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John Evans

How (and Why) to Disable Algorithmic Feeds on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook - 0 views

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    "Social networks offer a stream of updates from your family and friends or people you follow. But the feed you see isn't chronological. Instead, the social networks try to figure out what you'd like to see first, and show that instead. However, algorithmic feeds mean you'll miss some updates you might want to see. Which is why you should disable algorithmic feeds and enable chronological feeds instead. In this article we show you how to do that on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. "
John Evans

5 Twitter Tools to Discover the Best and Funniest Tweets - 0 views

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    "Twitter can be overwhelming if you don't use it regularly. Here are a few tools to discover the best and funniest tweets, and ensure you don't miss out on some of its best moments."
John Evans

Paper Tweets Build SEL Skills | Edutopia - 4 views

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    "Creating a Twitter board is simple. Make a template with space for a profile picture, the student's real name, a Twitter-style handle, a short bio, and a list of followers. That takes about a quarter of a page, leaving room for tweets. Have students fill out profiles-some of mine drew a profile picture, but most used a photo-and slip the profiles into clear sheet protectors. When we do this exercise, I display the profiles on a whiteboard for a few days, using magnets to hold them in place. When we're done, I store the profiles in a folder-they don't take up much space and are ready for next time. Cut some paper into small slips that students can use for tweets, which they can tape onto the appropriate profile."
John Evans

What Skills Do Google, Pinterest, and Twitter Employees Think Kids Need To Succeed? | E... - 1 views

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    "In today's day and age, Google, Twitter and Pinterest are three of the largest employers in the United States and internationally. Are students gaining the skills that one might need to eventually apply to one of those tech giants, if they chose to do so? In the year 2017, what hard and soft skills should students be developing in order to succeed in the 21st century workplace? What about in the year 2020? 2050? Let's stick with the "now," for a moment. In a recent interview, EdSurge explored which skill sets lead to career success for students-but we didn't talk to anyone in K-12 or higher education. In fact, we interviewed three individuals-Alexandrea Alphonso, Ryan Greenberg, and Trisha Quan-from each of those aforementioned tech companies. While the thoughts and feelings of each of the folks we interviewed do not represent the opinions of their employers, each of these technology leaders offered their thoughts in this exclusive Q&A on equity and access, areas that formal education didn't prepare them for, and their advice for teachers working to prepare students for an ever-changing workplace."
John Evans

Sharing More Than 140 Characters on Twitter - The New York Times - 2 views

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    "Q. How do you take screen shots of articles and then post them on Twitter, with sections highlighted and the URL of the article included? A. Annotating screen shots of text passages - and then posting the image and a link to the article on Twitter - is an effective way to make a point with the selected text. It also lets you get around the service's 140-character limit. You can mark up the screen shot's text in a few different ways on a mobile device or computer."
John Evans

A Great Tool for Generating Word Clouds from Tweets and Hashtags ~ Educational Technolo... - 3 views

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    "Tweetroot is an interesting app that is free today and only for a limited period of time. Tweetroot allows you to easily generate word clouds from tweets. Source data of your word clouds can be based on Tweets  a particular user shares, a hashtag, or mentions. For instance, creating a word cloud from the hashtag #edtech will enable you  to visualize the prominent words or topics being shared through this hashtag. You can also use the same strategy to analyze, for instance, your Twitter timeline and learn more about the things you have tweeted the most through a word cloud based on your 1000 most recent tweets. To use Tweetroot, you will obviously need to allow the app access to your Twitter account."
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