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Deborah Baillesderr

presentation Archives - Children's Health Council Resource Library - 13 views

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    Great videos and presentations
Louise Lewis

What 21st Century Skills? - CloudEd - 78 views

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    Getting into the mindset to foster 21st century skills in learners.
Louise Lewis

The Internet's Dark Ages - The Atlantic - 51 views

  • It’s not a place in any reliable sense of the word. It is not a repository. It is not a library. It is a constantly changing patchwork of perpetual nowness.
  • It’s unstable.
  • “Except when it goes, it really goes,” said Jason Scott, an archivist and historian for the Internet Archive. “It’s gone gone. A piece of paper can burn and you can still kind of get something from it. With a hard drive or a URL, when it’s gone, there is just zero recourse.”
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  • The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine has a trove of cached web pages going back to 1996.
  • It is not just access to knowledge, but the knowledge itself that’s at stake.
  • Ephemerality is built into the very architecture of the web, which was intended to be a messaging system, not a library.
  • And yet there are no robust mechanisms for libraries and museums to acquire, and thus preserve, digital collections.
  • Vaughan was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in
  • The Internet is now considered a great oracle, a place where information lives and knowledge is stitched together.
Kent Gerber

What the Web Said Yesterday - The New Yorker - 42 views

  • average life of a Web page is about a hundred days
    • Kent Gerber
       
      Where does this statistic come from?
  • Twitter is a rare case: it has arranged to archive all of its tweets at the Library of Congress.
  • Sometimes when you try to visit a Web page what you see is an error message: “Page Not Found.” This is known as “link rot,”
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  • Or maybe the page has been moved and something else is where it used to be. This is known as “content drift,”
  • For the law and for the courts, link rot and content drift, which are collectively known as “reference rot,” have been disastrous.
  • According to a 2014 study conducted at Harvard Law School, “more than 70% of the URLs within the Harvard Law Review and other journals, and 50% of the URLs within United States Supreme Court opinions, do not link to the originally cited information.”
  • one in five links provided in the notes suffers from reference rot
  • 1961, in Cambridge, J. C. R. Licklider, a scientist at the technology firm Bolt, Beranek and Newman, began a two-year study on the future of the library, funded by the Ford Foundation and aided by a team of researchers that included Marvin Minsky, at M.I.T.
  • Licklider envisioned a library in which computers would replace books and form a “network in which every element of the fund of knowledge is connected to every other element.”
  • Licklider’s two-hundred-page Ford Foundation report, “Libraries of the Future,” was published in 1965.
  • Kahle enrolled at M.I.T. in 1978. He studied computer science and engineering with Minsky.
  • Vint Cerf, who worked on ARPAnet in the seventies, and now holds the title of Chief Internet Evangelist at Google, has started talking about what he sees as a need for “digital vellum”: long-term storage. “I worry that the twenty-first century will become an informational black hole,” Cerf e-mailed me. But Kahle has been worried about this problem all along.
  • The Internet Archive is also stocked with Web pages that are chosen by librarians, specialists like Anatol Shmelev, collecting in subject areas, through a service called Archive It, at archive-it.org, which also allows individuals and institutions to build their own archives.
  • Illien told me that, when faced with Kahle’s proposal, “national libraries decided they could not rely on a third party,” even a nonprofit, “for such a fundamental heritage and preservation mission.”
  • screenshots from Web archives have held up in court, repeatedly.
  • Perma.cc has already been adopted by law reviews and state courts; it’s only a matter of time before it’s universally adopted as the standard in legal, scientific, and scholarly citation.
  • It’s not possible to go back in time and rewrite the HTTP protocol, but Van de Sompel’s work involves adding to it. He and Michael Nelson are part of the team behind Memento, a protocol that you can use on Google Chrome as a Web extension, so that you can navigate from site to site, and from time to time. He told me, “Memento allows you to say, ‘I don’t want to see this link where it points me to today; I want to see it around the time that this page was written, for example.’ ”
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    Profile of the Internet Archive and the Wayback Machine.
Michael Sheehan

Explore the National Archives through social media - 2 views

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    Nice collection of resources from the National Archives shared through social media.
Kat Turner

Fact sheet 224 - The Wave Hill 'walk-off' - National Archives of Australia - 0 views

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    Australian Government site
Glenda Baker

TIME Magazine Covers - TIME Covers - TIME Magazine Cover Archive - 102 views

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    TIME has archived all their covers
ronhustvedt

National Archives Experience - 56 views

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    A digital collection of primary sources from the National Archives.
ronhustvedt

National Archives Experience - 14 views

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    Surf through over 10 billion records.....okay, so they did for you but there are over 1,200 here for you and they are ALL awesome! Your topic is probably here so look for it.
ronhustvedt

Eyewitness - 37 views

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    Great photos here for some of your topics...
ronhustvedt

Online Exhibits - 31 views

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    There are so many links here...I'm going to go through them and tag specific ones as much as possible, but it would be in your best interest to do it yourself!
Barbara Moose

Search the PopSci Archives | Popular Science - 42 views

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    We've partnered with Google to offer our entire 137-year archive for free browsing. Each issue appears just as it did at its original time of publication, complete with period advertisements. It's an amazing resource that beautifully encapsulates our ongoing fascination with the future, and science and technology's incredible potential to improve our lives. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do. In the future, we'll be adding more advanced features for searching and browsing, but for now, enter any keyword into the box below and dive in.
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