productive ties with our neighbors.
  • we have never been more aware of the value of a multi-literate, multi-lingual society: a society that can appreciate all that makes other cultures and nations distinctive, even as it embraces all that they have in common.
  •  
    Speech given by Arne Duncan, May 17, 2010 regarding international collaboration and engagement in US Education
Adrienne Michetti

Debbie Meier and the Dawn of Central Park East by Seymour Fliegel, City Journal Winter ... - 3 views

  • “I’ve got a problem in the Central Park East School between Debbie Meier and some of her parents,” he said. “Go see what it’s about.”
  • In 1976
  • I went over to Central Park East, which was then a fledgling alternative school just completing its second year, to introduce myself to Debbie Meier, the school’s director
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  • Debbie Meier has since become a nationally known authority on education, the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation “Genius” award, but in June 1976 that wasn’t the case.
  • . What was not yet clear to outsiders was that it had been deliberately designed to thrive on conflict.
  • From the first moment I walked into a public school I was intrigued.
  • . “The principals paid lip service to us and our aspirations,” she remembers, “but the changes didn’t last.” By the end of 1973, just as she was becoming disgusted by her lack of progress working within the established system, she got a call from Bonnie Brownstein, a science coordinator in District Four. Brownstein told Meier that Superintendent Alvarado had heard about her work and wanted her to start a new school in East Harlem. Meier, attuned to the ways of educational bureaucracies, was skeptical at first, but when she met with the new superintendent, he convinced her that he was serious.
  • and she had tried to create “open classroom” programs
  • an educational method which she believed reflected the cognitive development of children, combining John Dewey’s learning theory with more recent psychological investigations of Jean Piaget.
  • Meier and her associates proposed a pedagogy based on “open classrooms” where teachers would provide children with stimulating materials, observe them working and playing with those materials, and, guided by their observations, offer each child assistance to extend his or her skills and interests.
  • Neither the parents in the neighborhood nor the other teachers in District Four understood what the school was trying to accomplish, and they regarded Meier’s efforts with attitudes ranging from indifference to outright hostility.
  • Local educational conservatives, on the other hand, were equally mistrustful of what they saw as the school’s permissiveness.
  • There would be one rule: Children would come to Central Park East because their parents chose that school for them
  • parents were required to visit with their children in order to gain admission. Beyond that, Meier set forth no policies and promised no particular results.
Adrienne Michetti

Force field analysis - 5 views

  • Force field analysis is a management technique developed by Kurt Lewin, a pioneer in the field of social sciences, for diagnosing situations. It will be useful when looking at the variables involved in planning and implementing a change program and will undoubtedly be of use in team building projects,when attempting to overcome resistance to change.
  • driving
  • restraining
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  • initiate a change and keep it goin
  • acting to restrain or decrease the driving force
  • Equilibrium is reached when the sum of the driving forces equals the sum of the restraining forces
  • present level of productivity
  • This equilibrium, or present level of productivity, can be raised or lowered by changes in the relationship between the driving and the restraining forces.
  • Managers are often in a position in which they must consider not only output but also intervening variables and not only short-term but also long-term goals. It can be seen that force field analysis provides framework that is useful in diagnosing these interrelationships.
  •  
    Force field analysis is a management technique developed by Kurt Lewin, a pioneer in the field of social sciences, for diagnosing situations. It will be useful when looking at the variables involved in planning and implementing a change program and will undoubtedly be of use in team building projects,when attempting to overcome resistance to change.
Adrienne Michetti

Bloom's Taxonomy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 6 views

  • A great mythology has grown around the taxonomy, possibly due to many people learning about the taxonomy through second hand information.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      interesting! why haven't people actually read it, then? Is it kind of like H. Gardner's Multiple Intelligences in that people just jumped on board without actually reading the fine print?
  • It is considered to be a foundational and essential element within the education community as evidenced in the 1981 survey Significant writings that have influenced the curriculum: 1906-1981,
  • the original Handbook was intended only to focus on one of the three domains
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  • the initial effort to be a starting point,
  • divides educational objectives into three "domains:" Affective, Psychomotor, and Cognitive.
  • A goal of Bloom's Taxonomy is to motivate educators to focus on all three domains, creating a more holistic form of education
  • Traditional education tends to emphasize the skills in this domain, particularly the lower-order objectives.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      and too often we only use the hierarchy in this domain, ignoring psychomotor and affective.
  • Affective objectives typically target the awareness and growth in attitudes, emotion, and feelings.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      perhaps more important for overall well-being than the other two domains.
  • the ability to physically manipulate a tool or instrument like a hand or a hamme
  • Bloom and his colleagues never created subcategories for skills in the psychomotor domain
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      interesting - I wonder why.
Adrienne Michetti

ICT in Education Assessments are Biased and Inaccurate « Educational Technolo... - 7 views

  • One of the conclusions was that indeed, large reforms (e.g., “Het nieuwe leren”, or the new learning) were imposed without scientific support. Another that political prejudices, not any kind of data, were the main motivating factor in the reforms.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Sadly, I think this is true of most educational reforms - ICT or not.
  • The alternative, assessing educational reforms well before introduction, is a form of social engineering. Social engineering seems to always be more difficult than you think. And I think history has shown that education is no exception in this respect.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      an interesting argument, though I am not sure I agree.
  • Scientific “facts” are never appreciated unless they completely align with the preconceptions of the “stake-holders” (minus the children).
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      what kind of "scientific facts" would guide ICT reform, though? what about research? studies? user testing?
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  • : Does this ICT4E solution improve scores on existing tests
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      whose tests? and what is being tested? and why do tests have to be the only metric of success?
  • The curriculum is obsessed with jargon and nomenclature, seemingly for no other purpose than to provide teachers with something to test the students on.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      I would probably argue that having tests which match the curriculum is a GOOD thing. However, in this case it seems that the problem is the curriculum. So reform does not always begin with the assessment, or with the ICT.
  • If we want to test whether changes in education really improve learning, we do have other tools. They are called aptitude tests.
Adrienne Michetti

Theory and Practice of Online Learning - 12 views

  •  
    Chapter 6: Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology by Patrick J. Fahy, Athabasca University
Adrienne Michetti

Digital Web Magazine - The Principles of Design - 11 views

  • concepts that can that make any project stronger without interfering in the more technical considerations later on
  • one of many disciplines within the larger field of design
  • a discipline within the field of art
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  • the basic tenets of design into two categories: principles and elements
  • the principles of design are the overarching truths of the profession
  • the elements of design are the components of design themselves, the objects to be arranged.
  • principles
    • Balance
    • Rhythm
    • Proportion
    • Dominance
    • Unity
  • Balance is an equilibrium
  • visual weight within a composition
  • Symmetrical balance
  • When symmetry occurs with similar, but not identical, forms it is called approximate symmetry
  • Symmetrical balance is also known as formal balance.
  • ntral axis.
  • Asymmetrical balance
  • tend to have a greater sense of visual tension. Asymmetrical balance is also known as informal balance.
  • Rhythm is the repetition or alternation of elements
  • Regular
  • Flowing
  • Progressive
  • three stages of dominance
  • Proportion is the comparison of dimensions or distribution of forms.
  • Dominance relates to varying degrees of emphasis in design
  • visual weight
  • relationship in scale between one element and another,
  • Dominant
  • Sub-dominant
  • Subordinate
  • unity describes the relationship between the individual parts and the whole of a composition
  • Gestalt theories of visual perception and psychology, specifically those dealing with how the human brain organizes visual information into categories, or groups
  • Closure is the idea that the brain tends to fill in missing information when it perceives an object is missing some of its pieces.
  • Continuance is the idea that once you begin looking in one direction, you will continue to do so until something more significant catches your attention
  • Items of similar size, shape and color tend to be grouped together by the brain, and a semantic relationship between the items is formed.
  • In addition, items in close proximity to or aligned with one another tend to be grouped in a similar way.
  • Contrast addresses the notion of dynamic tensionÔthe degree of conflict that exists within a given design between the visual elements in the composition.
  • The objects in the environment represent the positive space, and the environment itself is the negative space.
  • The rule of thirds is a compositional tool that makes use of the notion that the most interesting compositions are those in which the primary element is off center.
  • The visual center of any page is just slightly above and to the right of the actual (mathematical) center.
  • sometimes referred to as museum height.
  • The principles of design are the guiding truths of our profession, the basic concepts of balance, rhythm, proportion, dominance and unity. Successful use of these core ideas insures a solid foundation upon which any design can thrive.
  •  
    These principles of design can be applied to almost anything, I believe.
Adrienne Michetti

Universal Design in Education: Principles and Applications - 11 views

  • to make all aspects of the educational experience more inclusive
  • philosophical framework
  • include
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      I love that this is not just being restricted to technology, but is including spaces and texts.
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  • Equitable use
  • Ronald Mace,
  • the design of products and environments to be usable to the greatest extent possible by people of all ages and abilities"
  • diversity and inclusiveness
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This is very reminiscent of MYP.
  • seven principles for the universal design of products and environments
  • a design foundation for more accessible and usable products and environments
  • Flexibility in use
  • applications in educational settings: physical spaces, information technology (IT), instruction, and student services.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      ALL educators should be participating in UD.
  • Perceptible information
  • Tolerance for error
  • Low physical effort
  • Size and space for approach and use.
  • benefits all students
  • Simple and intuitive use
  • UD can be applied to physical spaces to ensure that they are welcoming, comfortable, accessible, attractive, and functional.
  • Output and Displays.
  • Input and Controls.
  • Manipulations.
  • Documentation.
  • Safety.
  • it is possible to create products that are simultaneously accessible to people with a wide range of abilities, disabilities, and other characteristics.
  • institutions can express the desire to purchase accessible IT and inquire about the accessibility features of specific products.
  • UDL as "a research-based set of principles that together form a practical framework for using technology to maximize learning opportunities for every student"
  • curriculum designers create products to meet the needs of students with a wide range of abilities, learning styles, and preferences.
  • Multiple means of representation
  • Multiple means of action and expression
  • Multiple means of engagement
  • the following first steps for curriculum developers and teachers:

    Unfortunately, most educational software programs available today do not apply these recommendations. Instead of including flexible features that provide access to students with disabilities, they continue to unintentionally erect barriers to the curriculum.

  • Universal design can be applied to all aspects of instruction—teaching techniques, curricula, assessment
  • Class Climate.
  • Interaction.
  • Physical Environments and Products.
  • Delivery Methods.
  • Information Resources and Technology.
  • Feedback
  • Assessment.
  • Accommodation.
  • When universal design is applied, everyone feels welcome,
Adrienne Michetti

AJET 19(1) Boyle (2003) - design principles for authoring dynamic, reusable learning ob... - 1 views

  • delineate a coherent framework for the authoring of re-purposable learning objects
  • significant changes in the creation of learning objects
  • nternational work directed at developing learning object standards
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  • a learning object is defined as any entity, digital or non-digital, that may be used for learning, education or training. IEEE
  • ork on metadata and learning object packaging
  • cohesion
  • ke any learning object and provide a 'wrapper' around this object
  • learning object is thus 'packaged' in a standard container format
  • learning objects must be developed with potential reuse, and especially repurposing in mind. The principal aim of this paper is to explore and delineate principles underlying authoring for reuse and repurposing.

  • taxonomy
  • This mapping suggests that each learning object should be based on one learning objective or clear learning goal.
  • The principle of cohesion, however, indicates that there should be a separate learning object for each type of loop. An immediate advantage is that the tutor can select the order in which these learning objects are combined. A tutor dealing with experienced student may wish to deal with these in sequence; another tutor with a different group of students may intersperse these learning objects with object dealing with other features of the language.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This would, then, make them easier to edit and manipulate in the future. I can follow this article.
  • the principle of 'de-coupling', or more accurately minimised coupling.
  • unit (software module/learning object) should have minimal bindings to other units.
  • independently of the other (
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Right - and the goal is complete independence so as to be able to manipulate and change later.
  • The learning object should, as far as possible, be free standing.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      YES! Can we please apply this to items as simple as Word documents and HTML? It would make things so much easier. This also reminds me of good pedagogical design principles BEFORE we had digital learning -- the same should be true for worksheets, handouts, textbooks, etc. It needs to be able to be changed.
  • adaptation
  • The challenge is to maintain this richness in a system composed of reusable components.
  • We must face the challenge of creating learning objects that are cohesive, decoupled and pedagogically rich. This design challenge is associated with the issue of 'repurposability' as we might expect rich learning objects to provide further options for adaptation by local tutors.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Yes, yes, and yes. We need to think beyond our own immediate purposes.
  • n the Java language
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      quite honestly, I would have preferred a non-computer programming example. These principles apply to all technology design, not just programming. Something more accessible would have made this paper stronger.
  • The project involves intervention in syllabus development, the social organisation of learning and the introduction of new eLearning materials. The eLearning resources are being based on the authoring of rich, reusable learning objects. This development provides the focus for the present discussion.
  • The learning objects are being developed both to meet immediate pedagogical needs and to serve this larger goal. This produces extra pressure initially. However, it provides the potential to divide the eventual task among a number of contributing partners, exploiting considerable advantages of scale.
  • A key challenge for the project is to resolve the tensions in a creative and productive way.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Basically, you have to take it all apart and put it back together again. This is fundamental to learning a new way to design anything, really.
  • A compound object consists of two or more independent learning objects that are linked to create the compound.
  • A further important feature is that each simple component object can be reused independently.
  • They thus provide a basis for pedagogical richness that fully exploits the opportunities offered by the technology.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      YES! use the tech to its best.
  • they should be able to reconfigure this to shape their own compound object.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This is so crucial. Each educator must be able to restructure it, use to his/her advantage within context.
  • manage the bindings between one object and others
  • main types of binding: navigational bindings through URLs and non-URL based content bindings. This design pattern deals with the issue of URL based bindings.
  • we must have a design mechanism for managing these bindings.
  • learning object consists of a core and zero or more expansions. A default object is presented with the core with certain expansions added. These expansions aim to provide added pedagogical value to help in attaining the learning objective.
  • the relationship between learning objects and the syllabus, course or other higher organising structure in which they are delivered.
  • the syllabus navigation structure operates at a different layer of organisation for the learning object resources
  • . These syllabi objects operate at a different layer from that of main content objects
  • The key message is the need to establish distinct layers of organisation in eLearning
  • The central challenge is to design for reuse and repurposing.
  •  
    painful reading with the example of Java - but the point remains that all learning objects should be managed and designed with the purpose of being able to use them in the future in ways that are dynamic and reusable. This means de-coupling them and ensuring they are made of distinct pedagogical units.
Adrienne Michetti

OLPC Human Interface Guidelines/Design Fundamentals/Key Design Principles - OLPC - 0 views

  • n which provides a low floor to the inexperienced, but doesn't impose a ceiling upon those who are.
  • tailored to the needs of children in the context of their learning
  • n activity ring that contains icons representing each instance of an open activity
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • limitations
  • mphasis on discoverability and usability
  • the actual behavior of the activities, the layout of the buttons and tools, and the feedback that the interface provides to the children when they interact with it
  • there is no substitute for user testing
  • imple doesn't necessarily mean limited
  • simple—even minimal—controls can have great expressive power.
  • a "fail-soft" approach to their designs
  • five categories of "bad things" software can do:

    1. damaging the laptop;
    2. compromising privacy;
    3. damaging the children's data;
    4. doing bad things to other people; and
      • impersonating the child.
  • without the use of menus, pop-up boxes, passwords, etc., as these approaches are meaningless to most people.
  • no noticeable side-effects
  • When children know they have a fallback plan—a way back to the current state of things—they will much more frequently go beyond their comfortable boundaries and experiment with new tools and new creative means of expression
  • the ability to undo one's actions.
  • Interoperability
  • Towards this end, a view source key has been added to the laptop keyboards, providing them with instant access to the code that enables the activities that they use from day to day. This key will allow those interested to peel away layers of abstraction, digging deeper into the codebase as they learn.
  • (without a mouse or trackpad)
Adrienne Michetti

Comparing ICT use in education across countries | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Educa... - 7 views

  • we still do not have reliable, globally comparable data in this area
  • basic answers to many basic questions about the use of technology in schools around the world remain largely unanswered
  • Recent World Bank technical assistance related to ICT use in education has highlighted the fact that internationally comparable data related to ICT use in education do not exist -- and that this absence is a problem
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • "It is a mistake to separate out technology infrastructure from pedagogical practices."
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Yes, this is true, but very difficult to measure
  • will begun to be collected in late 2010 as part of the general statistical gathering that UIS coordinates with all countries in the world.
  • At first glance, it might appear to some that, generally speaking, the more hours of recommended hours per use of computers might correlate well with how 'advanced' a country is in its use of ICTs in schools.  In fact, the opposite is often the case. 
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      another reason why pedagogy can not be separated from the IT use. It's not enough to simply put a computer in front of a child.
  • In countries considered 'advanced' in ICT use, especially in 1-to-1 computing environments (like Uruguay, for example), laptops are (essentially) always available, but use is not officially prescribed/recommended for a specific period of time.
  • that less developed countries where ICT use in relatively new may well report that ICT use is recommended more than in more 'advanced' countries where ICTs are more mainstreamed in education.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      American educators, are you reading this???
  • it highlights the fact that that simple conclusions drawn from such data can be quite dangerous. 
  • That said, the building of a universal  index related to ICT use in education is especially problemmatic, given the the number of assumptions and value judgements that would need to be made about the importance or weight of individual indicators -- and that cross-national data collection in this area is still in its infancy
  • the fast changing nature of technology requires regular adaptation and change.
  • As we do so, the fact that the UIS will be collecting basic data on where things stand today in all countries in the world will greatly contribute to our collective ability to track developments and changes in this increasingly vital and strategic area of investment for governments and societies around the world. 
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      I'm thinking the data collectors should talk to Hans Rosling.. I bet he has some ideas about how to go about this properly!
  •  
    Fascinating article about upcoming data to be collected on international ICT use in education. So many challenges.
Adrienne Michetti

Gapminder: Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view. - Gapminder.org - 11 views

  •  
    Fascinating way to dispel myths and stereotypes of all kinds: look at the data. It doesn't lie. It's much easier to see the way Hans Rosling presents it at Gapminder.org
Adrienne Michetti

Amazon.com: Storied City: A Children's Book Walking-Tour Guide to New York City (978052... - 1 views

  •  
    A book that is self-guided walking tours in NYC based on children's literature.
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