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Ed Webb

The Progressive Stack and Standing for Inclusive Teaching - The Tattooed Professor - 2 views

  • There are two fundamental truths about Inclusive Pedagogy: it is an eminently desirable set of practices for teaching in higher ed, and it is an eminently difficult set of practices for teaching in higher ed
  • Put simply, the Progressive Stack is a method of ensuring that voices that are often submerged, discounted, or excluded from traditional classroom discussions get a chance to be heard
  • There are personal, cultural, learning, and social reasons people don’t speak up in class.  Students of color and women of all races, introverts, the non-conventional thinkers, those from poor previous educational backgrounds, returning or “nontraditional students,” and those from cultures where speaking out is considered rude not participatory are all likely to be silent in a class where collaboration by difference is not structured as a principle of pedagogy and organization and design.   Who loses?  Everyone.  Arguments that are smart and valuable and can change a whole conversation get lost in silence and, sometimes, shame.  When that happens, we don’t really have discussion or collaboration.  We have group think–and that is why we all lose.
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  • Taking “stack” just means keeping a list of people who wish to participate—offer a question or comment—during the Q & A. Rather than anxiously waving your hand around and wondering if you’ll be called on, if you would like to participate, signal to me in some way (a gesture, a dance move, a traditional hand-in-the-air, meaningful eye contact, etc.) and I will add you to the list. However, we’re not just going to take stack, we are going to take progressive stack in an effort to foreground voices that are typically silenced in dominant culture. According to Justine and Zoë, two self-identified transwomen who were active in the movement, progressive stack means that “if you self-identify as trans, queer, a person of color, female, or as a member of any marginalized group you’re given priority on the list of people who want to speak – the stack. The most oppressed get to speak first.” As I take stack, I will also do my best to bump marginalized voices and those who haven’t yet had a chance to participate to the top.
  • As with any tool that confronts the effects of privilege and power head-on, the Progressive Stack makes some people uncomfortable
  • In a complete social and historical vacuum, level-playing-field equality is an excellent proposition. But in the actual lived world of our history, experiences, and interactions the idea of treating everyone uniformly “regardless of gender” or without “seeing color” simply strengthens already-entrenched inequalities
  • As the increasing number of targeted online harassment campaigns has shown us, once a concept or issue has traveled through the right-wing Outrage-Distortion Complex, there is little hope of reclaiming rational discussion. It’s been permanently stained. One might dismiss the frothing lamentations of white-genocide-via-classroom-pedagogy that bubble up from a subreddit, but the insidious trope of “reverse racism” has put its thumb on the scale enough to have distorted the conversation around the Progressive Stack
  • because the Progressive Stack calls attention to existing structures of inequality by replacing them with another structure entirely, it forces those of us who identify as white (and, particularly, male) to confront the ways in which we have been complicit in maintaining inequality
  • When you’re accustomed to privilege, even the suggestion of equality will feel like oppression
  • google “progressive stack.” Almost every result you get will take you to the fever swamps of right-wing Reddit and warmed-over piles of gamergate droppings. The common denominator is that “Progressive Stack” is simply anti-white “racism” dressed in fancy intellectual clothes
  • Giving up power, it turns out, is hard for some people. Especially when that power has been historically-constructed to be so pervasive as to render it unquestioned and indeed unseen in its hegemonic sway. Pierre Bourdieu calls this symbolic power: “For symbolic power is that invisible power which can be exercised only with the complicity of those who do not want to know that they are subject to it or even that they themselves exercise it”
  • It means there will be times when people who are not accustomed to their identity being a source of discomfort and exclusion will have to learn–in a managed and intentional space–what that feels like.
  • there will be friction and messiness and uncomfortable adjustments, because any education worth the name involves friction and messiness and uncomfortable adjustments
Martin Burrett

Implementing Thinking Hats Effectively In The Classroom by @JMcKay1972 - 1 views

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    "With an increased awareness of the need to develop a more flexible approach in delivering 'value' to learning experiences and providing teaching staff with opportunities for greater creativity in the teaching process, then Edward De Bono's Six Thinking Hats (1994) may be a tool to help increase academic achievement and behaviours."
Martin Burrett

Critical Pedagogy - 0 views

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    "In 1970 Paulo Freire published Pedagogy of the Oppressed in response to the antiquated notion of education as filling empty vessels, where an oracular educator lectures ignorant learners, arguing instead for a change in the power balance in the classroom so instead of authoritarian teachers choosing the path of learning, a collaboration of teacher-students and student-teachers would form to make learning bespoke through critical dialogue and critical assessment of the knowledge is being, and in the process, change the world around them."
Martin Burrett

10 Techniques every teacher needs to know by @RichardJARogers - 2 views

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    "I've found that there are many simple techniques that I need to adopt on a daily basis to be exceptional at my job. I'm not talking about that seminar you went to where you had to spend hours planning the so-called 'perfect lesson'. I'm talking about real stuff: things we can actually do that make a difference, and don't eat into our free time."
Ed Webb

Calling Bull. - 8 views

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    Sounds Interesting! What is the course? Syllabus? Links?
Martin Burrett

UKEdMag: Schools, be patient by @HDHSenglish - 0 views

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    "A lot of schools have jumped on buzz words such as metacognition, mindfulness, mindset etc. There is obviously great merit in all these strategies, however as Carol Dweck has emphasised, in a lot of cases these methods are not always understood by school leaders leading to them not being integrated effectively and sustained. These theories are not fads but in many schools, they don't give these methods the planning, time and evaluation that is required for success of any strategies that will benefit learning. Schools are looking for a quick fix and so latch on to 'new, exciting and popular theories'."
Martin Burrett

What Should Schools Teach? 10 suggestions by @RichardJARogers - 3 views

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    "I'm one of those few people who can actually say that I use the stuff I was taught in school on daily basis in my job. I'm a Science Teacher: so naturally, I'm teaching my students almost the same things I was taught at school. However, there are a lot of things I had to work out by myself when I left school. Was 'personal experience' the best way to learn these things?"
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    Martin, given only about 25% will ever need as much academics learning as a science teacher, I say teach the kids to read, do a little arithmetic, a let them study what they want which will probably what they are good at, their special intelligence.
Martin Burrett

25 Pedagogy Ideas that Teachers found on Twitter - 4 views

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    "In our survey, we asked teachers to tell us about resources that they found on twitter which they then implemented in the classroom. Here are 25 of the most commonly shared ideas"
C CC

12 New Year Resolutions for Teachers - UKEdChat.com - 6 views

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    And there goes another year. Where does the time go? New Years bring new hope, new beginnings, new intentions, but when you are a teacher, you quickly realise that the same stuff happens over and over again, with the same daily challenges presenting…
Martin Burrett

To boldly go in a different direction - 5 views

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    Article based in a science class discussing the value of seizing opportunities
Martin Burrett

UKEd Magazine - September 2015 - 4 views

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    Open access educational magazine
C CC

The White Room by @te4chl3arn - 1 views

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    Just you, your class and your brain power
Dean Mantz

http://eductechalogy.org/swfapp/blooms/wheel/engage.swf - 14 views

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    nteractive Blooms Taxonomy
C CC

UKEdMag: June 2014 Issue 06 - 3 views

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    A great free online read
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