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Adrienne Michetti

Digital Web Magazine - The Principles of Design - 11 views

  • concepts that can that make any project stronger without interfering in the more technical considerations later on
  • one of many disciplines within the larger field of design
  • a discipline within the field of art
  • ...37 more annotations...
  • the basic tenets of design into two categories: principles and elements
  • the principles of design are the overarching truths of the profession
  • the elements of design are the components of design themselves, the objects to be arranged.
  • principles
  • Balance Rhythm Proportion Dominance Unity
  • Balance is an equilibrium
  • visual weight within a composition
  • Symmetrical balance
  • When symmetry occurs with similar, but not identical, forms it is called approximate symmetry
  • Symmetrical balance is also known as formal balance.
  • ntral axis.
  • Asymmetrical balance
  • tend to have a greater sense of visual tension. Asymmetrical balance is also known as informal balance.
  • Rhythm is the repetition or alternation of elements
  • Regular
  • Flowing
  • Progressive
  • three stages of dominance
  • Proportion is the comparison of dimensions or distribution of forms.
  • Dominance relates to varying degrees of emphasis in design
  • visual weight
  • relationship in scale between one element and another,
  • Dominant
  • Sub-dominant
  • Subordinate
  • unity describes the relationship between the individual parts and the whole of a composition
  • Gestalt theories of visual perception and psychology, specifically those dealing with how the human brain organizes visual information into categories, or groups
  • Closure is the idea that the brain tends to fill in missing information when it perceives an object is missing some of its pieces.
  • Continuance is the idea that once you begin looking in one direction, you will continue to do so until something more significant catches your attention
  • Items of similar size, shape and color tend to be grouped together by the brain, and a semantic relationship between the items is formed.
  • In addition, items in close proximity to or aligned with one another tend to be grouped in a similar way.
  • Contrast addresses the notion of dynamic tensionĂ”the degree of conflict that exists within a given design between the visual elements in the composition.
  • The objects in the environment represent the positive space, and the environment itself is the negative space.
  • The rule of thirds is a compositional tool that makes use of the notion that the most interesting compositions are those in which the primary element is off center.
  • The visual center of any page is just slightly above and to the right of the actual (mathematical) center.
  • sometimes referred to as museum height.
  • The principles of design are the guiding truths of our profession, the basic concepts of balance, rhythm, proportion, dominance and unity. Successful use of these core ideas insures a solid foundation upon which any design can thrive.
  •  
    These principles of design can be applied to almost anything, I believe.
Adrienne Michetti

Universal Design in Education: Principles and Applications - 11 views

  • to make all aspects of the educational experience more inclusive
  • philosophical framework
  • include
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      I love that this is not just being restricted to technology, but is including spaces and texts.
  • ...39 more annotations...
  • Equitable use
  • Ronald Mace,
  • the design of products and environments to be usable to the greatest extent possible by people of all ages and abilities"
  • diversity and inclusiveness
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      This is very reminiscent of MYP.
  • seven principles for the universal design of products and environments
  • a design foundation for more accessible and usable products and environments
  • Flexibility in use
  • applications in educational settings: physical spaces, information technology (IT), instruction, and student services.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      ALL educators should be participating in UD.
  • Perceptible information
  • Tolerance for error
  • Low physical effort
  • Size and space for approach and use.
  • benefits all students
  • Simple and intuitive use
  • UD can be applied to physical spaces to ensure that they are welcoming, comfortable, accessible, attractive, and functional.
  • Output and Displays.
  • Input and Controls.
  • Manipulations.
  • Documentation.
  • Safety.
  • it is possible to create products that are simultaneously accessible to people with a wide range of abilities, disabilities, and other characteristics.
  • institutions can express the desire to purchase accessible IT and inquire about the accessibility features of specific products.
  • UDL as "a research-based set of principles that together form a practical framework for using technology to maximize learning opportunities for every student"
  • curriculum designers create products to meet the needs of students with a wide range of abilities, learning styles, and preferences.
  • Multiple means of representation
  • Multiple means of action and expression
  • Multiple means of engagement
  • the following first steps for curriculum developers and teachers:
  • Unfortunately, most educational software programs available today do not apply these recommendations. Instead of including flexible features that provide access to students with disabilities, they continue to unintentionally erect barriers to the curriculum.
  • Universal design can be applied to all aspects of instruction—teaching techniques, curricula, assessment
  • Class Climate.
  • Interaction.
  • Physical Environments and Products.
  • Delivery Methods.
  • Information Resources and Technology.
  • Feedback
  • Assessment.
  • Accommodation.
  • When universal design is applied, everyone feels welcome,
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