Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by Richard Bradshaw

Contents contributed and discussions participated by Richard Bradshaw

Richard Bradshaw

DigitalBookIndex: THE 1930s: Federal Writers' Project (20TH c U.S. HISTORY) (e-Book, eT... - 13 views

  •  
    WPA Writer's Project: Guides to the States
Richard Bradshaw

Considerations Before Deploying iPads and iPods « Socratech Seminars - 142 views

  •  
    ipad deployment considerations
Richard Bradshaw

Liberty Equality and Democracy - 28 views

  •  
    This essay interested me, because it attempts to synthesize the relationship between spirituality and politics.
Richard Bradshaw

Photo Books, Photo Cards, Scrapbooks, Yearbooks and Calendars | Mixbook - 46 views

  •  
    I just started using this for student projects. They love it. It's intuitive, creative, and user friendly.
Richard Bradshaw

The Progressive Movement and the Transformation of American Politics | The Heritage Fou... - 33 views

  • Government had to be limited both because it was dangerous if it got too powerful and because it was not supposed to provide for the highest things in life.
  • In Progressivism, the domestic policy of government had two main concerns.

    First, government must protect the poor and other victims of capitalism through redistribution of resources, anti-trust laws, government control over the details of commerce and production: i.e., dictating at what prices things must be sold, methods of manufacture, government participation in the banking system, and so on.

    Second, government must become involved in the "spiritual" development of its citizens -- not, of course, through promotion of religion, but through protecting the environment ("conservation"), education (understood as education to personal creativity), and spiritual uplift through subsidy and promotion of the arts and culture.

  • Progressives therefore embraced a much more active and indeed imperialistic foreign policy than the Founders did.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • The trend to turn power over to multinational organizations also begins in this period, as may be seen in Wilson's plan for a League of Nations, under whose rules America would have delegated control over the deployment of its own armed forces to that body.
  • The Progressives wanted to sweep away what they regarded as this amateurism in politics. They had confidence that modern science had superseded the perspective of the liberally educated statesman. Only those educated in the top universities, preferably in the social sciences, were thought to be capable of governing.
  • Government, it was thought, needed to be led by those who see where history is going, who understand the ever-evolving idea of human dignity.
  • Politics in the sense of favoritism and self-interest would disappear and be replaced by the universal rule of enlightened bureaucracy.
  • Today's liberals, or the teachers of today's liberals, learned to reject the principles of the founding from their teachers, the Progressives.
  • That is the disparagement of nature and the celebration of human will, the idea that everything of value in life is created by man's choice, not by nature or necessity.
  • Liberal domestic policy follows the same principle. It tends to elevate the "other" to moral superiority over against those whom the Founders would have called the decent and the honorable, the men of wisdom and virtue. The more a person is lacking, the greater is his or her moral claim on society. The deaf, the blind, the disabled, the stupid, the improvident, the ignorant, and even (in a 1984 speech of presidential candidate Walter Mondale) the sad -- those who are lowest are extolled as the sacred other.
  • The first great battle for the American soul was settled in the Civil War. The second battle for America's soul, initiated over a century ago, is still raging. The choice for the Founders' constitutionalism or the Progressive-liberal administrative state is yet to be fully resolved.
  • The Progressive system managed to gain a foothold in American politics only when it made major compromises with the Founders' constitutionalism.
  • Sober liberal friends of the Great Society would later admit that a central reason for its failure was precisely the fact that it was an expertise-driven engineering project, which had never sought the support or even the acquiescence of popular majorities.
  •  
    Well, the truth is I did not intend to share this bookmark with Diigo Education, but somehow it was posted in the group. I had intended it only for myself as part of research I am doing.
1 - 7 of 7
Showing 20 items per page