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John Evans

Magic in the Making Padlet by Mandi Figlioli - 2 views

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    Magic in the Making Tips & Tools for Getting Started
John Evans

How LEGO is a Great Toy for Stress Relief for Students During Exam Times - 0 views

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    "Students undergo a lot of pressure when exams are around the corner. It can be quite a challenge to focus on the task at hand in such a state of mind. This article is going to look at how students can relieve stress by playing with LEGO during exam times. People normally consider LEGO just a toy, however, it is so much more than just a toy. It exercises your brain and gives you many benefits as a result. Rather than watching cartoons on TV and tablets most of the time, engaging in LEGO can prove to be such an excellent utilization of time and energy."
John Evans

Mixkit - Extraordinary Free HD videos - 1 views

shared by John Evans on 11 Feb 19 - No Cached
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    "Extraordinary HD videos For you to use, completely free of charge."
John Evans

Creating Mobile Classroom Makerspace Library Program | Maker Maven | STEAM | Makerspace... - 1 views

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    As a school librarian, I try to offer spaces where students can create, make, and innovate. Trying to offer a makerspace to 100% of the student population can quickly become limiting due to space. Offering a mobile classroom makerspace solves this problem. A mobile classroom makerspace library program allows classroom teachers to check out 6 to 8 makerspace activities with the needed supplies packed together in one cart. Teachers can check-out a cart for their classroom for a week. During that week teachers can unpack the activities, and create a pop-up makerspace in their classroom when it fits into their schedule.      Last year I tried this at Ed White E-STEM with kindergarten and first grade classes. The teachers and students loved the mobile classroom makerspace carts so much we added a cart for 2nd grade this school year. The 2nd grade teachers want to take it a step farther. They want the library to supply a book with each activity, so they can use the cart as part of a Literacy Station. The students will explore, make, read, and then write about their experience.   The second year of this program has been a learning experience. This year we were able to fine tune the offerings in each cart by teachers expressing what worked, and what didn't work last year. We used teacher input as one measure to create this year's inventory list for the mobile classroom makerspace carts. 5 things to think about when creating a mobile classroom makerspace."
John Evans

Why It's Crucial -- And Really Hard -- To Talk About More Equitable Grading | MindShift... - 0 views

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    "This is the first article in a two-part series about equitable grading practices. This article sets up some of the challenges. In part two, learn how teachers are addressing this issue."
John Evans

How Teachers Are Changing Grading Practices With an Eye on Equity | MindShift | KQED News - 1 views

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    "Nick Sigmon first encountered the idea of "grading for equity" when he attended a mandatory professional development training at San Leandro High School led by Joe Feldman, CEO of the Crescendo Education Group. As a fairly new high school physics teacher, Sigmon says he was open-minded to new ideas, but had thought carefully about his grading system and considered it fair already. Like many teachers, Sigmon had divided his class into different categories (tests, quizzes, classwork, homework, labs, notebook, etc.) and assigned each category a percentage. Then he broke each assignment down and assigned points. A student's final grade was points earned divided by total points possible. He thought it was simple, neat and fair."
John Evans

ISTE | No device needed to teach kids to code - 2 views

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    "Leka DeGroot can relate to teachers who would like to bring coding to their classrooms but just can't fathom fitting it in. "Teachers often tell me, 'It sounds great but I don't have time, or I don't have the skills,' but you don't have to be a computer scientist to teach coding," assures DeGroot, a first grade teacher at Spirit Lake Elementary in Spirit Lake, Iowa. Just a few years ago DeGroot explored coding for the first time through Hour of Code. Today, she's a trainer for Code.org. She's driven by a desire to introduce students to computational thinking and integrating coding into the curriculum. "The basic concepts of listening to each other, communicating and collaborating, these are not just for computer science. We want every student to have those skills," DeGroot says. Even the youngest students benefit from the critical-thinking and problem-solving skills that coding provides. Not only do kids learn from it, they love it! Recently, for example, collaborated with a teacher in Wisconsin to have students write loop code dances for each other and then held a Google Hangout dance party. "
John Evans

5 Habits That Keep Your Brain Young | Inc.com - 0 views

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    "We all know our chronological age. That's as simple as counting the candles on your birthday cake. But do you know your biological age? This second number measures not how many years you've seen, but how much those years have impacted the functioning of your body and brain. Scientists calculate it a number of ways, but whatever methodology they employ, they agree chronological and biological age don't always line up. Some 80-year-olds function like people decades younger. They ace their memory and cognitive tests, and scientists peering at their cells can even spot significant differences. Experts have dubbed these role models of healthy aging "superagers." Just about all of us would love to one day become one. How do you achieve that? A long and fascinating article in the latest issue of UCSF Magazine delves into the work of the University of California, San Francisco's Memory and Aging Center to answer this question (hat tip to PsyBlog). Much of this research is still far too new to be of everyday use, but science has already determined a few simple interventions you can start using today to help keep your brain young."
Nigel Coutts

What meal would your team be? - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    What makes a team truly great? What are the qualities which allow some teams to perform at a high level while others seem trapped? One approach to this question is to consider a team as though they were a meal. Thinking metaphorically, we ask what are the ingredients that make a great team and how might we combine them to produce the best results?
John Evans

Become Aware of Your Own Biases | MediaSmarts - 3 views

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    "One of the hardest things about being a responsible sharer is to be aware of your own biases, the reasons why you might be more likely to believe something without evidence. These are aspects of the way we think that can lead us to accept false statements, reject true ones, or simply not ask enough questions.  "
John Evans

What I Learned from Writing a Data Science Article Every Week for a Year - 1 views

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    "There ought to be a law limiting people to one use of the term "life-changing" to describe a life event. Had a life-changing cup of coffee this morning? Well, hope it was good because that's the one use you get! If this legislation came to pass, then I would use my allotment on my decision to write about data science. This writing has led directly to 2 data science jobs, altered my career plans, moved me across the country, and ultimately made me more satisfied than when I was a miserable mechanical engineering university student. In 2018, I made a commitment to write on data science and published at least one article per week for a total of 98 posts. It was a year of change for me: a college graduation, 4 jobs, 5 different cities, but the one constant was data science writing. As a culture, we are obsessed by streaks and convinced those who complete them must have gained profound knowledge. Unlike other infatuations, this one may make sense: to do something consistently for an extended period of time, whether that is coding, writing, or staying married, requires impressive commitment. Doing a new thing is easy because our brains crave novelty, but doing the same task over and over once the newness has worn off requires a different level of devotion. Now, to continue the grand tradition of streak completers writing about the wisdom they gained, I'll describe the lessons learned in "The Year of Data Science Writing.""
John Evans

Creative Learning Spaces - YouTube - 2 views

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    "Before we created the iLab at Hillbrook, we asked students and teachers about the places they felt most creative and inspired. Their visions looked very similar to each other and, not surprisingly, very different than the classroom as we know it. It's worth listening to the needs identified by students and teachers if we are going to create inspiring learning spaces."
John Evans

Game-Based Learning: Preparing Students for The Future | EdSurge Guides - 2 views

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    "Two decades in, and it's abundantly clear that one of the most effective ways to nurture the 21st century's trademark skills-creativity, critical thinking, communication, collaboration-is by creating opportunities for kids to do what kids do naturally: play. So we've crafted this educators' guide to game-based learning, packed with resources for gaming gurus and greenhorns alike."
John Evans

12 Google Calendar Tricks You're Probably Not Using | PCMag.com - 3 views

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    "Can your calendar keep up with your busy schedule? These Google Calendar tips will help you and your team stay organized."
Phil Taylor

360° classrooms around the world - 3 views

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    Are you in? Please submit your 360° photo from your classroom to here: https://t.co/Jq6TENuZw9 by Feb.19th. @GoogleARVR @GoogleForEdu #GoogleExpeditions @MissStewy @LanttoSari @LadyWesner @MetteHardis @marienkoen @Mrreiff @MSDinahW @ASBIndia
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